Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Latin America
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Latin America

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ecuadorean artist Oswaldo Guayasamin began his ascent toward world renown thanks to Nelson Rockefeller and the State Department, but he has no friends these days in the U.S. Embassy. Although French President Francois Mitterrand visited his home last month, and Mitterrand's wife is a regular house guest, some Americans denounce him as a leftist ingrate guilty of a perfidious insult to the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 7, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pessimism in the world financial community over whether Latin America's sickly economies can claw their way out of recession any time soon has sent the region's stock markets reeling and interest rates soaring in recent weeks. A regionwide recovery was expected by late this year, but political worries and the prospect of a U.S. slowdown have economists now forecasting that Latin America may take longer to rebound.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress indicated Thursday that it will act promptly to approve the $1.1-billion package of aid to Panama that President Bush has proposed, providing what the President called "as close to instant relief as we can hope" for Panama's battered economy.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As leaders of 34 nations gathered here for the second Summit of the Americas, White House officials Saturday pressed a series of measures to preserve political freedom and ensure that the region's fledgling democracies do not backslide toward a darker past.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American leaders, even those who shared Washington's aim of ending Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's dictatorship in Panama, overwhelmingly condemned the U.S. military invasion there Wednesday and refrained from recognizing his American-installed successor. After a flurry of urgent telephone consultations begun before dawn, officials across the Western Hemisphere declared that the Bush Administration had violated their cherished principle of nonintervention.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I view this as very, very important diplomacy," President Bush said recently as he unveiled a new mission for Vice President Dan Quayle. The words Bush used to heighten the diplomatic standing of a series of three trips Quayle is to make to Central and South America over the next two months apply equally to the political importance of the trips for Quayle--and perhaps for Bush himself. Details of the journeys are likely to be announced today.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pessimism in the world financial community over whether Latin America's sickly economies can claw their way out of recession any time soon has sent the region's stock markets reeling and interest rates soaring in recent weeks. A regionwide recovery was expected by late this year, but political worries and the prospect of a U.S. slowdown have economists now forecasting that Latin America may take longer to rebound.
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and the leaders of 33 other Western Hemisphere nations will set a goal of creating a free-trade zone joining the United States, Canada and all of Latin America when they meet this weekend in Miami in the first hemisphere-wide summit conference in a generation, officials said Monday. Clinton Administration officials said that the most difficult issue to resolve in establishing the goal is a target date.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The goal could hardly be grander, more ambitious or more specific: the establishment of a free-trade zone of unprecedented scope, making it no more taxing, in terms of duties and quotas, to sell an Iowa-built refrigerator in Argentina than it is to sell the same productin Alabama.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Embarking on what President Clinton called a "historic step," the United States and 33 other nations of the Western Hemisphere agreed Saturday to complete complex negotiations within a decade to eliminate all tariffs and other barriers to free trade from the Arctic to Argentina.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Delta Air Lines Inc. on Wednesday unveiled major expansion plans in a move it said will make it the dominant carrier between the United States and Latin America. The third-largest U.S. airline plans to add five daily flights in April to Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Panama and Venezuela, doubling service from five daily Latin American flights today. Also, it filed for U.S.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday hailed a new partnership with Argentina on global warming and the environment, capping a weeklong bid to win the trust of South Americans who long have viewed the United States as a go-it-alone bully. Against a backdrop of the snowcapped Andes jutting into a crystal-blue sky, Clinton cited the "broad and deep partnership" reached with Argentine President Carlos Menem on climate change issues.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
In this famed playground for the rich and famous, Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower caught the largest trout of their lives. Walt Disney artists copied enchanting forest backdrops for Bambi. Even Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid camped in Cholila Valley for a time. A resort boasts of one of Argentina's most challenging golf courses. On Friday, President Clinton came here, golf clubs in tow.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing near the burial place of the continent's revered liberator, President Clinton on Monday told the people of this South American nation that they are "friends and partners" of the United States in a battle to fight drugs, expand social justice and protect the environment of the Western Hemisphere.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Air Force One touched down here, the president of the United States stepped onto hostile and uncertain turf. It was 1990: President Bush visited Argentina a day after a failed military rebellion culminated in a firefight in front of the presidential palace. The region was struggling to shake off a history of tyranny and political and economic turmoil. Anti-Americanism was so virulent that Argentine Congress members tried to declare Bush persona non grata.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether poring over ancient artifacts, singing Spanish tunes with Mexican children or touring a tropical rain forest during a steady shower, President Clinton has managed to escape the pressures of the issues facing him on his Latin American journey and relax. The president's enthusiasm for his travels was especially evident in Mexico, the first stop of his weeklong journey.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Say it loud or say it soft, it's never going to roll off anyone's tongue: FTAA, pronounced "ftaah." That's the acronym for the name U.S. and other negotiators came up with for the trading zone they plan to build among the nations of the Western Hemisphere: the Free Trade Area of the Americas. Earlier, officials had expected the new pact to be dubbed the Americas Free Trade Area, which produces a more mellifluous AFTA.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday hailed a new partnership with Argentina on global warming and the environment, capping a weeklong bid to win the trust of South Americans who long have viewed the United States as a go-it-alone bully. Against a backdrop of the snowcapped Andes jutting into a crystal-blue sky, Clinton cited the "broad and deep partnership" reached with Argentine President Carlos Menem on climate change issues.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unlike his recent predecessors, President Clinton never crossed south of the Rio Grande during his first term. The president's failure to visit Latin America has revived a time-honored lament among Latin American diplomats and analysts: Despite a history of U.S. intervention in its historic "backyard," despite economies and cultures that are increasingly intertwined, the U.S. government largely ignores the region, critics say.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most tangible symbol that Argentina has moved into a new era may be at a 4,000-acre compound on the outskirts of town that was once strictly off limits. A billboard used to warn: "Do not park, do not stop, or soldiers will shoot." Today, however, the beige barracks off Entrance No. 4 at Campo de Mayo, Argentina's largest military base, are home to the new International Peacekeeping Academy. And anyone is welcome. "This is a growth industry," boasts Col.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|