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United States Foreign Relations Europe

NEWS
December 26, 2000 | From the Washington Post
With government-bashing a popular sport, now comes a report from the Brookings Institution on the federal government's 50 most important achievements of the last 50 years. The greatest achievement, according to the Brookings report, was the rebuilding of Europe after World War II. Expanding voting rights was No. 2, while promoting equal access to public accommodations was No. 3 and reducing workplace discrimination was No. 5.
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BUSINESS
December 18, 2000 | Bloomberg News
European Commission chief Romano Prodi will lead a delegation to Washington today for a transatlantic summit with President Clinton that will zero in on issues ranging from a trade dispute about bananas to NATO's future. For the Europeans, the real focus might be on gatherings being lined up on the summit's sidelines with possible officials of the incoming Bush administration.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. conference on climate change collapsed in an embarrassing international fiasco after overnight parleys Saturday, as the United States and Western Europe twice failed to agree on the fine print of a plan for reducing polluting gases that are heating up the planet.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by appeals from Pope John Paul II and the European Union, Italy has unleashed a barrage of e-mails and official protests against the scheduled execution tonight of an Italian American convicted of murder in Virginia. The apparently futile campaign on behalf of Derek Rocco Barnabei, which is to culminate here with a nationally televised vigil counting down what are expected to be the final four hours of his life, has rallied much of this nation in defense of an emigrant's grandson.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2000 | Reuters
The United States has delayed, possibly until next week, a closely watched decision on rotating sanctions imposed on European Union products, officials said. Under a new law, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative must revise the list of European products affected by the sanctions every six months until the EU changes its beef and banana trade policies to comply with World Trade Organization rulings.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2000 | From Reuters
The United States has asked Germany and Britain for details of their proposed funding for the new Airbus super jumbo to see whether it complies with World Trade Organization rules, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said Tuesday. Barshefsky's comments come days after Airbus Industrie partners upped the pressure on U.S. rival Boeing Co., giving the European consortium a new, leaner corporate structure and the green light to sell the 555-seater A3XX.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2000 | Reuters
The United States expects to publish a revised list of European goods to be hit with sanctions in two trade disputes late this week or early next, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said. The Clinton administration had set a June 19 target date for announcing changes to its retaliatory trade measures on $308.2 million of European Union goods in separate disputes involving beef and bananas.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder warned President Clinton on Thursday that Europeans fear that plans for a U.S. missile defense system could set off a new arms race and provoke fresh instability in Russia. During 90 minutes of official talks and then at a private dinner at an eastern Berlin restaurant, the two leaders verbally dueled over the dangers and protections they foresee if the U.S. launches its reinvention of the 1980s "Star Wars" missile-interception system.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city from which explorers set off half a millennium ago to discover a new world, President Clinton embarked Tuesday on a weeklong journey demonstrating the degree to which the diplomatic map has changed during his White House years--but testing too the remaining authority of his tenure. From a meeting with the leaders of the European Union here today to a very Clintonesque seminar with fellow New Age politicians in Berlin and a weekend summit in Moscow with Russian President Vladimir V.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Is there any privacy left in the Internet Age? Not according to some Europeans, who fear that the U.S. government regularly eavesdrops on their phone calls, reads their e-mail, checks their pagers and scans their faxes. The suspected snoops mostly work for America's largest and perhaps most secretive spy service, the National Security Agency. Responsible for providing U.S.
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