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United States Foreign Relations Iraq

NEWS
February 18, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scope of Friday's airstrikes on Iraq may have sent a strong signal about the Bush administration's resolve to squeeze the regime of Saddam Hussein, but Washington also may have played directly into the Iraqi leader's game plan. At its heart, Hussein's strategy in the decade since he was forced to retreat from his invasion of Kuwait has been to make Iraq appear a victim rather than a villain.
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NEWS
February 17, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush, signaling that he intends to hold a tough line against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, ordered warplanes Friday to strike five air defense sites on the outskirts of Baghdad. Twenty-four U.S. and British planes hit command-and-control sites that Bush said posed a growing threat to U.S. fliers patrolling "no-fly" zones in the northern and southern sections of Iraq. "Saddam Hussein has got to understand . . .
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recent publicity about the first U.S. casualty of the 1991 Persian Gulf War has loosed an outpouring of new leads in the mysterious case, including information that could support the notion that the flier survived his crash and was taken prisoner by the Iraqis, according to a U.S. lawmaker. Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.), a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said the leads have come to light since last month, when Navy Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major test for the Bush administration's new foreign policy team, Syria has opened a key pipeline to Baghdad's oil, a scheme that generates at least $2 million daily in illicit funds for the regime of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, according to senior U.S. officials, Mideast diplomats and oil experts. The smuggling operation, launched in mid-November, is now the largest source of independent income for Baghdad, according to oil experts.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Still full of bluster 10 years after the Persian Gulf War, President Saddam Hussein pronounced the conflict a great moment in Iraq's history--ignoring his crushing military defeat and the country's withered economy. Hussein offered an apocalyptic account of the "mother of all battles" that made only passing reference to the U.S.-led bombing campaign launched Jan. 17, 1991, and the lopsided ground war that chased demoralized Iraqi troops out of Kuwait.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade after his father's administration launched a thundering air campaign against Iraq's Saddam Hussein, George W. Bush faces a regime in Baghdad that is stronger, more stubborn, more devious--and more successful at defying the United States. It's an extraordinary comeback given the collective might assembled against the Iraqi president, according to foreign policy experts and U.S. officials. Operation Desert Storm, which opened Jan.
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | Reuters
The Iraqi government, at a meeting chaired by President Saddam Hussein, agreed Monday to donate $94 million to impoverished Americans, said the official Iraqi News Agency. "The Cabinet decided, on humanitarian grounds, to allocate 100 million euros [about $94 million] to be distributed to poor Americans," INA said. The news agency said U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan would be notified of the donation.
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Responding to U.S. reports that a missing American pilot from the Gulf War may have survived the crash of his aircraft and been detained by the Iraqis, Baghdad divulged details of a 1995 search of a crash site in its western desert carried out by the U.S. military and the International Committee of the Red Cross. The team found part of the wreckage of Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | Times Wire Services
The Iraqi government Saturday dismissed as a "lie" fresh U.S. claims that a Navy pilot shot down over Iraq in the 1991 Persian Gulf War might still alive. "It is a new and cheap American lie," an Iraqi Ministry of Culture and Information spokesman said. "When the Iraqi Foreign Ministry reveals documents related to the subject, this lie will be an American scandal," the spokesman said in a statement carried by the official Iraqi News Agency.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. officials said Friday that they have no proof that a Navy pilot downed in the 1991 Persian Gulf War is alive but that they believe Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has collected evidence that would solve one of the lingering mysteries of the war. Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher, 33, who was downed on the first day of the air assault on Iraq, was officially reclassified from "killed in action" to "missing in action" this week. Fifteen U.S.
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