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NEWS
December 14, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Global trade negotiators Monday inched to the brink of completing their seven-year campaign to rewrite the rules of international trade, with only a solution-defying dispute over entertainment issues standing in the way. One by one, some of the most contentious issues slipped toward resolution as negotiators reached agreement on textile quotas--a political headache for the White House--and maritime issues.
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NEWS
March 20, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring a temporary truce on trade issues, the Clinton Administration agreed Friday to delay a new round of sanctions against European goods while the European Community signaled its willingness to consider giving American firms greater access to its markets. The joint announcement was coupled with the disclosure that a potential irritant in U.S.-Japanese relations has been eased now that Japan has met a negotiated target for purchases of foreign-made computer chips.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO foreign ministers Friday offered unanimous rhetorical support for U.S. action against Iraq but ruled out committing the alliance's combined military forces, even if American troops come under fire. Manfred Woerner, secretary general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, said NATO will respond militarily if Turkish territory is attacked but will not send allied forces to Saudi Arabia in the event that American, British or French troops engage in combat there. Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Wednesday that he is willing to discuss new European proposals to provide massive Western aid to the Soviet Union but warned that he will not be ready to support such an effort until Moscow makes needed economic reforms and ends its aid to Cuba.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel, on his way to Canada and the United States, stopped over to meet Iceland's president Saturday and attended a play he wrote but had never seen performed. The playwright president told reporters he decided to visit Reykjavik because the city is a symbol of peace--a reference to the U.S.-Soviet summit in 1986. Havel talked with reporters before attending a production in Icelandic of his play "Slum Clearance."
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration said Monday that a new, united German state would not have to be a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization but rather need only maintain "ties" to the alliance. The shift in U.S. policy is the latest and most significant in a hectic series of revisions as Administration policy-makers run to keep up with the rapidly changing European situation. If it becomes reality, the new position on Germany would substantially reshape the Western alliance.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush expressed surprise Wednesday that the Soviet Union had withdrawn its strong opposition to the U.S.-backed reunification talks of the two German states and permitted "a major breakthrough" in the process. "This surprised me that they (the Soviets) were willing to make an agreement on that," Bush said. "I mean to be very elated about . . . the fact that the Secretary (of State James A.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush concluded an international gathering of scientists, economists and environmentalists Wednesday by asserting that his Administration has "never considered research a substitute for action" in addressing the threat of global warming. "We cannot allow a question like climate change to be characterized as a debate (of) economists versus environmentalists," Bush said in remarks interpreted by conference participants as a softening of the position he took only a day earlier.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When leaders of the 12-nation European Community gather Saturday in Dublin, Ireland, they confront the dream of the community's founding visionary, Jean Monnet. Americans may see the EC as an amorphous bureaucracy buried in steel quotas and cereal prices, but Monnet always saw these mundane tasks as building blocks toward a loftier goal: a European economic and political unity that would bind Germany and its neighbors so closely that war in Europe would be unthinkable.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany's foreign minister Wednesday endorsed a Bush Administration proposal to assure continued U.S. influence in a post-Cold War Europe, even though America's military power may be overshadowed by the economic might of the 12-nation European Community. After meetings with President Bush and Secretary of State James A.
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