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United States Foreign Relations Jordan

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NEWS
June 6, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir on Sunday refused to budge in his opposition to key elements of Secretary of State George P. Shultz's peace initiative, but Shultz vowed to continue his shuttle diplomacy even if his only remaining hope is to leave a "constructive and positive" Middle East picture for the next Administration.
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NEWS
October 24, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what would be the first U.S. free-trade pact with an Arab nation, White House officials today plan to sign a sweeping accord with the kingdom of Jordan as a way to strengthen a moderate ally in the Middle East peace process. The unusual pact also is the first to address criticisms that globalization exploits workers and degrades the environment. In a precedent-setting action, it contains provisions on both issues that could serve as starting points for talks with other nations.
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NEWS
October 27, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordan, once regarded as a massive gap in the trade-sanctions ring around Iraq, now is in full compliance with the U.N.-imposed embargo and is entitled to "generous" economic aid from the world community, the Bush Administration said Friday. The new assessment is a dramatic reversal of the Administration's earlier complaints that Jordan, for years Washington's closest Arab ally, had thrown in its lot with Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
King Abdullah II of Jordan, in his first visit to California since he took over the throne last year, told 1,000 audience members at a Beverly Hills luncheon Monday that he is encouraged by prospects for peace in the Mideast.
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | Associated Press
American-born Queen Noor of Jordan said Sunday that her husband is a loyal friend of the West, an experienced mediator for peace and an honorable man who is being misrepresented in the United States and pressured to take sides. "There has been a lot of disinformation about his motives," said Queen Noor, born Lisa Halaby of Washington, D.C., in an interview. "It has been very disturbing."
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, searching for ways to break the escalating cycle of Middle East violence, pledged Tuesday "personally to do anything I can" to save the peace process. But talks with King Hussein here produced little in the way of movement or new ideas, according to U.S. and Jordanian officials. The Clinton administration instead is throwing the ball back into the Israeli and Palestinian court.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Near a desert oasis that once was the headquarters of Lawrence of Arabia, a Jordanian air base is quietly being reconstructed this month to host nearly 1,500 U.S. Air Force troops and 34 F-16s that will soon start flying daily sorties over southern Iraq. U.S. warplanes based in the Jordanian desert to monitor Saddam Hussein's army? The very idea would have been unthinkable a few years ago.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a political gesture to Jordan, the Clinton Administration took the first steps Tuesday toward ending the allied naval blockade of the Red Sea that has been used to enforce the U.N. embargo against Iraq. In a terse announcement, the Pentagon said the Navy will temporarily suspend its inspection of merchant vessels outside the Jordanian port of Aqaba and instead allow agents of Lloyd's Register, a London-based firm, to verify contents of vessels after they dock.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thirty-nine Americans are being detained in a Baghdad hotel and 500 others have been blocked from leaving Iraq since Saddam Hussein's regime invaded Kuwait last week, the State Department reported Tuesday. Although a few Americans have managed to get out of occupied Kuwait, about 3,500 U.S. citizens are unable to depart because the main airport is closed and roads are blocked, department officials added.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush defended his Persian Gulf policy Wednesday, rejecting accusations by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein that the United States has created a "struggle between Arabs and Americans" and charges by critics at home that he has risked lives solely over the price of gasoline. Bush spoke at the Pentagon after a briefing from top defense officials, who told him that the huge U.S. military buildup in Saudi Arabia and the surrounding waters could cost an extra $1.
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | BOB DROGIN and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a setback for accused international terrorist Osama bin Laden, Jordanian authorities working with U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies indicted 28 of his followers Tuesday for allegedly plotting attacks against American tourists and others at sites across Jordan in December. The terrorist group allegedly planned to kill Westerners crossing into Jordan from Israel, to bomb a hotel popular with U.S.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Abdullah II, Jordan's new monarch, told President Clinton on Tuesday that he is determined to step into the role played so effectively by his late father, King Hussein, as catalyst in the troubled Mideast peace process. Clinton, who hopes to revive Israeli-Palestinian negotiations after the election of Ehud Barak as Israel's prime minister, welcomed Abdullah's offer of help, administration officials said.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, searching for ways to break the escalating cycle of Middle East violence, pledged Tuesday "personally to do anything I can" to save the peace process. But talks with King Hussein here produced little in the way of movement or new ideas, according to U.S. and Jordanian officials. The Clinton administration instead is throwing the ball back into the Israeli and Palestinian court.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing tension in the Middle East, Jordan's King Hussein is to meet President Clinton and other top U.S. officials today as part of desperate efforts to prevent the region's peace process from further unraveling. Hussein has maintained warmer relations with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu than any other Arab leader.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Near a desert oasis that once was the headquarters of Lawrence of Arabia, a Jordanian air base is quietly being reconstructed this month to host nearly 1,500 U.S. Air Force troops and 34 F-16s that will soon start flying daily sorties over southern Iraq. U.S. warplanes based in the Jordanian desert to monitor Saddam Hussein's army? The very idea would have been unthinkable a few years ago.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Following a tip from U.S. intelligence, Jordan intercepted a shipment of sophisticated missile parts destined for Iraq in violation of U.N. sanctions, Jordanian and diplomatic sources said. The sources said the seized equipment was for missile guidance systems, a clear breach of the ban on almost all Iraqi imports and a sign that work is continuing on intermediate-range missiles Iraq is no longer permitted to possess. The sources would not give the origin of the parts, but they were not U.S.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Hussein called Sunday for pan-Arab talks to augment a U.S.-Iraqi dialogue aimed at resolving the Persian Gulf crisis and to ensure that any resolution is linked to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. "We call for an Arab-Arab dialogue that is parallel to the American-Iraqi dialogue on the gulf crisis because the issue is one of prime concern to the Arabs," the king said in a speech to army officers.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, completing four days of intense high-level diplomacy, said Friday that growing numbers of countries are ready to consider the use of military force to end Iraq's invasion of Kuwait if peaceful means prove inadequate.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a political gesture to Jordan, the Clinton Administration took the first steps Tuesday toward ending the allied naval blockade of the Red Sea that has been used to enforce the U.N. embargo against Iraq. In a terse announcement, the Pentagon said the Navy will temporarily suspend its inspection of merchant vessels outside the Jordanian port of Aqaba and instead allow agents of Lloyd's Register, a London-based firm, to verify contents of vessels after they dock.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Jordan's King Hussein took a victory lap through Congress and the White House on Tuesday to celebrate the end of hostility between their countries. But the harsh realities of the Middle East quickly changed the focus to continuing disputes such as those between Israel and Syria.
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