Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Iraq
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Iraq

NEWS
November 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraq sent domestic passenger flights carrying 156 people into skies patrolled by U.S. and British warplanes, the first challenge of its kind to the "no-fly" zones that Iraq considers an infringement on its sovereignty. Iraq, which says the flights mark the resumption of regular passenger service, used converted cargo planes to take passengers to Basra in the southern no-fly zone and Mosul in the northern zone.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Bill Clinton and his weary advisors, it's a sobering thought: The president's foreign policy legacy may well be determined more by how he handles multiple crises during his last three months in office than by anything he's accomplished over the previous seven years.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dick Cheney, the Republican vice presidential nominee, accused the Clinton-Gore administration Wednesday of letting Saddam Hussein "slip off the hook" by failing to maintain the "robust" weapon-inspection program imposed upon Iraq after the Persian Gulf War. "We have not seen the kind of aggressive, effective leadership that President Bush provided . . . in terms of maintaining peace and civility in that part of the world," Cheney said at a boisterous campaign stop in Lancaster, Calif.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States warned Iraq that it stood ready to use military force if Baghdad threatens its neighbors, after Iraq accused Kuwait of stealing its oil and an Iraqi jet violated Saudi airspace. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Iraq's purpose may have been to confront the U.S. during the U.N. Millennium Summit. Speaking in New York, Albright warned Iraq that, if it rebuilt its arsenal or otherwise crossed U.S. "red lines," it risked a U.S. attack.
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
A second straight day of allied airstrikes over southern Iraq damaged a train station and several homes and injured at least three people, a senior Iraqi military officer said Sunday. The U.S. military said the aircraft targeted Iraqi air defense sites. British and U.S. warplanes attacked targets Saturday in Samawa, 170 miles south of Baghdad, a day after airstrikes in the same city that Iraq said killed two people and injured 19 others. Lt.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Police arrested 104 people Monday as they sat down in front of the White House to protest the crippling decade-old international sanctions against Iraq. Many of the 250 demonstrators at the White House and Treasury Department chanted, "Stop the killing of Iraqi children." Some held aloft loaves of bread and others held signs reading "Iraqi children Holocaust II" and "Remember Iraq."
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
The five nuclear powers on the Security Council agreed Saturday to eliminate their nuclear arsenals as part of a disarmament agenda agreed to by 187 countries. The agreement by the signatories to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, or NPT, was reached after all-night deliberations and intense pressure on Iraq and the United States to settle a dispute over Baghdad's compliance with U.N. sanctions.
NEWS
March 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
The United States agreed Friday to double the amount of money Iraq is allowed to spend repairing its oil industry and lifted "holds" on more than $100 million in electrical equipment, vehicles, truck batteries and other items destined for Iraq under an exemption to U.N. sanctions. The U.S. action came as the U.N. Security Council began an assessment of the humanitarian needs of ordinary Iraqis after nearly a decade of sanctions imposed in response to Iraq's 1990 invasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | Associated Press
Iraqis wept and demanded revenge Wednesday for a mortar strike on a Baghdad apartment building that killed at least four people, an attack that officials blamed on Iran and the United States. A senior Iraqi leader said that warming ties between Iran and the U.S. encouraged "Persian agents" to attack a residential quarter in the capital late Tuesday. Thirty-eight people were injured. "Revenge! Revenge! Revenge!" weeping women shouted as an angry crowd carried coffins through the streets.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Calling him a "mad dictator," the State Department said Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has been building palaces worth billions of dollars for himself and his supporters while protesting that his country is being impoverished by U.N. economic sanctions. In addition, U.S. spokesman James P.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|