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United States Foreign Relations Guatemala

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NEWS
September 30, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first major test of his leadership of the nation's spy service, Director of Central Intelligence John M. Deutch on Friday dismissed two senior CIA officials and punished eight others for their involvement in a scandal surrounding the agency's operations in Guatemala. Deutch's decision to impose stern punishments in the messy controversy appeared to represent a conscious effort by the new director to distance himself from his predecessor, R.
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NEWS
July 6, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guatemalan President Alfonso Portillo urged President Bush on Thursday to support legislation that would permit more Guatemalan refugees to remain in the United States and reported afterward that Bush responded "very positively." At a brief White House session that marked their first meeting, Portillo asked Bush to back a push to give refugees from the long Guatemalan civil war permission to remain here, just as Cuban and Nicaraguan refugees have been given special amnesties.
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NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Americas Watch, a human rights group based in New York, accused the government of President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo of trying to cover up "unspeakable" abuses by the military. The report was issued four days after the United States recalled its ambassador to highlight U.S. displeasure with Cerezo's record.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Reflecting on the break in Central America's cycle of repression and revolution, President Clinton apologized Wednesday for U.S. support of the rightist regimes that ruled Guatemala for three decades. He also promised "to do everything I possibly can" to eliminate discriminatory provisions in U.S. immigration laws that favor refugees from Cuba and Nicaragua over those who fled to the United States to escape right-wing governments in Guatemala and El Salvador that were supported by Washington.
NEWS
August 1, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, shifting his focus from the deteriorating Middle East peace process, flies today to Guatemala, where he hopes to rally the fractious leaders of Central America to denounce the Nicaraguan government. "I hate to spend all my time discussing communiques, because there's a lot of work to do, things that people should be taking action on," Shultz said after learning that Guatemala and Costa Rica are withdrawing their support for a U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1989
The U.S. Postal Service announced an embargo on all international mail destined for Guatemala, which is embroiled in a labor disturbance. Postal officials said that until further notice, all mail destined for Guatemala will be returned to sender with the endorsement "service temporarily suspended." The embargo was requested by the Guatemala postal administration.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of leftist unionists, middle-class neighborhood watch members and human rights activists gathered at dusk Tuesday for an eerily silent, five-block pilgrimage to pay tribute to slain Roman Catholic Bishop Juan Jose Gerardi and insist that his killer be found. Many carried placards that read "We demand justice," a theme that echoed full-page advertisements in Tuesday's newspapers.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With scores of Indian women and children crowding near, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright stood in a remote rebel demobilization camp in western Guatemala on Sunday and hailed the success of the first phase of the peace accords ending 35 years of civil war. "Some of you may wonder what the secretary of State is doing here," she told the former rebels and the Indians. "We are all one family, and when one part of the family suffers, we all suffer."
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, in an effort to close off new smuggling routes used by South American drug traffickers, has drafted plans to expand the use of U.S. troops and military helicopters in Guatemala, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica, Bush Administration officials confirmed Sunday. Under one proposal now being circulated by the Administration to lawmakers, about a dozen U.S.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan said Thursday that he will nominate James H. Michel, a State Department official, to be ambassador to Guatemala.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of leftist unionists, middle-class neighborhood watch members and human rights activists gathered at dusk Tuesday for an eerily silent, five-block pilgrimage to pay tribute to slain Roman Catholic Bishop Juan Jose Gerardi and insist that his killer be found. Many carried placards that read "We demand justice," a theme that echoed full-page advertisements in Tuesday's newspapers.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beautiful scenery, stunning Maya ruins and bargain prices maintained this nation's reputation as a backpackers' paradise, a must-see on the college vacation circuit, even during more than three decades of civil war. But late last week, the rapes and robbery of Maryland university students focused international attention on the postwar violence engulfing this Central American nation and raised questions about how safe it is to travel here.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With scores of Indian women and children crowding near, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright stood in a remote rebel demobilization camp in western Guatemala on Sunday and hailed the success of the first phase of the peace accords ending 35 years of civil war. "Some of you may wonder what the secretary of State is doing here," she told the former rebels and the Indians. "We are all one family, and when one part of the family suffers, we all suffer."
NEWS
March 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States has concluded that top Guatemalan officials and other leaders helped cover up the 1990 killing of an American innkeeper there, the New York Times reported. U.S. officials now believe that former presidents Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo and Jorge Serrano, along with two defense ministers and top military officers paid by the CIA, covered up the death of Michael DeVine, the newspaper said. Rep. Robert G. Torricelli (D-N.J.
NEWS
September 30, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first major test of his leadership of the nation's spy service, Director of Central Intelligence John M. Deutch on Friday dismissed two senior CIA officials and punished eight others for their involvement in a scandal surrounding the agency's operations in Guatemala. Deutch's decision to impose stern punishments in the messy controversy appeared to represent a conscious effort by the new director to distance himself from his predecessor, R.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | EDWARD ORLEBAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A U.S. woman's three-week hunger strike here to protest what she claims is the illegal detention of her guerrilla husband is putting a strain on Guatemala's relations with the United States. Jennifer Harbury, a 43-year-old Harvard Law School graduate who married guerrilla commander Efrain Bamaca in 1991, says she will continue her protest until her husband, missing since a battle in March, 1992, is handed over to the courts.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guatemalan President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo, responding to the recall of U.S. Ambassador Thomas Stroock for consultations on a deteriorating human rights situation in Guatemala, charged that U.S. policy is unfair and inconsistent. "The attitude of the United States is unjust and unfairly critical," Cerezo said. "We didn't hear this kind of criticism with dictatorships in the past." Cerezo was elected in 1985, ending 17 years of military rule.
NEWS
March 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States has concluded that top Guatemalan officials and other leaders helped cover up the 1990 killing of an American innkeeper there, the New York Times reported. U.S. officials now believe that former presidents Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo and Jorge Serrano, along with two defense ministers and top military officers paid by the CIA, covered up the death of Michael DeVine, the newspaper said. Rep. Robert G. Torricelli (D-N.J.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, in an effort to close off new smuggling routes used by South American drug traffickers, has drafted plans to expand the use of U.S. troops and military helicopters in Guatemala, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica, Bush Administration officials confirmed Sunday. Under one proposal now being circulated by the Administration to lawmakers, about a dozen U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1992
I am so disgusted with the Academy Awards this year. First I heard George Lucas say that filmmakers are powerful teachers. Then I heard the best picture award go to "The Silence of the Lambs." So, are the people responsible for making and honoring this film teaching us that watching violence is the best kind of entertainment? What's next? Will the best picture award next year go to a "snuff" film? FRANCES ROUSE Sierra Madre
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