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United States Foreign Relations Honduras

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NEWS
January 11, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. and Honduran troops began their latest round of joint military maneuvers Saturday in this country's tense southern border region not far from the scene of recent fighting between Nicaraguan troops and anti-Sandinista rebels. About 220 soldiers from the 27th Engineers Brigade of the U.S. Army's 20th Combat Airborne Force based at Ft. Bragg, N.C., parachuted from C-141 transport airplanes for an exercise that will upgrade the U.S.
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NEWS
October 27, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos. Fransisco. Rene Pinto Polaco. Prisoner Sauceda. Mario was here. Carved roughly into the bricks of an abandoned jail cell a few yards from an airstrip that U.S. forces built in 1983, the names symbolize the mystery of El Aguacate. The United States used this air base in eastern Honduras to supply and train Nicaraguan counterrevolutionaries, known as Contras, fighting their country's leftist Sandinista government in the 1980s.
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NEWS
April 8, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
More than 1,000 students marched on the U.S. Embassy on Thursday and burned 20 automobiles to protest the expulsion to the United States of a reputed drug kingpin before being turned back by gunfire and tear gas. Police said at least one demonstrator was killed but local radio stations put the number of casualties at four dead and two wounded. The privately owned Honduran Radio Nacional and Radio America said at least four people had died from gunshots fired from inside the embassy annex.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S.-built military base in Honduras contains cramped metal cells apparently used to torture and kill political prisoners, a top Honduran official said. The cells, along with dozens of possible grave sites, were discovered at El Aguacate air base in eastern Honduras, which the United States built in 1983 for Nicaraguan Contra rebels, who fought a U.S. proxy war against the leftist Sandinista government in their neighboring country. Forensic experts from the U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 1988
Honduras lifted a five-day state of emergency aimed at quelling anti-American violence in which five Hondurans died, but two schools where the protests broke out remained closed and guarded by troops. The emergency was imposed after 2,000 protesters--enraged over the arrest of suspected drug baron Juan Ramon Matta Ballesteros and his subsequent expulsion to the United States--attacked the U.S. Consulate and U.S. Information Agency office on April 7.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
A remote Honduran island in the Caribbean has reportedly become the main depot for a CIA-run military operation supplying rebels fighting to oust the Sandinista government of Nicaragua. Rebel sources and military observers, who asked that they not be further identified, said Americans are overseeing rebel supply operations on one of the Swan Islands, once a support base for the abortive CIA-backed invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
The United States is prepared to provide up to $3 million to an international commission to begin planning the voluntary relocation of Nicaraguan Contras to their homeland if democratic conditions exist, it was announced Friday. State Department deputy spokesman Richard Boucher said the funds would be given to a commission composed of United Nations and Organization of American States officials.
NEWS
April 11, 1988
Tegucigalpa's Roman Catholic archbishop deplored recent anti-American rioting and called on Hondurans to work together for peace. Hector Enrique Santos, head of the Honduran Bishops' Conference, urged Hondurans "to cooperate to heal the wounds" opened by recent unrest. "No one can be a Catholic if he is overtaken by hatred, and no one can be a true citizen if he violates the laws of the nation," Santos said at a Mass.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Reagan devoted most of his regular weekly radio address Saturday to the issue of Nicaragua, castigating Congress for halting aid to the Contras and declaring that the incursion by Sandinista troops into Honduras proved that the Managua regime is a regional threat.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The Sandinista attack along the Honduran border was a calculated risk aimed at crippling the Contras militarily and forcing them to negotiate an end to their 6-year-old insurgency.
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | WALTER PINCUS, THE WASHINGTON POST
CIA Inspector General Frederick P. Hitz has reopened an investigation into the failure of agency clandestine officers to report allegations of torture by a CIA-supported Honduran military-intelligence unit in the mid-1980s, according to agency officials and congressional sources.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | ART PINE and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Cuban refugees took to the seas again in large numbers Tuesday, the Clinton Administration won agreement from Panama, Honduras and another nation to accept up to 17,000 more Cuban migrants if detention camps at the Guantanamo Bay naval base fill up. The Coast Guard said its cutters had picked up 1,234 migrants by 6 p.m. EDT, following the recovery of 112 on Monday.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The soldiers stopped the crowded bus on its busy morning route the other day and ordered the young male passengers to step off, new "recruits" for the Honduran army. Then something went wrong. A youth tried to escape through a rear door and the soldiers opened fire, killing a 22-year-old woman and wounding two Hondurans and a Canadian citizen.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | BETSY BURBRIDGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Betsy Burbridge is a regular contributor to High Life. and
Some Orange County teen-agers experienced a different way of life and learned a lesson in values when they spent a week this summer working at Rancho el Paraiso in San Esteban Olancho, Honduras. "I saw a big difference between kids in the states and kids in Honduras," said Camie Velin, who will be a junior at Orange High School this fall. "The kids in Honduras have nothing, yet they think they have everything.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even after the kidnaping of Dr. Humberto Alvarez Machain set off howls of protest from Mexico, officials of the Drug Enforcement Administration refused to rule out further abductions to bring the suspected killers of agent Enrique Camarena to justice in the United States. "The mission is simple," one official declared. "Track down and eliminate all persons involved in the kidnap, torture and murder."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990
A federal judge in Los Angeles on Friday denied convicted drug kingpin Juan Ramon Matta Ballesteros' request to drop charges against him stemming from the 1985 murder of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena. Matta was abducted from his Honduras home in April, 1988, by the Honduran military at the behest of U.S. law enforcement. He says that constituted "outrageous government misconduct." Matta claimed that he was tortured en route to the United States, a charge denied by U.S. and Honduran officials.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The presidents of five Central American countries, ignoring direct appeals from President Bush to go slow, agreed in principle Sunday to start dismantling the U.S.-backed Nicaraguan rebel army within weeks. "The presidents have reached a consensus that this plan should go forward right away," President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua said during a break in the talks in this Caribbean banana port.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
Oliver L. North met with then-Vice President George Bush a few hours after lying to the House Intelligence Committee about assisting the Nicaraguan Contras, an entry in North's White House diaries suggests. Portions of the diaries, released Tuesday, renew questions about whether Bush was more deeply involved in assisting the Contras than he has acknowledged.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Snipers fired automatic weapons at a bus carrying 28 U.S. Air Force personnel Saturday, and seven were injured, a U.S. officer said. A leftist group, the Morazanista Front of Honduran Liberation, claimed responsibility, said Maj. Bruce Jessup, a spokesman for U.S. troops based in the Central American nation. Three attackers fired on the bus about 1 p.m. six miles north of Tegucigalpa, the capital, he said. He said two Americans were seriously wounded.
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