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United States Foreign Relations Ethiopia

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NEWS
August 10, 1989
The United States began sending planes and military rescue teams to Ethiopia to help search for missing Rep. Mickey Leland (D-Tex.) and 13 others and said Ethiopia has agreed to a search flight over the area by a U-2 spy plane. Leland, 44, chairman of the House Select Committee on Hunger, eight other Americans and five Ethiopians have been missing since Monday on a flight from Addis Ababa to a refugee camp near the Ethiopian border with Sudan. U.S.
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NEWS
June 6, 1998 | KARL VICK, THE WASHINGTON POST
A simmering border dispute between two usually friendly neighbors erupted into airstrikes Friday when Ethiopian fighters bombed an airport in Eritrea, and Eritrea sent its planes to a provincial capital of the country that only five years ago gave it independence. The exchange dramatically escalated recent fighting that until Friday had been limited to ground skirmishes on a section of barren land that each country claims as its own.
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NEWS
November 15, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will meet this weekend with foreign ministers of three African members of the U.N. Security Council to see if they would support a resolution authorizing military action against Iraq, U.S. officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will not oppose independence for Ethiopia's rebellious province of Eritrea and expects the new government in Addis Ababa to negotiate a peaceful settlement of the long secession struggle, the State Department's chief of African affairs said Friday. "If (the Eritreans) want to exercise the right of self-determination, there's nobody who's going to stop them," Assistant Secretary of State Herman Cohen said.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The unexpected U.S.-Soviet pledge to begin a joint airlift of food aid to hungry Ethiopians is symbolic of a major new effort by the two countries to work together in ending one of Africa's longest running civil wars, Administration officials said Sunday.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S.-sponsored peace talks aimed at ending the nearly 30-year war between Ethiopia and the rebel province of Eritrea broke up after achieving minimal progress, a senior U.S. official said. The United States is trying to broker an agreement in which Eritreans would eventually be able to vote in a referendum to determine their future status.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This capital's delicate calm was shattered Wednesday, the day after a rebel movement occupying the city declared itself a new government, as crowds of demonstrators ranged about town protesting the takeover and the American government's involvement in the affair. At least eight separate mobs surged through the city beginning just before noon, chanting anti-rebel and anti-American slogans.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Marxist government of Ethiopia has reached an agreement with the United States and Israel to more than double the number of Jews it allows to emigrate, officials said Monday. The Ethiopian government is being rewarded with Israeli aid and a thaw in relations with Washington, which have been strained for over a decade, the officials said.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will not oppose independence for Ethiopia's rebellious province of Eritrea and expects the new government in Addis Ababa to negotiate a peaceful settlement of the long secession struggle, the State Department's chief of African affairs said Friday. "If (the Eritreans) want to exercise the right of self-determination, there's nobody who's going to stop them," Assistant Secretary of State Herman Cohen said.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | KARL VICK, THE WASHINGTON POST
A simmering border dispute between two usually friendly neighbors erupted into airstrikes Friday when Ethiopian fighters bombed an airport in Eritrea, and Eritrea sent its planes to a provincial capital of the country that only five years ago gave it independence. The exchange dramatically escalated recent fighting that until Friday had been limited to ground skirmishes on a section of barren land that each country claims as its own.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This capital's delicate calm was shattered Wednesday, the day after a rebel movement occupying the city declared itself a new government, as crowds of demonstrators ranged about town protesting the takeover and the American government's involvement in the affair. At least eight separate mobs surged through the city beginning just before noon, chanting anti-rebel and anti-American slogans.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An army of youthful and remarkably disciplined rebel soldiers was in full military command of this capital Tuesday, and in London agreement was reached under U.S. mediation for the rebels to rule the country until a new provisional government is formed. Troops of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) took control of Addis Ababa after a dawn assault that found the city almost entirely undefended by government forces. The anxiety of the city's 2.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel forces moved into this capital city at dawn today, with a coordinated assault on the presidential palace, the international airport and other strategic points. Within hours, the rebels claimed they had taken over the capital, Reuters news service reported. The shooting broke out about 5:30 a.m. Rebel tanks moved up the hill in front of the palace and quickly scored a hit on the compound's ammunition dump, which was still burning two hours later.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 15 years ago, a group of Israeli and American men went to the small village of Quara in Ethiopia, spoke to the elders and asked for the names of all the Jews. Men, women and children--the men carefully wrote down their names and then drove away as suddenly as they had come, leaving behind a promise that, one day, they would be back to take them to Israel.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government Saturday confirmed the fall of Asmara, the country's second-largest city, to Eritrean rebels--a development that may have finally brought an end to Africa's longest civil war, the 30-year Eritrean struggle for independence. The fall of Asmara came with the surrender late Friday of Ethiopia's 2nd Army--a force of 100,000 that was once considered the continent's best-trained and best-equipped fighting force--to troops of the Eritrean People's Liberation Front.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a rebel army pressing on this capital city from three fronts, Israeli authorities here began a massive airlift Friday designed to spirit more than 14,000 Ethiopian Jews to safety in Israel over a period of 48 hours.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
His eyes rimmed in red, a kit bag dropped wearily at his feet, Air Force Capt. John E. Matwick was describing the rigors of searching for a twin-engine plane in some of the roughest territory and most contrary weather conditions in the world. "With the weather so bad, the hard thing is just keeping track of where you have searched," the 33-year-old Palos Verdes, Calif., native said at Addis Ababa airport after a 10-hour day spent searching fruitlessly for the missing plane carrying Rep.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 15 years ago, a group of Israeli and American men went to the small village of Quara in Ethiopia, spoke to the elders and asked for the names of all the Jews. Men, women and children--the men carefully wrote down their names and then drove away as suddenly as they had come, leaving behind a promise that, one day, they would be back to take them to Israel.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after Ethiopian leader Mengistu Haile Mariam fled his beleaguered capital earlier this week, President Bush bluntly told Mengistu's successors that if they want American help in arranging a cease-fire with the advancing rebels, they must allow all remaining Ethiopian Jews to leave at once for Israel, Administration officials said Friday. Bush's letter, dispatched Wednesday, seems to have done the trick.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ethiopian President Mengistu Haile Mariam, whose 14-year rule over one of the world's poorest countries was marked by deadly famine and protracted civil war, resigned Tuesday and fled his country for Zimbabwe. The stunning exit of a man whose ouster has been the goal of two major insurrectionist groups came just two days after rebel troops captured two strategic towns and cut the main overland supply route to the capital, Addis Ababa, raising the prospect of a violent end to his regime.
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