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NEWS
July 7, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton pledged Wednesday to push Russia to remove the last of its troops from the Baltics "in a deliberate and firm way," while also warning that the rights of the Russian minority in this region must be protected. Opening an eight-day European trip with the first visit of an American President to this portion of the former Soviet empire, Clinton met with the presidents of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.
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NEWS
July 7, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton pledged Wednesday to push Russia to remove the last of its troops from the Baltics "in a deliberate and firm way," while also warning that the rights of the Russian minority in this region must be protected. Opening an eight-day European trip with the first visit of an American President to this portion of the former Soviet empire, Clinton met with the presidents of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia.
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NEWS
August 27, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, the United States has championed the cause of Baltic independence, steadfastly refusing to acknowledge the annexation of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania by the Soviet Union and granting their representatives the sort of diplomatic presence they were denied by much of the rest of the world.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle on Thursday pledged American support for the three Baltic states and announced $18 million in additional U.S. aid to them. Quayle, arriving from Finland, expressed America's support for Estonia which, with Latvia and Lithuania, regained independence from the Soviet Union in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1989
Five UCLA medical students are visiting the Soviet Union as part of an exchange program aimed at improving world peace, school officials say. The trip is the first activity between the Westwood university and its new sister school--Riga Medical Institute in Latvia. During their two-week trip, the students will examine the Soviet health-care system and participate in social activities. They are to return on July 24.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Secretary of State James A. Baker III failed to break a logjam in arms control talks Friday and disagreed over whether the United States is free to use military force in Iraq. But they still expressed confidence that U.S.-Soviet relations are slowly improving after what Gorbachev called "an uneasy period."
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle on Thursday pledged American support for the three Baltic states and announced $18 million in additional U.S. aid to them. Quayle, arriving from Finland, expressed America's support for Estonia which, with Latvia and Lithuania, regained independence from the Soviet Union in September.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush told the presidents of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania on Tuesday that he will exert U.S. pressure on the fraying central government of the Soviet Union to remove thousands of Soviet troops from the newly independent Baltic republics. "All three presidents did ask (Bush) for his support . . . in getting Soviet troops out of their countries," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said after a hastily scheduled meeting between Bush and Presidents Arnold F.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration has concluded that Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia probably will succeed in winning some form of independence from the Soviet Union and has decided that the best policy for the United States is simply to keep out of the way, officials said Thursday. "We think independence is coming" for the three Baltic states, one official said. "It may take some time, and there may be a transitional period first. But the whole direction of the process is toward independence."
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday that the march toward independence by Soviet republics has become "inexorable" but insisted that it is not yet time for the United States to join the rush toward formal recognition of the break-away Baltic states. The cautious stance reflects what Bush described as his concern that too "precipitous" a move by the United States could nudge a highly fluid Soviet Union further toward dissolution and disorder.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush told the presidents of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania on Tuesday that he will exert U.S. pressure on the fraying central government of the Soviet Union to remove thousands of Soviet troops from the newly independent Baltic republics. "All three presidents did ask (Bush) for his support . . . in getting Soviet troops out of their countries," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said after a hastily scheduled meeting between Bush and Presidents Arnold F.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III zipped through the three newly independent Baltic states on Saturday, promising their struggling governments that the United States will help remake their economies but bringing only minimal financial aid. Baker spent three hours each in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, presenting each country's president with one of the Baltic flags that hung in the State Department lobby during the half-century that the little republics were under Soviet rule.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced Wednesday that he will "move quickly" to establish normal economic relations with the newly independent Baltic states by offering them most-favored-nation trading status with the United States.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Estonia on Wednesday formally restored the diplomatic relations between the two countries that had been interrupted since 1940, when the Soviet army, occupying this tiny Baltic country, forced the American diplomats here to leave. "This is not a new country," Curtis Kamman, deputy assistant secretary of state, said after signing a document resuming relations.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday that the march toward independence by Soviet republics has become "inexorable" but insisted that it is not yet time for the United States to join the rush toward formal recognition of the break-away Baltic states. The cautious stance reflects what Bush described as his concern that too "precipitous" a move by the United States could nudge a highly fluid Soviet Union further toward dissolution and disorder.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, the United States has championed the cause of Baltic independence, steadfastly refusing to acknowledge the annexation of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania by the Soviet Union and granting their representatives the sort of diplomatic presence they were denied by much of the rest of the world.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fine print on official U.S. maps denies this is part of the Soviet Union, and when President Bush meets Mikhail S. Gorbachev next week, many in the Baltic republics--Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia--want him not to forget it. "The West has always regarded the U.S.S.R. as its greatest threat," Eugen Pyat, a member of the Estonian People's Front, said. "So why can't it destroy the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration announced Wednesday that it will begin sending relief supplies directly to the Baltics and the Ukraine, circumventing the Soviet central government in an apparent response to Moscow's violent crackdown on nationalist dissent. White House officials stressed that the assistance was not intended to undercut the efforts of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to reach a peaceful solution to the crisis posed by the secessionist movements.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Secretary of State James A. Baker III failed to break a logjam in arms control talks Friday and disagreed over whether the United States is free to use military force in Iraq. But they still expressed confidence that U.S.-Soviet relations are slowly improving after what Gorbachev called "an uneasy period."
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration announced Wednesday that it will begin sending relief supplies directly to the Baltics and the Ukraine, circumventing the Soviet central government in an apparent response to Moscow's violent crackdown on nationalist dissent. White House officials stressed that the assistance was not intended to undercut the efforts of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to reach a peaceful solution to the crisis posed by the secessionist movements.
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