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United States Foreign Relations Greenland

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August 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Washington's top arms control expert met Danish and Greenland officials amid U.S. efforts to secure support for a controversial shield to protect the United States from missile attacks. In Nuuk, Greenland's capital, John Holum, the State Department's undersecretary for arms control and international security, discussed proposals to upgrade an existing U.S. radar station on the Arctic island as part of the new national missile defense system.
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NEWS
August 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Washington's top arms control expert met Danish and Greenland officials amid U.S. efforts to secure support for a controversial shield to protect the United States from missile attacks. In Nuuk, Greenland's capital, John Holum, the State Department's undersecretary for arms control and international security, discussed proposals to upgrade an existing U.S. radar station on the Arctic island as part of the new national missile defense system.
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NEWS
July 23, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an icebound land with just one person for every 15 square miles and no industry ever to have blighted the backdrop of majestic icebergs and emerald glaciers, one would hardly expect to stumble upon this ghost town. Here, on a mossy saddle of rock overlooking a frozen bay of breathtaking beauty, stand two dozen sturdy wooden houses, a handful of sod hovels and a graveyard, all silent testimony to a cultural trespass half a century ago.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an icebound land with just one person for every 15 square miles and no industry ever to have blighted the backdrop of majestic icebergs and emerald glaciers, one would hardly expect to stumble upon this ghost town. Here, on a mossy saddle of rock overlooking a frozen bay of breathtaking beauty, stand two dozen sturdy wooden houses, a handful of sod hovels and a graveyard, all silent testimony to a cultural trespass half a century ago.
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