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NEWS
March 31, 2000 |
The United States and Britain have offered reassurances that their giant eavesdropping network is not involved in economic espionage, a European Union commissioner testified Thursday. European Enterprise Commissioner Erkki Liikanen testified during a special European Parliament debate that he received a letter from the U.S. State Department and Britain. Both governments denied accusations that the American-led Echelon spy network is used to snoop on Europeans and European businesses. "The U.S.
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NEWS
June 15, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush and European Union leaders on Thursday stressed cooperation on the issues of trade and AIDS and downplayed their sharp differences over global warming by announcing collaborative research into the climate phenomenon. "The values and the goals we share are durable and they're healthy and they're great goals," Bush declared at an EU gathering here.
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NEWS
June 15, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush and European Union leaders on Thursday stressed cooperation on the issues of trade and AIDS and downplayed their sharp differences over global warming by announcing collaborative research into the climate phenomenon. "The values and the goals we share are durable and they're healthy and they're great goals," Bush declared at an EU gathering here.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
European environment ministers said Saturday that the Kyoto global warming treaty is still "alive" and that they will go forward with ratification plans--with or without the United States. The ministers, who gathered in this city 90 miles above the Arctic Circle, condemned President Bush's rejection of mandatory reductions of carbon dioxide emissions called for under the 1997 climate treaty. Bush said Thursday that the compulsory reductions were too harmful to the U.S. economy.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1997 | (Reuters)
The U.S. and the European Union said they have cleared the way for a deal under which approval of safety standards by one country would be accepted by others in five product categories. "We feel that we have a breakthrough, and we hope that it will lead to an agreement in the next few days," President Clinton said after talks at The Hague with Dutch Prime Minister Wim Kok and European Commission President Jacques Santer.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
6 EU Nations Side With U.S. in 'Open Skies' Deal: Braving the threat of lawsuits, Austria, Luxembourg, Belgium, Finland, Sweden and Denmark sided with the United States and snubbed their own executive commission to continue talks on "open skies" agreements. European Union Transport Commissioner Neil Kinnock said U.S. airlines will gain greater access in the 15-nation EU than what is offered in return, arguing that bilateral deals would give "aggressive and predatory" U.S.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
European environment ministers said Saturday that the Kyoto global warming treaty is still "alive" and that they will go forward with ratification plans--with or without the United States. The ministers, who gathered in this city 90 miles above the Arctic Circle, condemned President Bush's rejection of mandatory reductions of carbon dioxide emissions called for under the 1997 climate treaty. Bush said Thursday that the compulsory reductions were too harmful to the U.S. economy.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2000 | BLAIR PETHEL, BLOOMBERG NEWS
President Clinton warned European Union leaders they were risking a trade dispute with the U.S. over plans to subsidize Airbus Industrie's new super-jumbo passenger aircraft, U.S. officials said Monday. Clinton told the EU officials at a summit in Washington that loans to develop the new A3XX jet must not be made by EU governments on preferential terms. The aircraft will be the largest in the world if it enters service as planned in 2006, a year later than Airbus' original projection of 2005.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2000 | BLAIR PETHEL, BLOOMBERG NEWS
President Clinton warned European Union leaders they were risking a trade dispute with the U.S. over plans to subsidize Airbus Industrie's new super-jumbo passenger aircraft, U.S. officials said Monday. Clinton told the EU officials at a summit in Washington that loans to develop the new A3XX jet must not be made by EU governments on preferential terms. The aircraft will be the largest in the world if it enters service as planned in 2006, a year later than Airbus' original projection of 2005.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 |
The United States and Britain have offered reassurances that their giant eavesdropping network is not involved in economic espionage, a European Union commissioner testified Thursday. European Enterprise Commissioner Erkki Liikanen testified during a special European Parliament debate that he received a letter from the U.S. State Department and Britain. Both governments denied accusations that the American-led Echelon spy network is used to snoop on Europeans and European businesses. "The U.S.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1997 | (Reuters)
The U.S. and the European Union said they have cleared the way for a deal under which approval of safety standards by one country would be accepted by others in five product categories. "We feel that we have a breakthrough, and we hope that it will lead to an agreement in the next few days," President Clinton said after talks at The Hague with Dutch Prime Minister Wim Kok and European Commission President Jacques Santer.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
6 EU Nations Side With U.S. in 'Open Skies' Deal: Braving the threat of lawsuits, Austria, Luxembourg, Belgium, Finland, Sweden and Denmark sided with the United States and snubbed their own executive commission to continue talks on "open skies" agreements. European Union Transport Commissioner Neil Kinnock said U.S. airlines will gain greater access in the 15-nation EU than what is offered in return, arguing that bilateral deals would give "aggressive and predatory" U.S.
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