Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations India
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations India

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1995 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twelve UCLA alumni reunited this weekend, observing a bond forged four decades ago on another continent. They include a former U.S. ambassador, a congressman, a rabbi, a college professor, a museum docent, a concert promoter, a retired probation officer, a waste-water consultant, a bank official, a housewife and two lawyers. They are a mix of races and religions: African American, Asian American and white; Jewish and Catholic.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 29, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than three months of single-minded concentration on defeating terrorism, the Bush administration faces a potentially more dangerous foreign policy crisis in the confrontation between nuclear-armed India and Pakistan. Unlike with the Sept. 11 attacks, which produced a quick military response, the administration must move far more subtly in trying to mediate between two countries that are playing key roles in the war against terrorism.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. foreign affairs specialists are monitoring the potential for increased cooperation between Russia, China and India, amid a growing conviction in all three countries, especially after NATO's bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, that U.S. power must somehow be checked. Although agreeing that the three nations are far from coalescing into a pan-Eurasian, anti-NATO axis, the analysts remain concerned about what they call a nightmare scenario: an alliance that would bring together about 2.
NEWS
July 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
The United States is reviewing sanctions imposed on India after 1998 nuclear tests and they will likely be lifted after consultations with Congress, the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff said here Thursday. Indicating a substantial easing of the sanctions imposed by the Clinton administration, Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton said Washington is ready to resume military contacts and broaden defense cooperation with India. "Sanctions are being reviewed in Washington, even as we speak.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pakistani government flouted international opinion again Saturday by announcing its sixth nuclear test, and then it all but invited world leaders to broker a peace between it and archrival India. The test, a single atomic explosion in the Baluchistan desert, followed Pakistan's claim of five detonations Thursday. The tests were intended to answer the five tests carried out by India earlier this month.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
India set off two more underground nuclear explosions Wednesday, defying overwhelming international condemnations, including President Clinton's decision to impose U.S. sanctions that could cost the Indians billions of dollars in aid. The Indian government said in a statement here that the underground tests complete the nation's nuclear program and indicated that it now stands ready to sign an international treaty banning nuclear tests.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | Associated Press
India has offered to sign a nuclear test-ban treaty in return for the lifting of economic sanctions imposed last year after it held nuclear tests, U.S. and Indian officials said Monday. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, stopped short of declaring a breakthrough in eight months of negotiations. India's offer came as rival Pakistan said it was willing to talk about its nuclear program with a U.S. envoy. The U.S.
NEWS
July 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
The United States is reviewing sanctions imposed on India after 1998 nuclear tests and they will likely be lifted after consultations with Congress, the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff said here Thursday. Indicating a substantial easing of the sanctions imposed by the Clinton administration, Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton said Washington is ready to resume military contacts and broaden defense cooperation with India. "Sanctions are being reviewed in Washington, even as we speak.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to prevent South Asia's escalating arms race from spiraling into war, the United States this week will launch an international effort to defuse the flash points underlying half a century of hostility, senior U.S. officials said Monday. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright will meet Thursday in Geneva with her counterparts from the four other permanent members of the U.N. Security Council. Until last month, the five nations were the world's only declared nuclear powers.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The latest in a series of nuclear weapons talks between the U.S. and India went well, but much work remains to be done, the U.S. envoy said in New Delhi. It was the third meeting between Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott and his Indian counterpart, Jaswant Singh, since India and neighboring Pakistan set off underground nuclear tests in May. The U.S. cut off aid and loans to India and called on New Delhi to sign the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Wednesday hailed India as a beacon for democracy and diversity, but he also told the nuclear-capable nation that weapons of mass destruction do not guarantee national security. "A nuclear future is not a more secure future," Clinton said in an address before the Indian Parliament--his latest bid to lessen the tensions between India and Pakistan, longtime rivals that captured the world's attention in 1998 by conducting tit-for-tat nuclear tests.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton opened his five-day tour of India on Tuesday by endorsing New Delhi's position on the volatile region of Kashmir, rejecting calls by longtime U.S. ally Pakistan to referee the dispute. Standing with Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee, Clinton implored the subcontinent's two nuclear-armed rivals to refrain from attacking each other across the 450-mile contested border known as the Line of Control.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the pageantry that will envelop President Clinton when he arrives here today to begin a weeklong tour of South Asia, a sobering task awaits him: stopping a war before it starts. The subcontinent's two nuclear-armed rivals, India and Pakistan, are embroiled in their worst relations in a quarter of a century. Fighting along their 450-mile disputed border, still covered in Himalayan snow, is raging with an intensity ordinarily reserved for summer.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After weeks of hand-wringing, the White House announced Tuesday that President Clinton will stop in Pakistan for talks with the country's military leadership during a five-day visit to South Asia later this month that will also take him to India, Pakistan's archrival.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
While arguments rage over trade relations with China, U.S. business and government are paying increased attention to another huge country and potential market: India. President Clinton's visit to India later this month will be followed in May by a Commerce Department tour that will bring U.S. manufacturers into contact with Indian business opportunities. India has never been prominent on the U.S. radar screen--not nearly as big and constant an issue as China.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Enough with this talk of millennia. Let's go back to taking things one year at a time. That's especially wise for Asia and for the American role there. A year is time enough for six separatist rebellions in Indonesia, five North Korean extortions, four Japanese governments, three Hong Kong court rulings pledging subservience to China, two Chinese political crackdowns and one (short-lived) Chinese opening--not to mention half a dozen switches in Asia policy by the Clinton administration.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under international pressure to curb nuclear tensions in South Asia, India indicated publicly for the first time Thursday that it aims to complete negotiations so a global nuclear test-ban treaty can go into effect within a year. But in an address at the U.N. General Assembly in New York, Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee did not specifically promise to sign the accord, a key component of international efforts to end the nuclear arms race.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After weeks of hand-wringing, the White House announced Tuesday that President Clinton will stop in Pakistan for talks with the country's military leadership during a five-day visit to South Asia later this month that will also take him to India, Pakistan's archrival.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. foreign affairs specialists are monitoring the potential for increased cooperation between Russia, China and India, amid a growing conviction in all three countries, especially after NATO's bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, that U.S. power must somehow be checked. Although agreeing that the three nations are far from coalescing into a pan-Eurasian, anti-NATO axis, the analysts remain concerned about what they call a nightmare scenario: an alliance that would bring together about 2.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The missiles that streaked across India and Pakistan this week highlighted the determination of the two South Asian countries to push ahead with their nuclear weapons plans--and the futility of U.S. efforts to stop them. On Sunday, Indian leaders proudly announced the successful test-firing of an advanced ballistic missile capable of delivering a nuclear warhead to targets in Pakistan and China.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|