Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Lebanon
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Lebanon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
Fearing damage to its relations with the United States, Israel has moved swiftly to blunt suggestions that its abduction of a Muslim sheik last week should be blamed for the reported hanging of Marine Lt. Col. William R. Higgins by his Islamic captors. And if signs Tuesday were any indication, the Israeli campaign of private lobbying and television interviews is working.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 7, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite last-minute objections from the Lebanese government, the United Nations appears ready to declare Israel's withdrawal from this nation complete, a key step in pacifying the last active Arab-Israeli war front. U.N. special envoy Terje Roed-Larsen said Tuesday that he expects both Lebanon and Israel will temporarily put aside objections over the way the border between them has been fixed and accept the U.N. ruling, which could be handed down by the Security Council as early as Thursday.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | United Press International
Two Lebanese-American members of Congress, Reps. Mary Rose Oakar (D-Ohio) and Nick J. Rahall II (D-W.Va.), flew to Lebanon on Friday to try to persuade warring factions to accept an Arab League peace plan. Clovis Maksoud, ambassador of the Arab League in the United States, said that Oaker and Rahall, as influential members of the Lebanese-American community, will meet with Maj. Gen.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright is "inclined" to lift a decade-old ban on travel by Americans to Lebanon, a senior State Department official said Tuesday, a step that would remove what the Beirut government considers a stain on its efforts to rebuild the country after a disastrous civil war. State Department officials responsible for Middle East policy have unanimously urged Albright to end restrictions on the use of U.S.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
There are usually no more than a handful--ragtag bands of former shoe clerks or bakery workers, anonymous students or manual laborers in Lebanon's orange groves. Often, they seem to have barely enough money to feed themselves and their families. But they have guns. And they have one more thing: American hostages. In the remorseless calculus of terrorism, that is all it takes to paralyze the power centers of the world.
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States urged Israel, Syria and Lebanon to exercise maximum restraint and end a dangerous escalation of tension in the Middle East. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher announced contacts with the three nations after Israeli warplanes blasted pro-Iranian Hezbollah guerrilla bases in southern Lebanon in a series of strikes, the third wave of Israeli attacks into Lebanon in less than a week.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr. and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A promise of freedom for an American hostage remained frozen Friday, although Syrian and U.S. officials involved in the drama expressed cautious optimism that heightened involvement by Iran in the crisis means that a release is still on track within the next few days. A ranking Bush Administration official said Tehran is involved "on an hour-by-hour basis" in an attempt to end the standoff over the U.S. refusal to dispatch Assistant Secretary of State John Kelly to Syria.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The new U.S. ambassador to Lebanon, Ryan Crocker, presented his credentials to President Elias Hrawi after reopening the U.S. Embassy, which was evacuated 15 months ago during fierce fighting. The decision to send in Crocker, 51, despite the still tenuous security situation reflects U.S. support for Hrawi's government, which is trying to end 15 years of civil war.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Unofficial American negotiators have had direct contacts with the captors of at least 16 Westerners believed held in Lebanon and are working on a deal to pay ransom for the hostages' releases, the leading Lebanese magazine As Shiraa said Friday. As Shiraa, which has good contacts among Islamic fundamentalists and is the magazine that first broke the Iran-Contra scandal story, said Anglican Church envoy Terry Waite may be the first hostage freed in the proposed deal. Waite, 50, was abducted Jan.
NEWS
July 11, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With clashes escalating in southern Lebanon between Israel and the Hezbollah militia, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin on Monday asked the United States to intervene and defuse tensions. Rabin made his request in a meeting with U.S. peace envoy Dennis Ross, who began a shuttle mission between Israel and Syria on Monday aimed at advancing their slow-moving peace negotiations.
NEWS
February 23, 1993 | MARILYN RASCHKA and DOYLE McMANUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Secretary of State Warren Christopher made a surprise, high-security visit to Lebanon's war-racked capital on Monday, making a symbolic show of American support for the divided country's independence and winning its government's support for his effort to resume Middle East peace talks. It was the first visit to Beirut by an American secretary of state in almost nine years.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN and MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
U.S. Rep. Christopher Cox hadn't even sat down when Lebanese President Elias Hrawi welcomed the Orange County Republican to their meeting last week with what has become a standard greeting for the rare American visitor to Beirut. "How did you get here?" the president asked. It was a relevant question. Cox was, after all, in the capital of a nation better known in America for its hostages than its hospitality, a land that remains officially off limits to U.S.
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States urged Israel, Syria and Lebanon to exercise maximum restraint and end a dangerous escalation of tension in the Middle East. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher announced contacts with the three nations after Israeli warplanes blasted pro-Iranian Hezbollah guerrilla bases in southern Lebanon in a series of strikes, the third wave of Israeli attacks into Lebanon in less than a week.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | ART PINE and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration demanded Wednesday that the remains of two Americans who died in captivity in Lebanon be returned and flatly denied promising Muslim terrorists that it would not attempt to punish them for the abduction or murder of American hostages. During a briefing at the White House, presidential Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater insisted that there were "no deals" and "no quid pro quos " in connection with the return of all American hostages from Lebanon.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release Monday of Terry Waite, the negotiator turned hostage, from 1,763 days of Lebanese captivity brings an end to Beirut's most notorious political kidnaping. Other hostages have been held longer--most notably Terry A. Anderson, chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press, who has been held captive for six years and eight months. But none was better known worldwide than Waite, the Archbishop of Canterbury's envoy who disappeared into Beirut's labyrinth on Jan.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Kidnapers who claim to hold two U.S. hostages Saturday blamed the United States in the massacre of seven Palestinian workers in Israel last week and vowed to make the United States and Israel "pay the price." However, the statement by the Organization of Islamic Jihad for the Liberation of Palestine did not directly threaten to harm the two hostages. The Arabic-language statement, delivered to a Western news agency in Beirut, came with an instant picture of U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A U.N. envoy visited Israel last week for talks on a possible hostage swap in the Middle East, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Saturday. He said that Giandomenico Picco, a personal representative of U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, had already left Israel. The spokesman declined to give further details. A Defense Ministry spokesman said Israel still has no news of its seven servicemen missing in Lebanon.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar and the White House still professed optimism Friday, but a mood of foreboding took hold as a full day went by without the release of a second hostage from the fundamentalist Islamic kidnapers in Lebanon.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|