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June 7, 1992 | JIM MANN and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They stood together as allies through 40 years of Cold War, but the United States, Germany and Japan are now discovering that the conflicts that divide them are growing as strong as the common concerns that once bound them together. On issue after critical issue, from the nature of the new world order to the bruising economic competition that will dominate the 1990s, the world's new Big Three find themselves increasingly at odds.
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NEWS
March 28, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With all due respect, Mr. President, planet Earth is not a U.S. plaything to be saved or sullied depending on popular mood swings driven by fears of recession and rolling blackouts. That, in spirit, is the message German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder will deliver to President Bush on Thursday when the two leaders meet in Washington to ponder an expanding chasm between Western powers no longer unified by the common menace of the Cold War.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In real time it seems like just yesterday. But in Realpolitik time it was a different age altogether. Gone are the days when the East German sports machine was oiled by a seemingly endless supply of money. Gone is the time when East German athletes' every need was attended to by a state-financed sports system nurturing selected specimens from cradle to gold medal. Now the East Germans are benefiting from the generosity of Americans.
NEWS
March 19, 2001
Germany's environment minister expressed concerns over U.S. policy on reducing carbon dioxide emissions in a letter to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency chief Christie Whitman. Juergen Trittin urged the United States to follow the agreements reached in 1997 in Kyoto, Japan, on regulating so-called greenhouse gases to curb global warming. Another round of discussions is planned in Bonn in July.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Monday called the U.S.-German differences over the treatment of Scientologists "clearly a subject for bilateral discussion" but downplayed the issue in talks with German leaders and termed members' claims that they suffer from Nazi-style persecution "distasteful." U.S.
NEWS
March 19, 2001
Germany's environment minister expressed concerns over U.S. policy on reducing carbon dioxide emissions in a letter to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency chief Christie Whitman. Juergen Trittin urged the United States to follow the agreements reached in 1997 in Kyoto, Japan, on regulating so-called greenhouse gases to curb global warming. Another round of discussions is planned in Bonn in July.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With all due respect, Mr. President, planet Earth is not a U.S. plaything to be saved or sullied depending on popular mood swings driven by fears of recession and rolling blackouts. That, in spirit, is the message German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder will deliver to President Bush on Thursday when the two leaders meet in Washington to ponder an expanding chasm between Western powers no longer unified by the common menace of the Cold War.
NEWS
November 7, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after U.S. troops departed this no-longer-divided city, the Yanks came back Friday to secure one last beachhead with the inauguration of the American Academy in Berlin. Although the cultural center in an elegant lakeside villa was envisioned more as a meeting place for writers and artists, the academy's politically minded founders swiftly established their intention to use it as an instrument of the U.S.-German strategic alliance.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his first visit to the United States since being elected Germany's next chancellor, Gerhard Schroeder on Friday appeared to indicate support for NATO airstrikes to ease the humanitarian crisis in Kosovo.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
U.S. and German officials failed Monday to reach an agreement on a proposed $5-billion settlement on Holocaust-related legal claims, imperiling the chances of an agreement in time for a presidential visit to Germany next week. Representatives of the two sides said progress had been made in negotiations Monday but further talks were needed on the key issue of how much protection German companies would obtain from legal actions in the United States. Deputy Treasury Secretary Stuart E.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German Defense Minister Rudolf Scharping told Parliament on Friday that the U.S. Army has informed Berlin of nine incidents of known or suspected releases of depleted uranium by American forces at German bases over the past two decades. No Germans have reported illness from suspected exposure to the substance, however.
NEWS
July 27, 2000 | From the Washington Post
In a dramatic turnaround, top German officials are arranging for an American father, Joseph Cooke, to begin a reunification process with his children, who were placed in a German foster home more than seven years ago. The development in a case that had hijacked talks last month between President Clinton and Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder signified a shift in the German approach toward custody disputes with the U.S.
NEWS
May 29, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unmarked gravel path winds through new-growth forest on the fringe of this Bavarian town to a hidden vista of maniacal delusion: a massive concrete bunker where in 1945 the doomed Third Reich was plotting to rescue the lost cause of world domination.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
U.S. and German officials failed Monday to reach an agreement on a proposed $5-billion settlement on Holocaust-related legal claims, imperiling the chances of an agreement in time for a presidential visit to Germany next week. Representatives of the two sides said progress had been made in negotiations Monday but further talks were needed on the key issue of how much protection German companies would obtain from legal actions in the United States. Deputy Treasury Secretary Stuart E.
NEWS
November 26, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A picture of U.S. Ambassador John Kornblum in this week's issue of Der Spiegel, Germany's most influential weekly newsmagazine, shows him in a cowboy hat and sheriff's badge, blowing on the muzzle of a smoking gun. The photograph of the envoy as wannabe Wyatt Earp is from this year's Mardi Gras celebration in Cologne, where Kornblum served as master of ceremonies for the annual masquerade.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | BOB DROGIN and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Searching for a solution to what has become the most extensive European conflict since World War II, European leaders were offered two proposals Wednesday aimed at restoring peace to Yugoslavia, but the sudden diplomatic flurry produced little visible progress. Germany presented the European Parliament with a six-point plan that would engage Russia and the United Nations, both of which have been sidelined so far in efforts to resolve the Kosovo crisis.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
A suspected top aide to Osama bin Laden, the Saudi millionaire accused of organizing the deadly bombings at U.S. embassies in Africa this summer, will soon be extradited to the United States from Germany, a government spokesman said Saturday. A report by the Hamburg-based weekly Welt am Sonntag said Mamduh Mahmud Salim, who is jailed in Munich, would be extradited Monday.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
Despite pleas from the German government, a German citizen was executed Wednesday in a cloud of cyanide fumes--a week after his brother was put to death for the same crime. Walter LaGrand, 37, died in the gas chamber for his role in the 1982 murder of a bank manager. His brother, Karl, 35, was executed Feb. 24 by lethal injection. "To all my loved ones, I hope they find peace," Walter LaGrand said. "To all of you here today, I forgive you and I hope I can be forgiven in my next life."
NEWS
December 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A suspected top aide to Osama Bin Laden, the Saudi exile accused of being behind the U.S. embassy bombings in East Africa, was turned over to American officials for extradition to the United States. Mamdouh Mahmud Salim, 40, was taken to Munich's airport and placed on a flight to an undisclosed U.S. location, a Bavarian Justice Ministry spokesman said. U.S. officials have charged Salim with conspiracy to commit murder and use of weapons of mass destruction in a plot to kill U.S. citizens.
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