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NEWS
April 16, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton has decided to take on the job of leading the world's wealthy countries in organizing aid for Russia--but so far, he's having a hard time persuading others to follow. True, the seven leading industrial nations of the so-called Group of Seven did close their two-day meeting here with the announcement of a $43.4-billion aid package for Russia. But little of that was new money or outright gifts. Most of it consisted of debt rescheduling, loans and credit.
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NEWS
November 21, 1997 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
For 20 years, ever since Congress made it a crime for American citizens to bribe foreign officials, U.S. business leaders have complained of having to fight uphill against foreign competitors. Other industrial countries allow commercial bribery as a necessary part of winning foreign contracts, they pointed out, and some even make bribes tax deductible.
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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the luck of the draw, President Clinton was the last to speak at the opening session of the Group of Seven economic summit Wednesday. When his turn finally came at the closed-door meeting, he offered a political message to his fellow leaders: "We have got to make this thing relevant to ordinary people," a senior aide quoted Clinton as saying. That advice has much to do with Clinton's own political experience.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the luck of the draw, President Clinton was the last to speak at the opening session of the Group of Seven economic summit Wednesday. When his turn finally came at the closed-door meeting, he offered a political message to his fellow leaders: "We have got to make this thing relevant to ordinary people," a senior aide quoted Clinton as saying. That advice has much to do with Clinton's own political experience.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush declared last month that reinvigorating the stalled global trade-liberalization talks would be his No. 1 priority at this week's economic summit, he drew yawns and snickers around the world. Traditionally, Presidents have cared only about "big picture" political issues such as the environment and aid to the Soviet Union. Few have been willing to spend much personal capital on resolving murky trade disputes.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European delegates attending the economic summit agreed Wednesday that Europe, the United States and Canada have developed a reassuring capacity for pulling together, rather than apart as some had feared only a few months ago. The economic summit was "friendly and frank," according to the host, British Prime Minister John Major. "There was very strenuous discussion on a number of aspects of it. People did speak their minds clearly, comprehensively and on occasion in an unforgettable way."
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It took only 15 minutes to reach final agreement on the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty on Wednesday, but the handshake deal allowed President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to talk about the subject that was really on their minds: remaking the Soviet economy.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crack in the longstanding impasse between the United States and Europe over farm subsidies Monday came when West Germany broke ranks with its European partners to support President Bush in his campaign to move the current round of trade expansion talks off dead center. For West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, the desire to support the U.S.
NEWS
November 21, 1997 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
For 20 years, ever since Congress made it a crime for American citizens to bribe foreign officials, U.S. business leaders have complained of having to fight uphill against foreign competitors. Other industrial countries allow commercial bribery as a necessary part of winning foreign contracts, they pointed out, and some even make bribes tax deductible.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first seven-nation economic summit to be held since the end of the Cold War has barely gotten under way, but already it is providing a telling glimpse of how hard it will be for the allies to get along without the fear of the Soviet Bloc to unite them. Beneath the customary gloss of cosmetic diplomacy, this may go down in history as the Go-Your-Own-Way Summit. "It's a Go-Your-Own-Way and Do-What-You-Want sort of thing," says Carol A. Brookins, president of World Perspectives Inc.
NEWS
April 16, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton has decided to take on the job of leading the world's wealthy countries in organizing aid for Russia--but so far, he's having a hard time persuading others to follow. True, the seven leading industrial nations of the so-called Group of Seven did close their two-day meeting here with the announcement of a $43.4-billion aid package for Russia. But little of that was new money or outright gifts. Most of it consisted of debt rescheduling, loans and credit.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With this bustling Brazilian city braced for the arrival of 116 presidents and prime ministers, delegates to the 178-nation summit on the global environment and world development Wednesday night closed in on their last elusive agreements. Though differences persisted over financing language that had kept negotiators at work on Tuesday night until almost 4 a.m.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European delegates attending the economic summit agreed Wednesday that Europe, the United States and Canada have developed a reassuring capacity for pulling together, rather than apart as some had feared only a few months ago. The economic summit was "friendly and frank," according to the host, British Prime Minister John Major. "There was very strenuous discussion on a number of aspects of it. People did speak their minds clearly, comprehensively and on occasion in an unforgettable way."
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It took only 15 minutes to reach final agreement on the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty on Wednesday, but the handshake deal allowed President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to talk about the subject that was really on their minds: remaking the Soviet economy.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | JACK NELSON and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush said Monday that the United States has received solid support from its major allies for the military attack against Iraq that officials say is likely to come if a U.N. inspection team concludes that Saddam Hussein is still concealing elements of his nuclear weapons program. Bush told reporters that he has received expressions of "strong, strong support" for military action if it is warranted.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush declared last month that reinvigorating the stalled global trade-liberalization talks would be his No. 1 priority at this week's economic summit, he drew yawns and snickers around the world. Traditionally, Presidents have cared only about "big picture" political issues such as the environment and aid to the Soviet Union. Few have been willing to spend much personal capital on resolving murky trade disputes.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With this bustling Brazilian city braced for the arrival of 116 presidents and prime ministers, delegates to the 178-nation summit on the global environment and world development Wednesday night closed in on their last elusive agreements. Though differences persisted over financing language that had kept negotiators at work on Tuesday night until almost 4 a.m.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | JACK NELSON and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush said Monday that the United States has received solid support from its major allies for the military attack against Iraq that officials say is likely to come if a U.N. inspection team concludes that Saddam Hussein is still concealing elements of his nuclear weapons program. Bush told reporters that he has received expressions of "strong, strong support" for military action if it is warranted.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crack in the longstanding impasse between the United States and Europe over farm subsidies Monday came when West Germany broke ranks with its European partners to support President Bush in his campaign to move the current round of trade expansion talks off dead center. For West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, the desire to support the U.S.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first seven-nation economic summit to be held since the end of the Cold War has barely gotten under way, but already it is providing a telling glimpse of how hard it will be for the allies to get along without the fear of the Soviet Bloc to unite them. Beneath the customary gloss of cosmetic diplomacy, this may go down in history as the Go-Your-Own-Way Summit. "It's a Go-Your-Own-Way and Do-What-You-Want sort of thing," says Carol A. Brookins, president of World Perspectives Inc.
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