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United States Foreign Relations Iraq

NEWS
June 2, 2001 | Times Wire Services
The Bush administration removed curbs Friday on the sale of $800 million in goods to Iraq. The move was part of an effort to build credibility and support for a proposed major U.S.-British overhaul of the decade-old sanctions regime against Iraq, which is now being debated by the U.N. Security Council. The so-called dual-use items, which had been on hold out of concern that they might help Iraq's weapons programs, can now be sold to Baghdad for the benefit of the Iraqi people.
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NEWS
May 31, 2001 | From Associated Press
Seeking to end an impasse, the United States, Britain, France and Russia have reached a tentative agreement to put off for up to six months a United Nations decision on restructuring sanctions against Iraq, a senior Bush administration official said Wednesday. Iraq's current oil-for-food program, due to expire June 3, will be temporarily extended, primarily to give Russia a chance to scrutinize a proposed new list of banned items, the official said. The extension, to be put in the form of a U.N.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Iraq's traditional allies on the Security Council have pushed for years to ease sanctions on the country, now that change is in the air, they are suddenly dragging their feet. Russia, China and France said Tuesday that they need more time to consider new proposals introduced by Britain and backed by the United States to end the ban on exports to Iraq except for goods that could be used for military purposes. The U.S.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite millions of dollars in U.S. aid, the leading Iraqi opposition group has proved so hapless in making use of the money, accounting for it, finding recruits for Pentagon training and preventing its own fragmentation that the State Department is searching for alternatives. The Iraqi National Congress is also now so out of favor in the Arab world and in Turkey that all but one of the states bordering Iraq have made clear to Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and other U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, in his first appearance before a congressional foreign relations committee, reiterated firm U.S. support for Israel and Taiwan on Wednesday but stopped short of embracing new policies advocated by some lawmakers.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi officials were unmoved Tuesday despite Washington's declaration that it favors easing the United Nations' decade-long sanctions on Iraqi civilians. In the second day of talks with the U.N. aimed at breaking a two-year stalemate, Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohammed Said Sahaf said Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's notion of "smart sanctions" proved that the U.N.'s current policy was "stupid."
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
An Iraqi newspaper on Monday threatened Kuwait and Saudi Arabia for abetting U.S. and British airstrikes on Iraq, as Israel and the United States began a Patriot missile exercise reminiscent of the Persian Gulf War. About 11,000 Iraqis marched Monday in the capital, some burning American, British and Israeli flags and carrying banners declaring that "aggression will not scare us and sanctions will not harm us"--the latest in daily rallies since Friday's attack.
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scope of Friday's airstrikes on Iraq may have sent a strong signal about the Bush administration's resolve to squeeze the regime of Saddam Hussein, but Washington also may have played directly into the Iraqi leader's game plan. At its heart, Hussein's strategy in the decade since he was forced to retreat from his invasion of Kuwait has been to make Iraq appear a victim rather than a villain.
NEWS
February 17, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush, signaling that he intends to hold a tough line against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, ordered warplanes Friday to strike five air defense sites on the outskirts of Baghdad. Twenty-four U.S. and British planes hit command-and-control sites that Bush said posed a growing threat to U.S. fliers patrolling "no-fly" zones in the northern and southern sections of Iraq. "Saddam Hussein has got to understand . . .
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recent publicity about the first U.S. casualty of the 1991 Persian Gulf War has loosed an outpouring of new leads in the mysterious case, including information that could support the notion that the flier survived his crash and was taken prisoner by the Iraqis, according to a U.S. lawmaker. Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.), a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said the leads have come to light since last month, when Navy Lt. Cmdr.
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