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United States Foreign Relations Japan

NEWS
May 5, 1999 | JIM MANN
No one paid much attention to Japanese Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi's visit here this week-except, undoubtedly, the Chinese and the Russians. Obuchi's trip demonstrated to them how the United States is attempting to redesign its old Cold War alliances for the future-not just in Europe, where NATO is fighting a new kind of war, but also in Asia, where America and Japan are quietly establishing new sorts of military links.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
When Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi of Japan meets with President Clinton in Washington on Monday, the two leaders will be trying to shore up the most important relationship in the world. That may sound like overstatement when war in Kosovo and tensions with China top the news. But the immediate fate of the U.S. and world economies and the long-term fate of Asia--the unification of Korea, the emergence of China--depend on how America and Japan handle their changing relationship.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's lower house of parliament approved long-awaited legislation today that spells out how this nation will assist U.S military forces in case conflict breaks out in its neighborhood. The guidelines for U.S.-Japan defense cooperation do not require Japan to change its "no war" constitution or to fight unless directly attacked.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When North Korea launched a crude satellite-bearing rocket in August, it was not just a remarkable technological achievement by one of the world's poorest and most isolated nations. The test-firing of the multistage ballistic missile, which disintegrated over the north Pacific, created a political and military fallout that stretched from Tokyo to Washington to Beijing.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a veil of deference, praise and joviality, the United States on Friday delivered a needle-sharp message to Japan: Your economy is deteriorating and you need to step up your game, for the good of Japan, Asia and the world. "Prospects for Japan look worse than they did a few months ago," Lawrence H. Summers, deputy Treasury secretary, told a packed news conference in Tokyo.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid rising political tensions on the Korean peninsula, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen urged Japanese leaders Thursday to get parliament moving on guidelines that would enable Japan to back up the United States in military conflicts in the Asia-Pacific region. But long-stalled action on the guidelines--which were signed by the two countries in September 1997 but still require approval by parliament--is no slam-dunk.
NEWS
December 23, 1998 | Associated Press
The U.S. armed forces returned a training ground on Okinawa to Japanese control Tuesday as part of an agreement to reduce the American military presence on the southern Japanese island. The Aha drill site--composed of 1,186 acres of land and 19,513 acres of water--is the first of 11 U.S. facilities to revert to Japan under a 1996 deal, regional defense official Kenji Fujimoto said. Washington has promised to eventually give back 20% of the territory in Okinawa occupied by U.S. troops.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Japan is stymieing American efforts to identify suspected war criminals by failing to cooperate with requests for information, U.S. officials have publicly charged--a statement that is certain to reignite questions about the sincerity of Japanese apologies for past war misdeeds. "Japan is the only country in the world from whom we seek assistance that does not provide it," Eli M.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hopes that President Clinton's trip to Asia would provide an escape from the seamy topic of his impeachment hearings dissolved Thursday when a Japanese woman asked him one of the toughest questions he has faced yet--at least publicly--about his affair with Monica S. Lewinsky. Prefacing her question by saying she would not forgive her husband for such behavior, a smiling Osaka homemaker asked Clinton how he had apologized to his wife and daughter and whether they had forgiven him.
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