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NEWS
November 23, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, proclaiming the end of an era of "hard, joyless peace between two armed camps," called on Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday to join him in an effort to "once and for all end the Cold War" when the two meet off Malta next week.
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NEWS
March 1, 2002 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British Prime Minister Tony Blair on Thursday endorsed President Bush's decision to take on states that accumulate weapons of mass destruction and suggested that he would back U.S. action against Iraq. Blair stopped short of adopting Bush's characterization of Iran, Iraq and North Korea as an "axis of evil"--a view that has been widely condemned in Europe--but said he shares the sentiment behind it.
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NEWS
February 24, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
In a private audience Tuesday with Queen Elizabeth II, former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger was awarded the highest honorary knighthood that Britain can bestow on a foreigner. "He's been a staunch friend to Britain and will be remembered most of all for his unfailing support and assistance during the Falklands war," the Foreign Office said in a statement explaining the award.
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Egyptian government has convicted Yasser Serri in absentia for a failed attempt to assassinate the prime minister. In London, Serri runs the Islamic Observation Center, which he says is a human rights charity. In Yemen, Abu Hamza Masri is accused of masterminding a 1998 plot to bomb British targets in Aden. The radical cleric, who lost both hands to a land mine in Afghanistan, preaches Muslim unity against U.S. aggression from his London mosque.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton warned Britain and France on Thursday that the allies' threat to launch air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina is the "last chance" for the U.N. peacekeeping force there and called for "a strong air response to raise the price of Serbian aggression." "You can't go about the world saying you're going to do something and then not do it," the President said at a news conference.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | From Reuters
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev will hold a short dress rehearsal today for the Washington summit. Gorbachev will fly into the Royal Air Force base at Brize Norton, about 70 miles west of London, in the morning, for what Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov described as both a refueling stop and an opportunity for a fueling of ideas.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | Reuters
A U.S. judge on Monday found that Curtis Howard, an American, may be extradited to Britain to be tried in a case British newspapers have dubbed the "Fatal Attraction" killing. Extradition is not expected soon, however, since several avenues of appeal remain. Howard, 23, is accused of killing Englishwoman Catherine Ayling, 24, with whom he allegedly was romantically obsessed.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Puritans from this tiny village were among the earliest Pilgrim settlers in the New World, but it's only now, more than 350 years later, that students at the local primary school are preparing to mark their first American-style Thanksgiving. And it's all because of President-elect George Bush. Bush has what genealogists here describe as an impeccably patrician English pedigree. So his election victory triggered both a touch of British chauvinism and unaccustomed attention to things American.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal advisors said the U.S. should consider barring blood donations from people who lived in or visited Britain because of concerns about mad cow disease. The worry is that these people may have eaten meat or meat products infected with mad cow disease and could be at risk for getting and transmitting new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD, Food and Drug Administration advisors said. The FDA will now decide whether to direct blood banks to follow the panel's advice.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Rejects Plea to Delay Talks With Britain: The government rejected a bid by six major airlines to delay the "open skies" aviation talks until it decides whether to allow the proposed link between American Airlines and British Airways. In a letter to President Clinton, the airlines said the United States should not go ahead with the talks until the Justice Department decides on the competitive implications of the alliance. But a Transportation Department spokesman said the U.S.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, in his first meeting with a European leader, made a strenuous case Friday for a missile defense system, saying that "it makes a lot of sense" to seek protection against an accidental missile launch or "potential blackmail." In response, visiting British Prime Minister Tony Blair said he now believes "even more firmly" that the controversial concept should be further debated and explored.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When he greets British Prime Minister Tony Blair at Camp David today, it will be President Bush's second straight weekend of high-level diplomacy. But unlike last Friday's reunion with Mexican President Vicente Fox, a longtime acquaintance, Bush must launch a relationship with Blair virtually from scratch--a daunting task at first blush. The men have never met and have spoken only twice by telephone.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tony Blair strongly defended the latest U.S.-British bombing of Iraq against growing European criticism Tuesday, three days before his planned first meeting with President Bush. Blair denied that the policy to contain Iraqi President Saddam Hussein--along with military issues such as the proposed U.S. missile defense system--could drive a wedge between the United States and Europe and force Britain to take sides.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prodded by the U.S. and British governments, five leading oil companies agreed Wednesday to a new code of conduct, pledging to discourage police and private security firms from abusing people who live near their oil fields.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2000 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Executives of the biotech companies that hold patents on human genetic data said they welcomed a joint British-American government declaration Tuesday on the need to keep raw genetic information freely available to the world's scientists. The officials, along with some Wall Street analysts, said investors overreacted in selling off their companies' stocks, arguing that the statement represented no change in the policies of the two governments.
NEWS
December 20, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the BBC Symphony Orchestra wanted a new leader steeped in traditional English music but also versed in more popular and contemporary works, it handed the baton to American conductor Leonard Slatkin. In need of private funding, Oxford University's Lincoln College searched for someone who could approach alumni unaccustomed to being asked for donations. It hired veteran American fund-raiser Alice Gosling.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
EU 'Disappointed' Over U.S.-British Air Pact: EU Transport Commissioner Neil Kinnock also repeated his threat of legal action, a spokeswoman said. "We are disappointed. We have said all along that we do not believe [bilateral agreements] are a solution," European Commission spokeswoman Sarah Lambert told a news conference. The deal allows a second U.S.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1999
* The U.S. rejected a petition for antitrust immunity from would-be alliance partners British Airways and AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, citing lack of progress in reaching a new aviation pact with Britain. Still, the Transportation Department said the U.S. remains committed to reaching an open-skies agreement with Britain that includes access to London's Heathrow Airport for additional U.S. carriers.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | From Reuters
Britain and the United States agreed Saturday on the need for urgent talks between Washington and the European Union to resolve a trade dispute over bananas, British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook said. Cook, speaking after a two-hour meeting with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright at his country residence, said both sides felt a solution to the deepening disagreement over banana imports should be found as soon as possible. The European Union is furious that the U.S.
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