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United States Foreign Relations Kyrgyzstan

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NEWS
October 17, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), just back from his last trip abroad as a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, says he will spend his retirement promoting U.S. support for an unlikely recipient--the government of Kyrgyzstan, a former Soviet republic in a remote corner of Central Asia. "I am determined to do what I can to help him," Cranston said of Kyrgyz President Askar Akayev. Cranston visited Kyrgyzstan and two other central Asian republics, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan, last month.
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NEWS
December 18, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One child huddles in the corner of an empty room. Others grope for crumbs on the dusty floor. All of them are naked and very thin. Wordless screaming echoes behind them, and meaningless smiles play on their bruised, sore-covered faces. These are video images shown last month on Russia's commercial television channel, NTV. They show conditions in a home for mentally retarded children in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan.
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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States recommended Friday that six former Soviet republics receive full membership in the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, a move that could make them eligible for billions of dollars in loans to ease their painful transition to market economies. "The dramatic developments in the former Soviet Union have created new opportunities and challenges for international financial cooperation," Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady said in a statement.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), just back from his last trip abroad as a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, says he will spend his retirement promoting U.S. support for an unlikely recipient--the government of Kyrgyzstan, a former Soviet republic in a remote corner of Central Asia. "I am determined to do what I can to help him," Cranston said of Kyrgyz President Askar Akayev. Cranston visited Kyrgyzstan and two other central Asian republics, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan, last month.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States will recognize the independence of some of the former Soviet republics in the next 10 days and probably will recognize all of them eventually, a senior Administration official said Friday. The official declined to set a timetable for establishing diplomatic relations but said the five republics that Secretary of State James A. Baker III visited this week--Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan--will be recognized "sooner rather than later."
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One child huddles in the corner of an empty room. Others grope for crumbs on the dusty floor. All of them are naked and very thin. Wordless screaming echoes behind them, and meaningless smiles play on their bruised, sore-covered faces. These are video images shown last month on Russia's commercial television channel, NTV. They show conditions in a home for mentally retarded children in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States recommended Friday that six former Soviet republics receive full membership in the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, a move that could make them eligible for billions of dollars in loans to ease their painful transition to market economies. "The dramatic developments in the former Soviet Union have created new opportunities and challenges for international financial cooperation," Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady said in a statement.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States will recognize the independence of some of the former Soviet republics in the next 10 days and probably will recognize all of them eventually, a senior Administration official said Friday. The official declined to set a timetable for establishing diplomatic relations but said the five republics that Secretary of State James A. Baker III visited this week--Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan--will be recognized "sooner rather than later."
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