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NEWS
September 2, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After six years of leading the world community against Iraq, the United States almost cannot avoid responding to the latest aggression by President Saddam Hussein--his assault on the Kurdish enclave in the north of Iraq. Washington once again may be forced to act--despite an array of complicating factors and a growing frustration in the U.S. that a short war five years ago turned into an open-ended commitment--or risk that Hussein will finally win a round in their long-standing confrontation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has emerged from his latest confrontation with the United States politically stronger than he was even six weeks ago, Central Intelligence Agency Director John M. Deutch said Thursday. Deutch's assessment, delivered in testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee, appeared to take the edge off President Clinton's repeated assertions that the recent round of U.S. military actions has left Hussein "strategically worse off" than he was before.
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NEWS
September 2, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton administration prepared Sunday for what looked likely to be a military response to Iraq's invasion of its U.S.-protected Kurdish north, amid claims that Saddam Hussein's Republican Guard had massacred nearly 100 army defectors and launched new attacks in the region. U.S.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On at least three occasions in the past year, Iraqi groups opposed to President Saddam Hussein approached the United States with a plan to prevent the Kurds of northern Iraq from dissolving into factional warfare, according to senior U.S. officials and Iraqi opposition leaders. But the idea of providing $2 million--less than the price of two cruise missiles--for a peacekeeping force drawn from a multiethnic Iraqi coalition already funded by the CIA became bogged down in U.S.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the surprise of practically no one in Washington, Saddam Hussein basically didn't blink. Even as the Iraqi president appeared to be withdrawing at least some of his troops from the Kurdish city of Irbil, new dust-ups in the air underscored the challenges ahead as U.S. troops seek to enforce the newly expanded "no-fly" zone that President Clinton ordered over southern Iraq.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Wednesday that Iraq appeared to be withdrawing its troops from Irbil, the Kurdish city that Iraqi forces invaded last week, but he cautioned that "it's too soon to say" whether the pullback will be "permanent." Declaring the two rounds of U.S. missile strikes against Iraq on Tuesday and Wednesday a success, Clinton said Iraqi President Saddam Hussein "now knows that there is a price to pay for stepping over the line" set by the United Nations and the Western allies.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a day of intensive diplomacy and last-minute crisis meetings, the United States launched cruise missiles at "selected air defense targets" in Iraq, the Pentagon said today. The action came hours after administration sources said that President Clinton had approved a directive authorizing military and economic retribution against Iraq for its invasion of Kurdistan.
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of Iraq's invasion of its Kurdish north and the U.S. response, the breakup of Kurdistan has begun. The fragmentation of the rugged and remote northern Iraqi enclave creates opportunities that are already being exploited by neighboring Iran and Turkey, creating even more volatility in the region. And, as a result, a complex situation could soon become even messier.
NEWS
August 31, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned about ominous movements by Iraqi troops, President Clinton ordered the U.S. military Friday to prepare for possible action in the Persian Gulf region, the White House said. The United States increased its flights over both Kurdistan in Iraq's north and the Shiite areas of the south and was considering dispatching an Air Force expeditionary unit--up to 30 aircraft and 1,000 support troops--to block aggression by the regime of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, Pentagon officials said.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration's new strategy on Iraq marks a long-avoided and potentially risky turning point in the two nations' six-year confrontation as the United States extends its line in the sand right up to Baghdad. "The United States is no longer willing to act just around the periphery of Iraq--in the Kurdish north or the Shiite south," a Pentagon official said Tuesday. "We are now prepared to respond with attacks to the center."
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of Iraq's invasion of its Kurdish north and the U.S. response, the breakup of Kurdistan has begun. The fragmentation of the rugged and remote northern Iraqi enclave creates opportunities that are already being exploited by neighboring Iran and Turkey, creating even more volatility in the region. And, as a result, a complex situation could soon become even messier.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the surprise of practically no one in Washington, Saddam Hussein basically didn't blink. Even as the Iraqi president appeared to be withdrawing at least some of his troops from the Kurdish city of Irbil, new dust-ups in the air underscored the challenges ahead as U.S. troops seek to enforce the newly expanded "no-fly" zone that President Clinton ordered over southern Iraq.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Wednesday that Iraq appeared to be withdrawing its troops from Irbil, the Kurdish city that Iraqi forces invaded last week, but he cautioned that "it's too soon to say" whether the pullback will be "permanent." Declaring the two rounds of U.S. missile strikes against Iraq on Tuesday and Wednesday a success, Clinton said Iraqi President Saddam Hussein "now knows that there is a price to pay for stepping over the line" set by the United Nations and the Western allies.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration's new strategy on Iraq marks a long-avoided and potentially risky turning point in the two nations' six-year confrontation as the United States extends its line in the sand right up to Baghdad. "The United States is no longer willing to act just around the periphery of Iraq--in the Kurdish north or the Shiite south," a Pentagon official said Tuesday. "We are now prepared to respond with attacks to the center."
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. forces today struck Iraqi targets for a second time as part of an operation that President Clinton pledged would continue until Iraqi President Saddam Hussein complies with standards of international conduct. Pentagon sources said that 17 cruise missiles were launched from four Navy vessels at about 3 a.m. Iraqi time today. "This operation is designed to eliminate sites not destroyed in Tuesday morning's initial cruise missile attack," the White House said in a terse statement.
NEWS
September 4, 1996
"You, the men of the air defense and the eagles of the sky ... from now on, pay no attention to damned imaginary no-fly zones." --Saddam Hussein in speech on Iraqi television **** "Our objectives are limited but clear: to make [Iraqi President] Saddam [Hussein] pay a price for the latest act of brutality, reducing his ability to threaten his neighbors and America's interests."
NEWS
September 1, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton put American forces in the Persian Gulf on "high alert" Saturday and dispatched reinforcements to the region after Iraqi President Saddam Hussein launched a massive dawn offensive that quickly overran a key Kurdish city in U.S.-protected northern Iraq. The assault was conducted by tank divisions consisting of more than 30,000 members of Iraq's elite Republican Guard, according to Kurds and U.N. officials in the region.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On at least three occasions in the past year, Iraqi groups opposed to President Saddam Hussein approached the United States with a plan to prevent the Kurds of northern Iraq from dissolving into factional warfare, according to senior U.S. officials and Iraqi opposition leaders. But the idea of providing $2 million--less than the price of two cruise missiles--for a peacekeeping force drawn from a multiethnic Iraqi coalition already funded by the CIA became bogged down in U.S.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a day of intensive diplomacy and last-minute crisis meetings, the United States launched cruise missiles at "selected air defense targets" in Iraq, the Pentagon said today. The action came hours after administration sources said that President Clinton had approved a directive authorizing military and economic retribution against Iraq for its invasion of Kurdistan.
NEWS
September 2, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After six years of leading the world community against Iraq, the United States almost cannot avoid responding to the latest aggression by President Saddam Hussein--his assault on the Kurdish enclave in the north of Iraq. Washington once again may be forced to act--despite an array of complicating factors and a growing frustration in the U.S. that a short war five years ago turned into an open-ended commitment--or risk that Hussein will finally win a round in their long-standing confrontation.
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