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NEWS
April 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration obtained advance support of American Jewish leaders before imposing new rules that had the effect of diverting most Soviet Jewish emigres from the United States to Israel, according to informed sources. Administration officials and Jewish leaders both said that the consultations defused what could have turned into a firestorm of controversy.
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NEWS
April 5, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that "enough is enough," President Bush announced Thursday that he is dispatching Secretary of State Colin L. Powell to the Middle East next week in a bold but risky bid to end the raging violence and get Israel and the Palestinians back to the peace table. "The storms of violence cannot go on," Bush said in a Rose Garden speech that included a series of stern messages for Palestinian and Israeli leaders as well as for regional players in the escalating crisis.
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NEWS
June 6, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir on Sunday refused to budge in his opposition to key elements of Secretary of State George P. Shultz's peace initiative, but Shultz vowed to continue his shuttle diplomacy even if his only remaining hope is to leave a "constructive and positive" Middle East picture for the next Administration.
NEWS
April 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
The text of President Bush's remarks Thursday on the Middle East, as transcribed by EMedia MillWorks Inc.: Good morning. During the course of one week, the situation in the Middle East has deteriorated dramatically. Last Wednesday, my special envoy, Anthony Zinni, reported to me that we were on the verge of a cease-fire agreement that would have spared Palestinian and Israeli lives.
NEWS
March 3, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mossad agents were on the run, winding through the crowded streets of Khartoum, one step ahead of Sudan's secret police and their Libyan allies. The Israeli spies had been betrayed by Sudanese informants, their cover as European businessmen blown and their station--disguised as a private business office--compromised. They had managed to salvage only their secret communications gear before speeding off into the dark. Their destination: Milton Bearden's house.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts to find a compromise that would keep Israel's divided government intact were deadlocked Monday, and officials close to Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir said that he is determined to assert his authority over dovish ministers in the teetering coalition. "The prime minister is standing firm," said Yosef Ben-Aharon, a top aide to Shamir.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | SHELDON TEITLEBAUM
Did Israeli intelligence know Iraq would invade Kuwait weeks before Saddam Hussein launched his blitz? Of course, it knew. It even shared that information with its U.S. allies, who were in a position to substantiate the warnings with a river of data culled from American satellites, National Security Agency listening posts and AWAC overflights. But the State Department had other ideas.
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | MARY CURTIUS and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The bizarre flight to Israel of a senior U.S. Army intelligence officer earlier this month has set off a scramble to avoid a spy scandal and prevent a rupture in U.S.-Israeli relations still sensitive over the Jonathan Pollard spy case of the mid-1980s. Lt. Col. Jeremiah Mattysse, until recently chief of the U.S. Army Reserve Southwest Intelligence Support Center, is being sought for questioning by U.S. authorities and faces charges of desertion and conduct unbecoming an officer, U.S.
NEWS
February 10, 1987 | United Press International
Four key figures in the scheme to sell U.S. arms to Iran in exchange for American hostages in Lebanon have agreed to give written answers to questions from U.S. investigators, Israel radio said Monday. None of the four--arms dealers Al Schwimmer and Jacob Nimrodi, Israeli terrorism expert Amiram Nir and former Israeli Foreign Ministry Director General David Kimche--could be reached for comment.
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years ago, in the face of mounting costs, the United States withdrew from an elaborate project to help build an advanced combat aircraft for Israel. The idea was scrubbed--or so it seemed. Now, to the consternation of U.S. officials, much of the American know-how and initial planning for the canceled "Lavi" fighter plane are about to be put to use in China. U.S.
NEWS
March 31, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush broke his silence on the Middle East crisis Saturday, telling Israel to follow "a path to peace" and demanding that Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat make clear his opposition to terrorism. Bush said that Arafat's security force must "do a much better job of preventing people from coming into Israel to blow up innocent people" and that the Palestinian leader must "stand up and condemn, in Arabic, these attacks." "These aren't just isolated incidents," Bush said.
NEWS
February 2, 2002 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has President Bush on Israel's side as he prepares to fly to Washington next week to coordinate policies on Iran and the Palestinian Authority. Sharon also has Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat right where he wants him, politically weakened and under military siege at his West Bank headquarters in Ramallah. The 73-year-old former general should be feeling his might.
NEWS
November 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon on Saturday canceled a trip to the U.S. this month, during which he was expected to meet President Bush, diminishing hopes for new momentum toward negotiations with the Palestinians. Violence continued, with Israeli tanks firing shells and heavy machine-gun fire at security posts in the Gaza Strip, killing a major in the Palestinian security forces at Deir al Balah, south of Gaza City, Palestinian police and hospital officials said.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, entangled in a rare public flap with the White House, has used American and Israeli newspapers to apologize for comments in which he suggested the United States was appeasing Arab states the way the West appeased Adolf Hitler on the eve of World War II. Sharon told the newspapers Saturday that he regretted he was misunderstood, and his aides said they were confident the dispute, which triggered an angry rebuke from Washington, was now put to rest.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon refused Tuesday to proceed on a U.S.-backed Middle East peace plan until the region is "completely quiet" and free of bloodshed for 10 days. Sharon laid down that timetable during an hourlong meeting at the White House with President Bush in which the prime minister detailed Palestinian violations of the cease-fire and the president insisted repeatedly that progress was being made in the Middle East. "I made clear that when violence and terror are over . . .
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abandoning the last vestige of his standoffish approach to the Middle East, President Bush on Wednesday directed Secretary of State Colin L. Powell to visit the region next week, just days after Israel's leader is scheduled to visit the White House. Administration officials said the objective of the intensified U.S. diplomacy is to persuade Israel and the Palestinians to abide by a shaky week-old cease-fire.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that he will "work closely with" any country willing to oppose Iraq, President Bush met here Friday with President Hafez Assad of Syria, a country the Administration has publicly labeled a major supporter of international terrorism.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with huge war-risk insurance premiums, ailing Pan American World Airways said Thursday that it would suspend for one week flights to Israel and Saudi Arabia. Pan Am's action is the most dramatic response yet by an airline to the increased danger of war in the Persian Gulf. Within the last few weeks, other airlines have quietly rerouted flights to avoid overnight stays in Israel. And a number of airlines have dropped service to Iraqi neighbor Jordan due to a sharp slide in tourism.
NEWS
June 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Two senior Bush administration officials worked in tandem Friday to try to hold together an Israeli-Palestinian cease-fire, with CIA Director George J. Tenet convening a security meeting and Assistant Secretary of State William Burns seeking to reopen a political dialogue. The meetings represented an intensification of U.S. diplomacy in the Israeli-Palestinian dispute despite the Bush administration's determination to avoid the deep involvement maintained by the Clinton administration.
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | From Associated Press
A car bomb that exploded Wednesday outside a high school in the coastal city of Netanya caused no serious injuries but threatened to unravel a newborn U.S. effort to put a lid on eight months of Palestinian-Israeli violence. Students at the Ort technical high school had finished an exam and left just 10 minutes before the bomb went off in front of the building, sending pieces of metal flying in all directions.
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