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NEWS
July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading political dissident who had taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy here from a government crackdown last week left the country late Wednesday under U.S. auspices, the embassy said. Gibson Kamau Kuria, 43, a lawyer, was one of the most prominent opposition figures still at large after a police roundup of proponents of a multi-party system here when he sought temporary asylum in the embassy and asked for assistance in leaving the country.
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NEWS
October 23, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Friday that Kenyan President Daniel Arap Moi seems to be moving his country toward true democracy after more than two decades as autocratic head of a single-party state. Speaking at a news conference here with Moi at her side, Albright said the Kenyan leader pledged to quickly and fairly complete constitutional reforms and open up the country's economy. Albright also said Moi agreed to contribute Kenyan troops to the U.S.
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NEWS
July 9, 1990
In reply to your June 23 article: "Moratorium Imposed on DWP Tours": I commend Bradley in his attempt to make DWP an honest and responsible agency. However, I must warn the mayor to keep a close eye on DWP officials, as they are very adept at skirting agreements, moratoriums, laws, etc., After all, they've had nearly 100 years of practice here in the Owens Valley. Also, Mayor Bradley, if you think about it, its initials give us clues to its true character.
NEWS
August 7, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a miracle that Lucky Wavai was ever born. His mother, seven months pregnant, was seriously injured in last year's bombing of the U.S. Embassy here when chunks of glass were blasted into her stomach. She wanted to terminate the pregnancy because she feared that her baby was already dead. Today, Lucky's right limbs remain slightly paralyzed. Doctors fear possible brain damage. And loud noises terrify him.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | Reuters
President Daniel Arap Moi will begin a three-day private visit to the United States on Monday, diplomats said Thursday. Pro-Western Kenya is one of Washington's closest allies in Africa, and the U.S. Navy has base facilities at the Kenyan port of Mombasa.
NEWS
March 18, 1987
Kenyan President Daniel Arap Moi, returning from an eight-day trip to the United States and Britain that was marred by reports of human rights abuses in his country, brushed aside allegations of torture as "dirty words" and "filthy stories." In a 30-minute speech to officials and diplomats, Moi said his government has a sound record on human rights. He denied foreign press reports that the country holds 300 political prisoners and said there are only 11.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
President Daniel Arap Moi returns home today from a surprisingly cool reception in Washington that Western diplomats here attribute to the sharp deterioration of Kenya's human rights situation in the last year. What was supposed to be a chummy visit by Moi, a longtime ally of the United States, turned sour last week when the State Department pressed him for an investigation into recent allegations of beatings and torture of political dissidents in Kenya.
NEWS
August 7, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a miracle that Lucky Wavai was ever born. His mother, seven months pregnant, was seriously injured in last year's bombing of the U.S. Embassy here when chunks of glass were blasted into her stomach. She wanted to terminate the pregnancy because she feared that her baby was already dead. Today, Lucky's right limbs remain slightly paralyzed. Doctors fear possible brain damage. And loud noises terrify him.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of this nation's Islamic community accused the United States on Monday of pressuring Kenyan authorities to clamp down on Muslim organizations, which they say are wrongly suspected of possible involvement in last month's bombing of the U.S. Embassy here. The outcry by Muslim leaders follows last week's decision by the government to ban 16 primarily Muslim organizations for security reasons and for allegedly overstepping their permitted activities.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Kenyan governments on Friday averted a showdown over an American relief airlift to Somalia and northern Kenya, clearing the way for two flights during the day to aid refugees and displaced persons in Kenyan camps. But there was still no indication of when the first flights might be made into Somalia, where more than 1.5 million people face imminent starvation. The Kenya-U.S. agreement came a day after Kenya protested what it called a violation of its airspace by U.S.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of this nation's Islamic community accused the United States on Monday of pressuring Kenyan authorities to clamp down on Muslim organizations, which they say are wrongly suspected of possible involvement in last month's bombing of the U.S. Embassy here. The outcry by Muslim leaders follows last week's decision by the government to ban 16 primarily Muslim organizations for security reasons and for allegedly overstepping their permitted activities.
NEWS
August 19, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright promised Africans on Tuesday that the bombings of U.S. embassies here and in Nairobi, Kenya, will not weaken American resolve to build a "strong new relationship" with the continent. In a one-day trip to the two African capitals where more than 250 people were killed in the terrorist attacks, Albright also offered vague assurances that the United States will compensate victims of the bombings--Kenyans, Tanzanians and Americans.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Kenyan governments on Friday averted a showdown over an American relief airlift to Somalia and northern Kenya, clearing the way for two flights during the day to aid refugees and displaced persons in Kenyan camps. But there was still no indication of when the first flights might be made into Somalia, where more than 1.5 million people face imminent starvation. The Kenya-U.S. agreement came a day after Kenya protested what it called a violation of its airspace by U.S.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities broke up a Kenyan pro-democracy rally Saturday by arresting six of its organizers as they arrived at the Nairobi site. Thousands of onlookers were dispersed with tear gas, clubs and gunfire. The action by Kenyan police and government paramilitary units brought to 14 the number of opposition political leaders arrested in a two-day crackdown. At least one onlooker was shot in the thigh Saturday during skirmishes near the meeting grounds.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now, the affair of the "sinister" schoolbooks. U.S. Ambassador Smith Hempstone is under attack here for donating a package of textbooks, including autobiographies of some seminal American black figures, to a dirt-poor government school during a tour of the Kenyan countryside in late January. The books have been seized by the local police and termed "sinister" by the area's member of Parliament. They have become the occasion for a new outburst of anti-U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading political dissident who had taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy here from a government crackdown last week left the country late Wednesday under U.S. auspices, the embassy said. Gibson Kamau Kuria, 43, a lawyer, was one of the most prominent opposition figures still at large after a police roundup of proponents of a multi-party system here when he sought temporary asylum in the embassy and asked for assistance in leaving the country.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now, the affair of the "sinister" schoolbooks. U.S. Ambassador Smith Hempstone is under attack here for donating a package of textbooks, including autobiographies of some seminal American black figures, to a dirt-poor government school during a tour of the Kenyan countryside in late January. The books have been seized by the local police and termed "sinister" by the area's member of Parliament. They have become the occasion for a new outburst of anti-U.S.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kenyan government, firing back at American protests over a crackdown on opposition leaders, on Monday accused the United States of "gross interference in the affairs of this country" and of assisting subversives "bent on destabilizing the constitutionally elected government of Kenya."
NEWS
July 9, 1990
In reply to your June 23 article: "Moratorium Imposed on DWP Tours": I commend Bradley in his attempt to make DWP an honest and responsible agency. However, I must warn the mayor to keep a close eye on DWP officials, as they are very adept at skirting agreements, moratoriums, laws, etc., After all, they've had nearly 100 years of practice here in the Owens Valley. Also, Mayor Bradley, if you think about it, its initials give us clues to its true character.
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