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United States Foreign Relations Japan

NEWS
July 19, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the other fiercely independent residents of the island of Okinawa, Aiko Tsujino took to the streets with her volunteer group to help gussy up downtown for the G-8 summit that begins this week. But when President Clinton arrives for the meeting of the world's leading industrialized nations, she'll have mixed feelings at best. "Of course we want to welcome Clinton warmly," said Tsujino, who opened her popular Yunangi tavern 30 years ago, when Okinawa was still a U.S. territory.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2000 | Reuters
Japan and the U.S. say their long-running spat about telecom rates should be settled today, and that could lead to opening Japan's market and paving the way for a smooth meeting between their leaders before this week's Group of Eight summit. Apart from agreeing on the deadline, senior officials have given little clues on how "last-mile" interconnection rates charged by Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2000 | Reuters
Japan and the United States failed to reach accord in a telecommunications spat on promoting competition and slashing Japanese connection fees, a Japanese official said. Japanese and U.S. officials held three days of talks aimed at resolving the issue, currently the thorniest between the two powers on the trade front. "A considerable gap remains," a Japanese Foreign Ministry official said. He said the two sides would try to resolve the issue by the end of March.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2000 | By SONNI EFRON,
In a blunt ideological challenge issued on the eve of important trade talks with Tokyo, a senior U.S. official warned Tuesday that Japan must quickly throw open its protected industries--especially telecommunications--or become an also-ran in the global Internet economy. "A Japanese company today pays more for everything it needs to run its business--from telephone calls and Internet access to energy bills, office rent, construction materials and beyond--than its foreign competitors," said U.S.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Enough with this talk of millennia. Let's go back to taking things one year at a time. That's especially wise for Asia and for the American role there. A year is time enough for six separatist rebellions in Indonesia, five North Korean extortions, four Japanese governments, three Hong Kong court rulings pledging subservience to China, two Chinese political crackdowns and one (short-lived) Chinese opening--not to mention half a dozen switches in Asia policy by the Clinton administration.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
Despite its aversion to nuclear weapons, Japan allowed more American nuclear weapons on its territory during the 1950s and '60s than officials of either country have publicly acknowledged, according to declassified U.S. government documents. Nuclear weapons for U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Don't look now but Japan is developing a more independent military capability just in case its alliance with the United States should someday fall apart. That is the blunt conclusion drawn by the U.S. intelligence community in two reports over the last three months. These soberly written studies say that Japan is now "hedging its bets" by strengthening its security ties to the United States while preparing for a time when Japan may stand on its own.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | JIM MANN
No one paid much attention to Japanese Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi's visit here this week-except, undoubtedly, the Chinese and the Russians. Obuchi's trip demonstrated to them how the United States is attempting to redesign its old Cold War alliances for the future-not just in Europe, where NATO is fighting a new kind of war, but also in Asia, where America and Japan are quietly establishing new sorts of military links.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
When Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi of Japan meets with President Clinton in Washington on Monday, the two leaders will be trying to shore up the most important relationship in the world. That may sound like overstatement when war in Kosovo and tensions with China top the news. But the immediate fate of the U.S. and world economies and the long-term fate of Asia--the unification of Korea, the emergence of China--depend on how America and Japan handle their changing relationship.
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