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United States Foreign Relations Hungary

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August 26, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS and WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writers
U.S., West German and Swedish authorities have broken a major spy ring centered on a retired U.S. Army sergeant who allegedly sold secret plans for the defense of Europe to Soviet Bloc agents, officials said Thursday. The retired sergeant first class, Clyde Lee Conrad of Sebring, Ohio, was a custodian of top-secret documents at a U.S. Army archive in West Germany and allegedly sold U.S. and North Atlantic Treaty Organization plans for repelling a Soviet ground attack on Western Europe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tibor Toczauer stood in the warm morning sun at MacArthur Park on Saturday and reflected on the good luck he and his fellow Hungarian-Americans were about to experience. "Up until this last week, I couldn't believe we would be this fortunate," Toczauer said, referring to the impending arrival of Hungary's prime minister, Jozsef Antall.
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NEWS
July 27, 1988
Hungarian leader Karoly Grosz, in a speech at the National Press Club in Washington, appealed for U.S. understanding and support for his political and economic reforms. Grosz, 58, who succeeded Janos Kadar two months ago as premier and head of Hungary's Communist Party, spoke of fostering the free flow of capital, wanting "more democracy" and creating a market economy in which state funds would be used only when the private market could not satisfy the need.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced a $5-billion increase in International Monetary Fund lending to Eastern Europe on Thursday as he welcomed to the White House Hungary's first democratically elected prime minister in four decades. Jozsef Antall, the latest in a series of new Eastern European democratic leaders to visit Washington, also was told by Bush that Hungary will be allowed to open a long-sought consulate in Los Angeles. During the Cold War, U.S.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
President Bush, offering a preview of his visit next week to Poland and Hungary, declared Thursday that he would stress his "strong support for the democratic course these nations have chosen" but would avoid raising tensions or driving a wedge between the Soviet Union and its allies.
NEWS
July 11, 1989 | From Reuters
An attempt to form a human chain between the U.S. and Soviet embassies in Budapest on the eve of President Bush's visit to Hungary failed Monday because only a few hundred people turned out in scorching heat. The organizers, reformist groups within the ruling Communist Party, had said the attempt to bridge the 2 1/2 miles between the two embassies was aimed at encouraging dialogue between the superpowers.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, signaling that the Bush Administration plans an active role in encouraging political reform in the Communist states of Eastern Europe, told the foreign ministers of Poland and Hungary on Sunday that the United States will try to help move their economies toward the West, aides said.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
In a striking example of how communism is crumbling in Eastern Europe, President Bush went before an enthusiastic audience at Karl Marx University of Economics here Wednesday and outlined a seven-point program to aid Hungary in its efforts to develop free enterprise and a more open political system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1988 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
The first thing that caught the eye of Szabolcz Bertalan and his fellow teen-age Hungarian cliff climbers when they arrived Friday at the downtown Los Angeles Mall was a 20-foot-high rock wall. They did what comes naturally to experienced climbers: They scampered up it like spiders wearing sneakers.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced a $5-billion increase in International Monetary Fund lending to Eastern Europe on Thursday as he welcomed to the White House Hungary's first democratically elected prime minister in four decades. Jozsef Antall, the latest in a series of new Eastern European democratic leaders to visit Washington, also was told by Bush that Hungary will be allowed to open a long-sought consulate in Los Angeles. During the Cold War, U.S.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall and President Bush have common ground for commiseration when they meet Thursday in Washington: Both are caught up in a storm of second thoughts among the voters who put their parties in power. Antall's center-right coalition took a drubbing in local elections that will give opposition Free Democrats control of Budapest and bolster the liberals' claims that Hungarians want radical action on the worsening economic crisis.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hungary's new non-Communist president on Thursday urged the Bush Administration to lend more support to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in an effort "to preserve the stability of the Soviet Union. "It would be to the benefit of all of Eastern Europe . . . if the Soviet Union maintained its stability in a way in which the Baltic states could also gain their independence," President Arpad Goncz told reporters. "The United States should shape its policies accordingly.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of Hungary's drift from the Kremlin's orbit, the newly elected Parliament on Wednesday applauded an opposition proposal that Hungary withdraw from the Warsaw Pact and suspend all military exercises with the alliance until the break can be formally negotiated. In another development, Defense Minister Gyorgy Karpathy confirmed reports that Hungary has sold Soviet-built MIG jets to the United States but denied that the sales disclosed any Soviet military secrets.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Edward Lee Howard, the former CIA agent who defected to the Soviet Union after allegedly passing vital U.S. secrets, has been permanently expelled from Hungary as a result of the pro-democracy upheaval there and is now in another East Bloc country, U.S. sources disclosed Wednesday. The expulsion has prompted U.S. officials to redouble efforts to apprehend Howard, but it is not clear whether those prospects are good. Hungary revoked Howard's asylum at least a month ago at the urging of U.S.
NEWS
October 30, 1989
Since the Supreme Court decision Webster vs. Reproductive Health Services earlier this year, I have read scores of articles in both lay and legal publications on its significance. Nothing I have read was as sweeping in scope and penetrating in analysis as Assemblyman Friedman's article. With tacticians as brilliant as Friedman leading the pro-choice movement, anti-abortionists may come to regret that they overturned the status quo. REP. HENRY A. WAXMAN D-Los Angeles
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JACK NELSON, Times Staff Writers
An upbeat President Bush, en route from Budapest to Paris, said Thursday that his just-concluded visit to Poland and Hungary should have dispelled any doubts about U.S. support for reforms not only in Eastern Europe but also in the Soviet Union. Abandoning the cautious approach that he had once sounded about Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JACK NELSON, Times Staff Writers
An upbeat President Bush, en route from Budapest to Paris, said Thursday that his just-concluded visit to Poland and Hungary should have dispelled any doubts about U.S. support for reforms not only in Eastern Europe but also in the Soviet Union. Abandoning the cautious approach that he had once sounded about Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
In a striking example of how communism is crumbling in Eastern Europe, President Bush went before an enthusiastic audience at Karl Marx University of Economics here Wednesday and outlined a seven-point program to aid Hungary in its efforts to develop free enterprise and a more open political system.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Perhaps, in earlier years, President Bush's tour of Poland and Hungary would have stolen a title fit for Hollywood--"Dancing With the Red Devil," for instance, or "Eighty Hours Behind the Iron Curtain." But these are strange days here, and what for 40 years has been referred to as the Iron Curtain has all but lost that label.
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