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United States Foreign Relations Libya

NEWS
March 28, 1992 | Associated Press
The United States on Friday accused Libya of trying to subvert the United Nations by taking its defense of two suspected terrorists to the World Court. The aggressive U.S. stance came on the second day of a hearing in the international court on Western demands for the extradition of two Libyans accused of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 over Scotland in 1988.
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NEWS
March 28, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of investigation, the U.S. Treasury Department announced Friday that it is freezing the American assets of 46 businesses it says are ultimately controlled by the Libyan government. The 46 multinational firms include key concerns involved in international banking, investment, petroleum and commercial industries. While none of the firms are headquartered in the United States, many are located in countries that are close allies--notably Britain and France, co-sponsors of a pending U.N.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing the United States and Britain of "illegal and arbitrary blackmail," Libya asked the International Court of Justice on Thursday to protect it from sanctions for refusing to turn over two men suspected in the 1988 bombing of a Pan American Airways jet. Trying to head off passage of a U.N.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With events justifying its skepticism, the Bush Administration pressured the United Nations on Wednesday to impose sanctions on Libya after the government of Moammar Kadafi reneged on a pledge to turn over the two suspects in the Pan American Airways Flight 103 terrorist bombing. But diplomats were uncertain when the Security Council will take up the American-British-French resolution aimed at punishing Libya.
NEWS
March 25, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Arab League delegation, testing the sincerity of Libya's offer to turn over two men wanted in the bombing of Pan American Flight 103, flew to Tripoli on Tuesday while the U.S. government kept up its drumbeat of doubts. "History would suggest that we should be skeptical that this is indeed a good-faith offer," said Margaret Tutwiler, the State Department spokeswoman.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to avert United Nations sanctions, Libya made a hedged promise Monday to deliver the two suspects in the terrorist bombing of Pan American World Airways Flight 103 to officials of the Arab League. While the promise raised some suspicions and failed to satisfy the Bush Administration, it bolstered a campaign to delay consideration by the Security Council of a resolution imposing sanctions on Libya.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali reported an "evolution" on Wednesday in the Libyan position on the Pan Am Flight 103 air disaster, but the Bush Administration dismissed the latest overtures of Libya as nothing new.
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