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United States Foreign Relations Hawaii

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NEWS
December 4, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reasons are as compelling as the paycheck drawn on a Tokyo bank, as obvious as the miso soup breakfast special at the hotel coffee shop, as dramatic as the U.S. senator with the name Inouye: Commemorating Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor is a complicated affair for Hawaii. Here, 50 years later, in what became the 50th state, oil from the great fight still seeps from the sunken battleship Arizona. Yet bonds with Japan are stronger and more vital here than anywhere else in America.
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NEWS
January 17, 1993 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans who come here probably know when Pearl Harbor was bombed--or can find out with the flick of a travel brochure. But how many tan-obsessed tourists--groggily extruding themselves from narrow seats in crammed jumbo jets for respites in paradise--know that the last monarch of the sovereign Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown by a group of U.S. sugar planters and businessmen backed by 162 United States Marines? Not many, it seems safe to say.
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NEWS
January 17, 1993 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans who come here probably know when Pearl Harbor was bombed--or can find out with the flick of a travel brochure. But how many tan-obsessed tourists--groggily extruding themselves from narrow seats in crammed jumbo jets for respites in paradise--know that the last monarch of the sovereign Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown by a group of U.S. sugar planters and businessmen backed by 162 United States Marines? Not many, it seems safe to say.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reasons are as compelling as the paycheck drawn on a Tokyo bank, as obvious as the miso soup breakfast special at the hotel coffee shop, as dramatic as the U.S. senator with the name Inouye: Commemorating Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor is a complicated affair for Hawaii. Here, 50 years later, in what became the 50th state, oil from the great fight still seeps from the sunken battleship Arizona. Yet bonds with Japan are stronger and more vital here than anywhere else in America.
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