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United States Foreign Relations Japan

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NEWS
December 13, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why has the United States decided to crack down on suspected Japanese war criminals 50 years after granting them immunity from prosecution? Japanese scratched their heads last week at the unexpected announcement that the U.S. Justice Department had included former members of an infamous bacterial warfare research unit on a "watch list" of 16 suspected Japanese World War II war criminals prohibited from entering the United States.
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NEWS
November 26, 2001 | From Reuters
Amid protests, Japanese naval vessels left for the Indian Ocean on Sunday to provide logistical support for the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan, this country's first military deployment in a combat situation since World War II. Three ships from the Maritime Self-Defense Force set sail under sunny skies from Yokosuka naval base just south of Tokyo and from Kure and Sasebo naval bases in southwestern Japan.
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NEWS
December 7, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here, by a grove of cherry trees whose thick, dark canopy trembles with a flock of brilliantly white doves, stands the altar of Japanese militarism. The spirits of foot soldiers and generals, cannon fodder and war criminals are enshrined as deities in this place and rest eternally, without judgment, blame or sin. At Yasukuni Jinja, the "Shrine of the Nation at Peace," stoop-backed widows pray for the repose of their husbands who fell in Manchuria.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi urged the new U.S. ambassador to Japan to bolster discipline among American troops stationed in Okinawa after the arrest of an airman suspected of rape. The request came during a courtesy call that the new envoy, Howard H. Baker Jr., paid to Koizumi. Baker arrived in Japan last week. Air Force Staff Sgt. Timothy B. Woodland was arrested Friday on suspicion of rape.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a timid Japanese-American bride of a U.S. sailor 30 years ago, Yoshiko Harris said nothing when she noticed that the 900-pound brass bell hanging in the Port Hueneme naval museum had come from her native Okinawa. But she dreamed of someday sending it back. Last week, Harris, now 57, was among 50 American and Japanese citizens at a ceremony marking the return of the four-foot-high bell to Oshiro, a small Okinawan farming community in the village of Ozato-Son.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the other fiercely independent residents of the island of Okinawa, Aiko Tsujino took to the streets with her volunteer group to help gussy up downtown for the G-8 summit that begins this week. But when President Clinton arrives for the meeting of the world's leading industrialized nations, she'll have mixed feelings at best. "Of course we want to welcome Clinton warmly," said Tsujino, who opened her popular Yunangi tavern 30 years ago, when Okinawa was still a U.S. territory.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | JIM MANN and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They stood together as allies through 40 years of Cold War, but the United States, Germany and Japan are now discovering that the conflicts that divide them are growing as strong as the common concerns that once bound them together. On issue after critical issue, from the nature of the new world order to the bruising economic competition that will dominate the 1990s, the world's new Big Three find themselves increasingly at odds.
NEWS
September 21, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In perhaps a last-ditch attempt to attract critical Japanese funding, the Bush Administration is offering to make a reluctant Tokyo part owner of the $8.2-billion atom smasher to be built in Texas, officials said Friday. "We will be inviting them to essentially buy an equity position" in the high-energy physics project, White House science adviser D. Allan Bromley said. Such foreign share holding in a U.S.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
The setting was simple, the talk was plain, the warm hospitality was quintessentially black, female and culturally Southern--despite the Los Angeles location--and the food was catered by an outfit known as the Ghetto Gourmet. The women from Japan seemed to love it. But there were tense moments at the start. "Is Japan really anti-racist?" demanded a reporter for the Los Angeles Sentinel, the largest black-owned newspaper in the West.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Japanese negotiators reached tentative agreement Wednesday on the major elements of a set of sweeping new measures to help reduce the $49-billion U.S. trade deficit with Japan--including significant concessions by Japan toward opening its market to more imports. The 50-page document, which officials said still includes a few, relatively minor "loose ends," was being quickly reviewed by the Japanese Cabinet in time for another, presumably final negotiating session today.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top Navy admiral has decided against courts-martial in the Greeneville submarine disaster but will order the sub's captain to an administrative hearing that will force his departure from the service, Navy sources said Wednesday. In a decision that may be announced as soon as Friday, Adm. Thomas Fargo, commander of the Pacific Fleet, will conclude that the deadly collision between the submarine and a Japanese trawler was the result of unprofessional conduct by Cmdr.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | Associated Press
Three Japanese whaling boats returned home Wednesday after an Antarctic hunt amid growing international criticism of Tokyo's plan to expand whale catches in the North Pacific. The ships arrived at two ports after catching minke whales over a five-month period near Antarctica, said Tomoko Kuba, spokeswoman for Japan's Institute of Cetacean Research, which is funded by the government and sales of whale meat. A total of 440 minke whales were caught during the hunt, she said.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met with Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori on Monday, but the leaders did not come up with any specific measures to revive growth in the world's two largest economies. Senior U.S. officials said Bush advised Mori that Japan should not try to stimulate its economy by increasing exports--an approach that might harm American industries, such as automobiles, that compete with Japanese firms.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sinking of the Japanese training vessel Ehime Maru by the U.S. nuclear submarine Greeneville has highlighted differences in how the two nations manage similar crises. A look back at another accident involving a military submarine and a fishing vessel--this one in Tokyo Bay nearly 13 years ago--provides insight into Japanese expectations and how the Asian nation might have handled this year's accident off Hawaii had both parties been Japanese.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If granted "testimonial immunity," the captain of the attack submarine Greeneville promised Thursday to persuasively refute assertions that he hastily ignored safety procedures in the moments before the sub's deadly collision with a Japanese fishing vessel. Through his attorney, Cmdr. Scott D. Waddle offered to provide a court of inquiry with details about the Feb. 9 accident that "no other witness is able to testify to." In a letter to Adm.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a calm but agonized voice, the captain of the Japanese fishing vessel that was struck and sunk by a Navy submarine testified Wednesday about waiting in vain for the sub to mount a rescue effort for survivors adrift in choppy seas. Hisao Onishi told a court of inquiry that the Ehime Maru's crew members and students expected the Greeneville to help those who were tossed into the sea or forced to abandon ship in lifeboats as the trawler sank within 10 minutes.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
The Japanese Striking Force The Japanese carrier striking task force that attacked Pearl Harbor set sail from the Kuril Islands on Nov. 26. It was made up of six aircraft carriers, two battleships and had a support force of nine destroyers, one light cruiser, two heavy cruisers and eight tankers. Three I-class submarines were positioned in front of the task force to act as scouts. U.S. Ships That Missed the Attack Many ships of the U.S. fleet were not present at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1995 | JOHN O'DELL JILL LEOVY and GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Visions of $100,000 price tags on $50,000 Japanese luxury cars are pulling some Southern California shoppers into dealer showrooms to jockey for position ahead of threatened federal trade sanctions against 13 popular models. But at other dealerships, uncertainty and anxiety are more prevalent than crowded sales floors. A few dealers, like Steve Shuken of Vista Lexus in Woodland Hills, said sales shot up from two a day to five on Wednesday and that the tariff threat is driving the action.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a small Japanese town, the American admiral bowed his head in contrition before grieving family members hanging on his every word. In the middle of the Pacific, the submarine commander wept as he delivered personal letters of apology. For a nation where symbolism is important, the television images Thursday went a long way toward easing public anger and frustration over last month's horrifying collision of a U.S. nuclear submarine and a Japanese high school training ship.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special envoy from Washington delivered a personal apology Tuesday from President Bush to Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori for a U.S. submarine's collision with a Japanese trawler that left nine people missing and presumed dead. The envoy, Navy Adm. William Fallon, also met today with Cabinet ministers and the fathers of two of the students who apparently died in the crash to apologize for the Feb. 9 tragedy.
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