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United States Foreign Relations Hong Kong

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NEWS
April 27, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Chris Patten said Monday that during his scheduled visit to Washington next week, he will plunge into the U.S. debate over policy toward China by lobbying personally for preservation of normal Sino-U.S. trade ties. Any action by Washington to end China's most-favored-nation trade status would not only cause economic damage to the United States, China and Hong Kong but would also harm efforts to promote political liberalization in China, Patten told a group of U.S. reporters here.
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NEWS
June 21, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The carefully orchestrated but fragile independence of this Asian financial center from mainland China is being threatened by fallout from the U.S.-China espionage scandal, officials fear. A recent congressional report claiming that Hong Kong has become a major transshipment point for Chinese spies and smugglers has triggered calls for a review of U.S. policy that recognizes Hong Kong's unusual status as an independent territory within mainland China.
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NEWS
June 18, 1997 | JIM MANN
Let's look at the future of the relationships among the United States, China and Hong Kong as the British colony returns to Chinese control on July 1. What's going to happen? Three broad trends are already emerging and will become ever clearer over the next year. First, the United States and China will clash with each other repeatedly over the issue of elections and democracy in Hong Kong.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic midnight raid, Hong Kong's anti-corruption unit this week cracked a syndicate pirating compact discs, including one top customs official who was charged with tipping off the pirates before raids. After a three-month investigation by the Independent Commission Against Crime and Corruption into why pirates had managed to elude capture, the anti-graft unit made 19 arrests, including that of Gregory Wong, head of customs' Prosecution, Intelligence and Investigation Bureau.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Tuesday urged China to respect human rights in Hong Kong after the British colony reverts to Chinese sovereignty in July, but he ruled out retaliation by the United States if Beijing rejects his advice. At a White House news conference, Clinton acknowledged that his policy of "engagement" with Chinese leaders--his decision to maintain regular economic ties--has not had the desired effect of improving Beijing's dismal human rights record.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S.-Hong Kong Reach Airline Agreement: The pact, to take effect in 1997, replaces one with Britain. It "will provide for stability and expansion of the thriving U.S.-Hong Kong air transportation market as jurisdiction over the region reverts from British to Chinese control in mid-1997," U.S. Transportation Secretary Federico Pena said. The United States will obtain the right to select carriers to provide nonstop service to Hong Kong from three more U.S. cities.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Bill Appears to Be Gaining Support: A U.S. bill that would formalize American policy on Hong Kong independent of U.S.-China policy appears to be gaining support in the British colony despite initial misgivings, the Wall Street Journal reported. The proposed U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act seeks to bolster the colony's autonomy--and thus that of U.S. business interests--by according the colony as much diplomatic recognition as possible under provisions of the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
As previously reported in The Times, David Emmes has been exploring the prospect of an SCR tour of the Far East. Now that he's back from Singapore, Hong Kong and Tokyo, he says a tour is more probable than ever. The idea had been gestating for "roughly a year," he said. It was spurred by Susan Whitten, a member of SCR's support guild who has overseas business interests and told officials of the Singapore Festival of Arts about the theater. Emmes estimates that it will cost "roughly $100,000" to take a production to Singapore in the third week of June, 1990.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday stepped up his campaign to persuade Congress not to block renewal of normal trade privileges for China, warning that to do so would only hurt Hong Kong, which will revert from British to Chinese rule in two weeks. In his weekly radio address, Clinton warned bluntly that "no step would more clearly harm Hong Kong" politically than reversing the course the U.S.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a Chinese institution's public failure to comply with Hong Kong's privacy law, the post-colonial government is trying to quickly enact a bill that could put Chinese state institutions in the territory above the law. The Adaptation of Laws Bill would restore a British colonial practice of exempting the government from local laws and would expand the definition of the government to include mainland representatives in Hong Kong as well as local officials.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | JIM MANN
Let's look at the future of the relationships among the United States, China and Hong Kong as the British colony returns to Chinese control on July 1. What's going to happen? Three broad trends are already emerging and will become ever clearer over the next year. First, the United States and China will clash with each other repeatedly over the issue of elections and democracy in Hong Kong.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday stepped up his campaign to persuade Congress not to block renewal of normal trade privileges for China, warning that to do so would only hurt Hong Kong, which will revert from British to Chinese rule in two weeks. In his weekly radio address, Clinton warned bluntly that "no step would more clearly harm Hong Kong" politically than reversing the course the U.S.
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton sent a clear, if restrained, signal to China on Friday, telling a pro-democracy activist from Hong Kong that the United States wants traditional civil liberties to endure there after the Chinese takeover July 1. "We believe it's an important matter, and we expect that [the Chinese] will live up to their agreement" to preserve Hong Kong's civil liberties, the president told reporters later Friday. "And it's our policy, strong policy, that they should."
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore underscored U.S. opposition to China's proposed restrictions on political activity in Hong Kong by announcing Saturday that they will meet with Martin Lee, head of the pro-democracy movement in the British colony. The White House announcement came one day after a challenge from Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Tuesday urged China to respect human rights in Hong Kong after the British colony reverts to Chinese sovereignty in July, but he ruled out retaliation by the United States if Beijing rejects his advice. At a White House news conference, Clinton acknowledged that his policy of "engagement" with Chinese leaders--his decision to maintain regular economic ties--has not had the desired effect of improving Beijing's dismal human rights record.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The carefully orchestrated but fragile independence of this Asian financial center from mainland China is being threatened by fallout from the U.S.-China espionage scandal, officials fear. A recent congressional report claiming that Hong Kong has become a major transshipment point for Chinese spies and smugglers has triggered calls for a review of U.S. policy that recognizes Hong Kong's unusual status as an independent territory within mainland China.
NEWS
November 14, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past decade, the United States has avoided becoming entangled in disputes over the future of Hong Kong, even though tens of thousands of Americans work there and more than $7 billion in American money is invested there.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
To the alarm of business leaders, Hong Kong is drafting a law that would bring it into compliance with any sanctions China may impose on foreign countries after it takes over the British colony next year, a newspaper reported Sunday. The South China Sunday Morning Post said the legislation would mean that Hong Kong risks "being sucked into Sino-U.S. trade wars" after the hand-over. Hong Kong is to remain a capitalist, free-trading territory under Chinese sovereignty.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After China reclaims control of Hong Kong next year, British Gov. Chris Patten will be back in London. Democracy leader Martin Lee says he fears he may be in prison. Both are visiting Washington to make sure the United States keeps a watchful eye on the city even if they cannot.
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