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United States Foreign Relations Kazakhstan

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NEWS
November 24, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kazakhstan's decision to transfer half a ton of weapons-grade uranium to the United States involved months of top-secret negotiations, assembly of a garage-size processing facility in remote Ulba and a clandestine airlift, U.S. officials said Wednesday. Details of the operation, which was designed to prevent the uranium from falling into the hands of rogue Third World governments, were revealed Wednesday, a day after U.S.
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NEWS
November 24, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kazakhstan's decision to transfer half a ton of weapons-grade uranium to the United States involved months of top-secret negotiations, assembly of a garage-size processing facility in remote Ulba and a clandestine airlift, U.S. officials said Wednesday. Details of the operation, which was designed to prevent the uranium from falling into the hands of rogue Third World governments, were revealed Wednesday, a day after U.S.
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NEWS
May 19, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months after the Soviet Union's collapse, the Bush Administration believes that a deal is finally in sight to put the former superpower's giant nuclear arsenal under firm control of a single government--Boris N. Yeltsin's Russia. But every time agreement appears within reach, a last-minute problem arises.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has brought more than half a ton of highly enriched uranium to this country from Kazakhstan that otherwise might have found its way to Third World countries for use in nuclear weapons, U.S. officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The powerful president of Kazakhstan, the Soviet Union's second biggest republic, said Monday that he is strongly opposed to moving all of the country's nuclear weapons into the Russian Federation, a move Soviet military authorities have suggested to bring the arsenal under tighter control. "I am absolutely against having any single republic control all nuclear weapons by itself, irrespective of how large that republic might be," Kazakh President Nursultan A.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has told Ukraine and Kazakhstan that it will come to their aid diplomatically if Russia ever threatens them with nuclear weapons but will not promise to defend them with military force, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Tuesday. The two republics have promised to hand their nuclear weapons over to Russia, but in exchange they have asked Western countries for security guarantees--complaining that they will feel vulnerable to their giant nuclear-armed neighbor.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
PROMOTING A BOOM: With the breakup of the Soviet Union, Washington has become Sales Central for a batch of new ambassadors representing former Soviet republics. Their main mission: getting Yankee capitalists to invest in their once-Communist economies. . . . One of the busiest diplo-salesmen is Alim Djamourchine of Kazakhstan, a tennis-playing former engineering professor who has been fielding a dozen business proposals a day from American firms.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States recommended Friday that six former Soviet republics receive full membership in the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, a move that could make them eligible for billions of dollars in loans to ease their painful transition to market economies. "The dramatic developments in the former Soviet Union have created new opportunities and challenges for international financial cooperation," Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady said in a statement.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton pledged nearly $400 million in aid to oil-rich Kazakhstan on Monday after the former Soviet republic agreed to adhere to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and destroy its nuclear weapons. Clinton announced the economic assistance in a White House ceremony with Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev, who presented Clinton with documents formally acceding to the non-proliferation pact.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of dickering, the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan agreed Tuesday to give up all the nuclear weapons on its territory, a move that will leave Russia as the only nuclear power among the states of the former Soviet Union. Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev, who had argued earlier that his nation should be allowed to keep some long-range nuclear missiles, told President Bush in a White House meeting that he will accede to the U.S.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton pledged nearly $400 million in aid to oil-rich Kazakhstan on Monday after the former Soviet republic agreed to adhere to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and destroy its nuclear weapons. Clinton announced the economic assistance in a White House ceremony with Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev, who presented Clinton with documents formally acceding to the non-proliferation pact.
NEWS
December 14, 1993 | JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kazakh Parliament on Monday overwhelmingly ratified the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and hours later Vice President Al Gore announced that the United States will provide $84 million to assist in the destruction of Kazakhstan's nuclear arsenal. The action by the Kazakh Supreme Soviet followed a debate between reformers and former Communists over the future of the missiles, which conservatives see as a symbol of sovereignty.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
PROMOTING A BOOM: With the breakup of the Soviet Union, Washington has become Sales Central for a batch of new ambassadors representing former Soviet republics. Their main mission: getting Yankee capitalists to invest in their once-Communist economies. . . . One of the busiest diplo-salesmen is Alim Djamourchine of Kazakhstan, a tennis-playing former engineering professor who has been fielding a dozen business proposals a day from American firms.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | STEVEN GUTTERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the U.S. Embassy in this remote Central Asian capital holds a reception, two of its top officials sacrifice their desks to use as snack tables. If the diplomats want to call Washington, they must drive halfway across town to their "communications center"--a room in the Hotel Kazakhstan. And to pick up mail or glance at a Western newspaper requires a longer trip--2,000 miles across the steppes of Kazakhstan and Russia to Moscow.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of dickering, the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan agreed Tuesday to give up all the nuclear weapons on its territory, a move that will leave Russia as the only nuclear power among the states of the former Soviet Union. Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev, who had argued earlier that his nation should be allowed to keep some long-range nuclear missiles, told President Bush in a White House meeting that he will accede to the U.S.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months after the Soviet Union's collapse, the Bush Administration believes that a deal is finally in sight to put the former superpower's giant nuclear arsenal under firm control of a single government--Boris N. Yeltsin's Russia. But every time agreement appears within reach, a last-minute problem arises.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | STEVEN GUTTERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the U.S. Embassy in this remote Central Asian capital holds a reception, two of its top officials sacrifice their desks to use as snack tables. If the diplomats want to call Washington, they must drive halfway across town to their "communications center"--a room in the Hotel Kazakhstan. And to pick up mail or glance at a Western newspaper requires a longer trip--2,000 miles across the steppes of Kazakhstan and Russia to Moscow.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States will recognize the independence of some of the former Soviet republics in the next 10 days and probably will recognize all of them eventually, a senior Administration official said Friday. The official declined to set a timetable for establishing diplomatic relations but said the five republics that Secretary of State James A. Baker III visited this week--Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan--will be recognized "sooner rather than later."
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has told Ukraine and Kazakhstan that it will come to their aid diplomatically if Russia ever threatens them with nuclear weapons but will not promise to defend them with military force, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Tuesday. The two republics have promised to hand their nuclear weapons over to Russia, but in exchange they have asked Western countries for security guarantees--complaining that they will feel vulnerable to their giant nuclear-armed neighbor.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States recommended Friday that six former Soviet republics receive full membership in the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, a move that could make them eligible for billions of dollars in loans to ease their painful transition to market economies. "The dramatic developments in the former Soviet Union have created new opportunities and challenges for international financial cooperation," Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady said in a statement.
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