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United States Foreign Relations Indonesia

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1995 | From Associated Press
Indonesian authorities announced Thursday they will not return a man to Los Angeles to face charges that he murdered three people and stashed their bodies in trunks held at a Northridge storage locker. Harnoko Dewantono "has to be tried in Indonesia," said Susilo Sudarman, Indonesia's coordinating minister for political and security affairs.
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NEWS
November 2, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Megawati Sukarnoputri, reflecting growing discontent among Muslims with the U.S.-led bombing of Afghanistan, called Thursday for a cease-fire and a negotiated end to the conflict. Megawati, whose country has the world's largest Muslim population, endorsed the U.S. war on terrorism before the bombing began. But she said protracted airstrikes and the killing of Afghan civilians could undermine international support for the campaign.
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NEWS
May 14, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, battered and embarrassed by bloody repression in Indonesia, has begun increasing the pressure on President Suharto's regime, but it is not going so far as to threaten to withhold economic aid. The killings of six student demonstrators Tuesday provoked Secretary of State Madeleine Albright to issue the strongest official U.S. condemnation of the repression and to call for meaningful political reform.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Megawati Sukarnoputri, the leader of the world's largest Islamic nation, left Monday for Washington to meet with President Bush as he attempts to build an international coalition against terrorism. Megawati, who was invited to the White House after she took office in July, will be the first Muslim chief executive to meet with Bush since terrorists attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon a week ago.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | Reuters
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright demanded Sunday that the Indonesian army stop "colluding" with militias against East Timorese in West Timorese refugee camps and warned that U.S. aid would remain suspended until the situation vastly improves. The U.S.-Indonesian relationship "cannot return to what has been a normal basis until these various issues are resolved," Albright said after talks with East Timorese leader Jose Alexandre "Xanana" Gusmao.
NEWS
May 25, 2000 | From Reuters
The United States has resumed military contacts with Indonesia to try to foster reform, the State Department said Wednesday, less than a year after Washington suspended the ties over violence in East Timor. Indonesian air force officers observed U.S. military exercises in Thailand this month, and Washington has authorized participation by Indonesian air force and navy personnel in a disaster relief exercise in July, U.S. officials said.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Copyright Infringement Enforcement Beefed Up: Criticized by the United States for doing little to counter computer software piracy, the nation pledged to step up controls on copyright protection. U.S Trade Representative Mickey Kantor was asked last month by software, music and film companies to target Bulgaria, Indonesia and Turkey for action on copyright protection.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week before a state visit by President Clinton, an Indonesian court Monday sentenced the leader of the country's largest independent labor union to three years in prison for allegedly inciting workers to violence earlier this year. Muchtar Pakpahan was the fourth senior official of the Indonesian Prosperous Labor Union to be sentenced to prison in connection with riots in the Sumatran city of Medan in April.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1997 | ART PINE and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton administration's decision to provide a $3-billion line of credit to Indonesia should help bolster U.S. credibility in the Far East and, the government hopes, douse the economic flames that have spread across the globe in the last few months. The United States also sought to add its voice in support of the demands of the 181-nation International Monetary Fund that, in return for financial help, troubled countries agree to significant reforms in the way their economies operate.
NEWS
March 27, 1988
Six Californians on a scuba-diving vacation apparently have been detained by Indonesian authorities for allegedly violating Indonesian territorial waters. The six, plus the British captain of the ship and at least one other diver from Australia, were aboard a boat that was boarded by Indonesian armed guards last Tuesday while sailing in the Indian Ocean off the island of Sumatra, according to wives of two of the divers.
NEWS
June 15, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has decided to restore some of the U.S. military ties with Indonesia cut by the Clinton administration during upheavals in East Timor in 1999, according to administration sources. The change is aimed at enabling the United States to regain influence with Indonesia's armed forces at a time of growing political tumult there. Indonesia, the world's fourth-most-populous country, is located along sea lanes that route oil from the Middle East to East Asia.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has all the makings of a Cold War thriller. An American tourist is arrested on espionage charges after photographing the bodies of people killed by police. A U.S. Navy destroyer sailing through the region is accused of running guns to restive locals. Protesters burn an American flag. Menacing groups of vigilantes search hotels for American tourists to warn them that they must leave the country. A threat of violence prompts the United States to close its embassy.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Defense Secretary William S. Cohen urged Indonesia on Monday to take quick action to disarm and disband militia gangs in West Timor or face isolation by the international community. After meeting with President Abdurrahman Wahid and other top officials, Cohen said Indonesia must prove by its actions that it will combat the ruthless paramilitary gangs responsible for killing three U.N. workers, including an American, earlier this month.
NEWS
May 25, 2000 | From Reuters
The United States has resumed military contacts with Indonesia to try to foster reform, the State Department said Wednesday, less than a year after Washington suspended the ties over violence in East Timor. Indonesian air force officers observed U.S. military exercises in Thailand this month, and Washington has authorized participation by Indonesian air force and navy personnel in a disaster relief exercise in July, U.S. officials said.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calm returned to the tourist island of Lombok on Thursday as the United States offered fresh assurances that it stands behind the government of President Abdurrahman Wahid and considers a stable Indonesia essential to the well-being of Southeast Asia. Lombok, just 20 miles east of the popular resort island of Bali, was rocked by three days of violence this week that left five people dead as Muslim attackers targeted Christian homes and churches.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | Reuters
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright demanded Sunday that the Indonesian army stop "colluding" with militias against East Timorese in West Timorese refugee camps and warned that U.S. aid would remain suspended until the situation vastly improves. The U.S.-Indonesian relationship "cannot return to what has been a normal basis until these various issues are resolved," Albright said after talks with East Timorese leader Jose Alexandre "Xanana" Gusmao.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
During a trip to Asia this spring, Vice President Dan Quayle engaged in a practice U.S. presidents and vice presidents have traditionally shunned: He lobbied foreign government leaders on behalf of specific American companies. While in Jakarta on May 1, Quayle at least twice brought up with senior Indonesian officials a pending effort by American Telephone & Telegraph to land a multimillion-dollar contract to manufacture telecommunications equipment in that country.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | Reuters
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Sunday that the United States was reviewing proposals for a war crimes tribunal for East Timor, where rampaging militias have killed civilians and destroyed property. "It's very important to have accountability," she said after meeting U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan in New York. "We have been looking at proposals that Mary Robinson has been making," she said, referring to the U.N. human rights commissioner.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For years, the Pentagon has spent millions on programs that aim not only to train fast-rising officers in foreign armies--including Indonesia's--but to plant in them the seeds of American values and influence. But after days of attempts to force the military leadership in Indonesia to halt the convulsion of violence in East Timor and allow United Nations peacekeepers to keep order, the sum total of this influence seems depressingly close to zero.
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