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United States Foreign Relations El Salvador

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NEWS
March 9, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dan Quayle's trip here last month to demand that the government end human rights violations or face the loss of American aid has had almost no impact, with the number of killings actually increasing since his visit, according to diplomats and human rights groups. In the month before the vice president's February trip, the number of civilian deaths attributed to death squads and the military was eight. However, since Feb.
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NEWS
April 14, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ghosts of the U.S. role in El Salvador's civil war are haunting a pact that would give this tiny Central American country a crucial presence in international anti-drug efforts. Under a 10-year agreement signed by the two governments two weeks ago, Americans would fly drug surveillance missions out of Comalapa International Airport, U.S. and Salvadoran officials confirmed Thursday. The operations would close a gap in anti-narcotics monitoring that opened when the last U.S.
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NEWS
January 27, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
A military appeals court Tuesday ordered the release of three prisoners accused of shooting to death four U.S. Marines and nine civilians at an outdoor cafe in 1985. The tribunal upheld a decision by a lower military court pardoning the men under a sweeping amnesty law on political crimes. The three have never been brought to trial for the killings, for which a leftist guerrilla faction claimed responsibility. Tuesday's decision apparently will cost the Salvadoran government $18.5 million in U.
NEWS
July 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Still professing his innocence, a third national guardsman convicted of raping and killing four American churchwomen in El Salvador walked free from prison as church leaders worried that the truth in the case may never be known. Daniel Canales has admitted being at the murder scene but has insisted he did not participate. Canales said the guardsmen who committed the Dec. 2, 1980, murders "were executing orders of superiors."
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
A near-violent confrontation in which a Salvadoran army colonel ordered his troops to aim a loaded antitank weapon at U.S. Ambassador William G. Walker has led to the expectation by the American Embassy here that El Salvador's military leaders will send the officer out of the country--or face a damaged relationship. Walker has refused to discuss the incident. But according to various sources here and in Washington, it took place May 2 in the eastern province of Sonsonate and involved Col. Jesus Caseres, the volatile commander of the area's military garrison and a military-school classmate of the armed forces chief of staff, Col. Rene Emilio Ponce.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, reminding Democrats of their vice presidential nominee's past support for Contra funding, said Saturday that the Sandinistas' renewed crackdown on political dissent has created an opportunity for "a real bipartisan consensus" in support of new aid for the armed Nicaraguan opposition. In a bid to win Democrats' backing for a new Contra funding bill, Reagan, in his weekly radio address, complained that the Democrat-controlled House "removed the principal prod . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
A fiery Catholic priest is mourning the plight of war-ravaged Central Americans before an auditorium full of college students. "One out of every four babies starves to death in El Salvador," he says. "One out of four. The U.S. spends $1 million a day down there. (But) U.S. foreign aid doesn't buy food. It buys weapons. The army has them. The rebels have them. The death squads have them. What do the people have? They have poverty, no sanitation, no land reform and their schools under siege.
NEWS
June 13, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California Senate candidate Liz Figueroa may well be the best-liked politician in El Salvador. Although people here cannot vote for Figueroa in the fall election, they celebrated her triumph in the Democratic primary this month as a victory for Salvadorans. One daily newspaper here sent a correspondent to cover her campaign for the seat near Oakland.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ambassador William Walker moved into the giant new U.S. Embassy here shortly after a cease-fire ended El Salvador's 12-year civil war, one of his first guests was Joaquin Villalobos, a powerful leader of the anti-government guerrilla movement, the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front. As they toured the fortress-like complex on the city's western outskirts, Walker turned to Villalobos, whose forces had attacked the old embassy more than once, and said: "Welcome to a monument to you."
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration may try to thwart El Salvador's controversial new amnesty law by bringing its military officers to trial in American courts for human rights abuses committed during the Central American country's bloody 11-year civil war, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Thursday. In testimony to a House Appropriations subcommittee, he also said he is determined to ensure that the State Department will never mislead Congress about atrocities committed by friendly countries.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sparking new controversy in one of the most publicized cases in the prolonged, costly U.S. involvement in Central America's civil wars, Salvadoran authorities on Tuesday authorized the parole of three of the five soldiers convicted of killing four American religious women in 1980. Luis Antonio Colindres, the sub-segeant who first confessed to the slayings, and Jose Roberto Moreno Canjura walked free after serving 17 years of their 30-year murder sentences.
NEWS
June 13, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California Senate candidate Liz Figueroa may well be the best-liked politician in El Salvador. Although people here cannot vote for Figueroa in the fall election, they celebrated her triumph in the Democratic primary this month as a victory for Salvadorans. One daily newspaper here sent a correspondent to cover her campaign for the seat near Oakland.
NEWS
December 14, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Embassy in El Salvador discovered in 1990 that American military advisers were training a wealthy militia linked to the country's right-wing death squads, according to State and Defense Department documents. The U.S. ambassador, William G. Walker, immediately halted the training, despite protests from the chief of the U.S. military advisory mission, the documents show.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A State Department panel concluded Thursday that U.S. diplomats reported honestly and fully on human rights abuses in El Salvador during the 1980s but that higher officials in Washington sometimes distorted their reports for political reasons. The largely laudatory report abruptly reopened the 13-year-old debate over U.S. policy in Central America, and it prompted human rights activists and liberal Democrats in Congress to charge the State Department with whitewashing its own performance.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration may try to thwart El Salvador's controversial new amnesty law by bringing its military officers to trial in American courts for human rights abuses committed during the Central American country's bloody 11-year civil war, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Thursday. In testimony to a House Appropriations subcommittee, he also said he is determined to ensure that the State Department will never mislead Congress about atrocities committed by friendly countries.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ambassador William Walker moved into the giant new U.S. Embassy here shortly after a cease-fire ended El Salvador's 12-year civil war, one of his first guests was Joaquin Villalobos, a powerful leader of the anti-government guerrilla movement, the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front. As they toured the fortress-like complex on the city's western outskirts, Walker turned to Villalobos, whose forces had attacked the old embassy more than once, and said: "Welcome to a monument to you."
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Alfredo Cristiani of El Salvador held intensive talks with key lawmakers Thursday in an effort to persuade Congress not to suspend military aid to his embattled government because of the recent slayings of six Jesuit priests and other human rights abuses.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration praised El Salvador on Monday for admitting military involvement in the recent slayings of six Jesuit priests, but members of Congress suggested that continued U.S. military support for the tiny Central American nation might be in jeopardy unless the killers are punished.
NEWS
January 18, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration assured El Salvador on Friday that it will receive broad international political and economic support to help carry out its new peace accord, but he warned both sides that they must firmly reject violence if the effort is to work. In a speech before the country's National Assembly, Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush on Wednesday praised Salvadoran President Alfredo Cristiani's efforts to end his country's long civil war and urged leftist rebels to "return to the negotiating table and stay there." A State Department official said the United States may move soon to free $42.5 million in military aid to El Salvador if the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN) keeps up its attacks on Cristiani's government.
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