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NEWS
March 26, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks ago, as Secretary of State James A. Baker III was regaling a rapt breakfast table of congressmen with tales from his latest visit to Moscow, a pair of Democrats broke in to complain about the Administration's foreign aid programs. If the Cold War was over, they asked, why hadn't the budget changed? Why wasn't there more money for the new democracies in Eastern Europe and poor countries in Latin America and Africa? Baker's hazel eyes narrowed. His honeyed voice went cold.
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NEWS
December 3, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration Wednesday urged the countries of Eastern Europe to cut through bureaucratic obstacles and promptly return religious property seized by Nazi occupiers during World War II and by the communist governments that followed them. Undersecretary of State Stuart E. Eizenstat, chief of the U.S.
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NEWS
December 3, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration Wednesday urged the countries of Eastern Europe to cut through bureaucratic obstacles and promptly return religious property seized by Nazi occupiers during World War II and by the communist governments that followed them. Undersecretary of State Stuart E. Eizenstat, chief of the U.S.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The street-side entrance to Jaroslava Martinkova's apartment building is difficult to miss. The foggy glass doors keep passersby from gazing inside, but her name appears plainly on the doorbell panel, second from the bottom in a column of 10. Yet when New York attorney Lawrence Molnar came searching for Martinkova shortly after the fall of communism, he walked by the six-story building--blackened by years of chimneys spewing soot into the wintry Prague sky--three times before ringing the bell.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
SEC to Open East Europe Offices: The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission will open two offices in Eastern Europe later this year to advise former communist countries on developing stock markets, the agency's chief said. SEC Chairman Richard C. Breeden said the Wall Street watchdog agency would assign two senior staffers to work out of U.S. embassies in Eastern Europe, one probably in Warsaw and the other in a yet-to-be-determined location.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three weeks ago, concerned that the peaceful revolution in Eastern Europe had rendered his troop reduction plans obsolete, President Bush ordered his top advisers to review the situation and come up with a new plan. Now, less than 48 hours after the new plan was unveiled, events once again seem to have leapfrogged past the American position. West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher flew to Washington on Friday for a meeting with Secretary of State James A.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is taking a deliberately slow--and decidedly unenthusiastic--approach toward U.S. participation in a new development bank to help the newly emerging economies of former East Bloc nations. Although Washington has agreed in principle to take part in the venture, the Administration has been reluctant to make any firm commitment on how much financial assistance the United States may eventually contribute.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sense of occasion surrounding the London NATO summit that ended here Friday left few in any doubt that the changes agreed to by the alliance's 16 member countries represent a watershed development. But the London summit is likely to shape Europe's future in ways that were hardly mentioned in the afterglow of Friday's agreement.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
With their 41-year-old alliance on the verge of being overtaken by history, leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization unveiled on Friday a dramatic new blueprint for the future that President Bush said charts a "new course" for a long-divided Europe and "extends the hand of friendship" to old adversaries. "NATO has set a new path for peace," Bush declared as a two-day summit of alliance leaders ended. " . . .
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, invited by NATO leaders to join them for a meeting symbolizing the burial of the Cold War, said Friday that he is ready to go, and he hailed changes that the West made in its strategy at a time when his conduct of foreign policy is coming under fierce criticism at home.
NEWS
January 11, 1994
Continuing a nine-day marathon of summits, President Clinton travels to what used to be the Soviet Bloc mid-week, hoping to reassure emerging central European democracies of his commitment to their independence and economic reforms and trying to reinforce ties to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore, arguing that U.S. interests are still tightly linked to the fate of Europe, urged Americans on Thursday to keep fighting dangerous nationalism and demagogues in the nations once dominated by the Soviet Union. "To be strong at home, we must engage abroad as well," Gore said. "The struggle to erase communism's scars and ensure democracy's success is not their struggle alone."
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four days before President Clinton leaves for his first European summit meeting, the White House scrambled Tuesday to defend its new blueprint for East-West security and to mute East European criticism that threatens to mar the coming week's events before they begin. Facing eleventh-hour complaints from Polish President Lech Walesa and others, the White House mobilized Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman John M.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Declaring that the Cold War is over and that Eastern Europe now enjoys a generally free press, an advisory commission Thursday urged the U.S. government to scrap Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, the services established four decades ago to challenge the Communist monopoly on information behind the Iron Curtain. The commission said the Voice of America should continue to operate and would be enough to spread the American message. Malcolm S. Forbes Jr.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
SEC to Open East Europe Offices: The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission will open two offices in Eastern Europe later this year to advise former communist countries on developing stock markets, the agency's chief said. SEC Chairman Richard C. Breeden said the Wall Street watchdog agency would assign two senior staffers to work out of U.S. embassies in Eastern Europe, one probably in Warsaw and the other in a yet-to-be-determined location.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under a cold gray sky, U.S. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney stood shoulder to shoulder with his Czech counterpart here and watched as the grim and greatcoated soldiers of a former adversary goose-stepped past him. The ritual greeting by a friendly nation last week marked the start of the first visit ever by an American defense secretary to Prague and, with it, the end of an era in which Pentagon officials shunned Eastern European countries and demonized their militaries.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration officials Wednesday ridiculed House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) as the "Maxwell Smart" of American politics after he criticized its cautious approach towards changes sweeping Eastern Europe, and they said his proposal to offer direct economic aid to the Soviet Union is premature. Testifying before a House subcommittee, Secretary of State James A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1990 | DANICA KIRKA
Ladislav Kabat, a Czechoslovakian university official visiting Chapman College on Monday, put it bluntly. "We passed through huge political change," he said, referring to the peaceful removal of the Communist Party from its leadership role in Czechoslovakia. "Now is the more difficult thing: the economy." Kabat and five other Eastern European education leaders have these challenges in mind this month as they explore college campuses across the country.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush ordered an end to the 20-year-old arms embargo on Czechoslovakia, Poland and Hungary on Friday, opening the way for U.S. sales of military equipment to the former Warsaw Pact countries. The action came after senior Administration officials determined that the Soviet Union could no longer guarantee those nations' defense needs, U.S. officials said. The officials said the Administration did not yet plan to send high-tech weapons to the Soviet Union's former allies.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed merely an innocuous close to a meeting of two heads of state when President Bush and Poland's President Lech Walesa recently signed a declaration of "cooperation and partnership." But for all its diplomatic formality, the gesture amounted to a careful first step by the United States toward extending a mantle of security over Poland--and perhaps the rest of Eastern Europe.
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