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October 11, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was portrayed as a minor incident, a mere embarrassment to the intelligence community: Five Americans--four of them CIA officers--were accused by France in February of conducting an economic espionage operation against the government in Paris. The French--U.S. allies, after all--expressed outrage. The U.S. ambassador to Paris, Pamela Harriman, summoned by the French to receive an official protest, privately fumed as well. The affair briefly made headlines, then faded. But now, U.S.
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NEWS
July 5, 2000 | From Reuters
A French state prosecutor has launched a preliminary judicial investigation into the workings of the United States' "Echelon" spy system of satellites and listening posts, the prosecutor's office said Tuesday. Echelon, set up during the Cold War, can intercept millions of telephone, fax and e-mail messages, and Washington has been accused of using it for economic espionage against its allies, a charge it denies. The investigation, which could spark a diplomatic quarrel with the U.S.
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NEWS
March 5, 1991
President Bush and French President Francois Mitterrand will meet March 14 on the French Caribbean island of Martinique. A statement from the Elysee Palace said the two leaders will have INFORMAL TALKS and lunch together. Mitterrand, whose country was part of the allied coalition against Iraq, proposed on Sunday a summit of the permanent members of the U.N. Security Council to discuss restoring peace to the Middle East after the Gulf War.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As companies around the world race to dominate the communications equipment business, investors have picked Lucent Technologies, Nortel Networks and the ambitious Cisco Systems as the clear front-runners. But there's also a promising sleeper in the mix: Alcatel of France. The once-stodgy phone equipment company in Paris has been gaining on its North American rivals, thanks to a survival strategy that is steadily doing the unthinkable: Americanizing the prized French firm.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most public espionage rift between the two allies in almost 20 years, France charged Wednesday that several American citizens, including diplomats, had engaged in espionage and demanded that they leave the country. According to the newspaper Le Monde, which first reported the story Wednesday, the Americans allegedly are members of the CIA, and some have been under surveillance by the French since 1992 for economic and political espionage and for trying to recruit key officials.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton warned Britain and France on Thursday that the allies' threat to launch air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina is the "last chance" for the U.N. peacekeeping force there and called for "a strong air response to raise the price of Serbian aggression." "You can't go about the world saying you're going to do something and then not do it," the President said at a news conference.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The venerable French newspaper Le Monde, seldom quick with praise for American leaders, said in a Friday editorial that President Bush's command of the allied war effort has made him "the most popular American President since Harry Truman on the day after victory in 1945." The mass-circulation German tabloid Bild Zeitung compared the American President to Otto von Bismarck, the "Iron Chancellor" who unified Germany in the 19th Century.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In emotional testimony, the American general who commanded NATO warplanes over Yugoslavia blasted the French on Thursday for vetoing planned airstrikes, saying the moves heightened danger to young U.S. fliers. Lt. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1996 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When French President Jacques Chirac addressed a joint session of Congress Thursday, many congressional Democrats had other plans--including all three Democrats from the San Fernando Valley area. Reps. Anthony C. Beilenson of Woodland Hills, Howard L. Berman of Panorama City and Henry A. Waxman of Los Angeles all missed the speech. In fact, only about 30 of the House's 197 Democrats attended Chirac's address, with many of the no-shows boycotting out of anger over French nuclear testing.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chances Slim for More European Limits on Hollywood: France plans to urge European Union partners this week to come up with a solid plan to help Europe's audiovisual industry match up to Hollywood competition. But the chances of Paris getting what it wants--tougher limits on U.S. films and TV programs shown on European television--at a meeting of union culture ministers in Bordeaux today and Tuesday are slim. At stake are revisions to the EU's 1989 "television without frontiers" regulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2000 | Religion News Service
In a report issued Monday, the French government called on nations worldwide to stop the growth of religious sects, and criticized the United States for offering too much religious freedom to "cults." "The confusion maintained across the Atlantic between religious freedom . . . and prevention, even repression, of punishable sectarian excesses does not make dialogue any easier," said the report, issued by the Interministerial Mission for the Fight Against Sects. A U.S.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In emotional testimony, the American general who commanded NATO warplanes over Yugoslavia blasted the French on Thursday for vetoing planned airstrikes, saying the moves heightened danger to young U.S. fliers. Lt. Gen.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrice Vidieu, who tends 75 goats in a green and tranquil corner of France's countryside, has met the enemy of peasants like himself, and it is the McDonald's hamburger. In recent weeks, the maker of tangy goat cheese from Rocamadour and thousands of other small-scale French farmers have been giving the U.S.-based fast-food giant, symbol and agent of the invasion of Europe by American agribusiness and its techniques, a very rough time.
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Half a century after the alliance was created as a bulwark against Soviet aggression, the leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization put down a new marker Saturday, agreeing that it can use military force to prevent the abuse of human rights anywhere in Europe.
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Jacques Chirac, who rose from night-shift dishwasher in America to the presidency of France, and today comes calling at the White House, true friends don't always have to agree. "There is neither rivalry nor competition," the French leader assured a group of U.S. correspondents here this week. "On the other hand, there can be different approaches." Those "different approaches," however, have led to friction in the two countries' relationship.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1999 | Associated Press
On the eve of a visit from French President Jacques Chirac, the Clinton administration threw cold water on his proposal to link the world's major currencies as a way to prevent future global currency crises. Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin said that while the idea of creating more stability among the U.S. dollar, the Japanese yen and the new European euro is appealing in theory, the practical problems of implementing it are "enormous."
NEWS
October 4, 1997 | THOMAS W. LIPPMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Facing the clearest test so far of its commitment to punish foreign companies that invest in Iran, the Clinton administration has decided to hold off on sanctions against a French energy firm in an effort to avert a trade war with the European Union, administration officials said Friday.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the milky-colored plastic tarp stretched taut by a latticework of steel poles, power tools are whining in a nasty, nasally chorus. The air is fragrant with the tang of freshly worked oak. Down in the yawning cobblestone-lined dry dock is what looks like the fossil of some enormous and strange dinosaur, its spinal column stretching 145 feet, its ribs vaulting skyward. Christian Le Gallic, who left a 17-year career in the French navy in hopes of becoming part of all this, is thrilled.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright won qualified French endorsement Thursday for use of military force against Iraq if necessary to get Baghdad to comply with the United Nations weapons inspections program. After talks here with French Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine, Albright said Washington and Paris agreed that they no longer will tolerate a "very grave" crisis for which Iraq is "fully responsible."
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