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United States Foreign Relations Macedonia

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NEWS
May 3, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met Wednesday with Macedonian President Boris Trajkovski in a bid to prevent sporadic waves of ethnic unrest in the Balkan nation from erupting into war. The U.S. effort to support Trajkovski, a Methodist minister, is one of the strongest foreign policy initiatives yet taken by the Bush team. It also signals that the administration intends to remain an active player in the Balkans, despite calls during last year's U.S. election campaign for a diminished role.
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NEWS
May 3, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met Wednesday with Macedonian President Boris Trajkovski in a bid to prevent sporadic waves of ethnic unrest in the Balkan nation from erupting into war. The U.S. effort to support Trajkovski, a Methodist minister, is one of the strongest foreign policy initiatives yet taken by the Bush team. It also signals that the administration intends to remain an active player in the Balkans, despite calls during last year's U.S. election campaign for a diminished role.
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NEWS
March 26, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration's refusal to intervene in Macedonia's escalating crisis--through diplomatic mediation or a security role--increases the risk that a Balkan war will once again threaten stability in southeastern Europe, according to a growing chorus of influential U.S. and European analysts.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell dove into the Balkan quagmire Thursday, helping to launch a new initiative to ease ethnic tensions in Macedonia--and perhaps prevent a new war in the region. The mere involvement of the United States in this troubled former Yugoslav republic is a major shift, especially by an administration that has repeatedly resisted a high-profile role in the region and even eliminated the position of special envoy to the Balkans. Officials here said U.S.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 2 1/2 years of friction, Greece and Macedonia signed an agreement Wednesday settling all but one issue between them and removing a worrisome source of tension in the Balkans. Former Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance, the special U.N. envoy who mediated between the two, described the accord as one of "very broad scope and deep meaning" that could serve as a model for warring states in the region once the fighting dies down.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tens of thousands of Greeks demonstrated outside the U.S. Consulate in Salonika to protest Washington's recognition of the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia as an independent state. Greece has tried to keep its allies from establishing diplomatic ties with Macedonia, contending that its northern neighbor has designs on the northern Greek province of the same name.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | HOWARD LIBIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ljubica Z. Acevska says that when she agreed to become the Republic of Macedonia's representative to the United States, she was optimistic about her ability to turn herself into a successful diplomat. After all, she already had many years of experience as a partner in a trading-and-development company specializing in the Middle East and Eastern Europe. There's no real difference between international business and international relations, she told herself.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | Associated Press
The United States recognized the independence of the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia on Wednesday after more than two years of sidestepping the issue in deference to North Atlantic Treaty Organization ally Greece. A White House statement said that the people of Macedonia had chosen independence by democratic means and that recognition could help resolve differences with Athens.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell dove into the Balkan quagmire Thursday, helping to launch a new initiative to ease ethnic tensions in Macedonia--and perhaps prevent a new war in the region. The mere involvement of the United States in this troubled former Yugoslav republic is a major shift, especially by an administration that has repeatedly resisted a high-profile role in the region and even eliminated the position of special envoy to the Balkans. Officials here said U.S.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | From Associated Press
Angered by Western recognition of the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, Greece closed its consulate in the Macedonian capital and cut off the country's main trade route Wednesday. The Athens government claims that Macedonia has designs on Greece's northern province, also called Macedonia, and says these claims are reflected in Macedonia's name, flag and symbols, which Athens says are historically Greek.
NEWS
March 26, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration's refusal to intervene in Macedonia's escalating crisis--through diplomatic mediation or a security role--increases the risk that a Balkan war will once again threaten stability in southeastern Europe, according to a growing chorus of influential U.S. and European analysts.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 2 1/2 years of friction, Greece and Macedonia signed an agreement Wednesday settling all but one issue between them and removing a worrisome source of tension in the Balkans. Former Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance, the special U.N. envoy who mediated between the two, described the accord as one of "very broad scope and deep meaning" that could serve as a model for warring states in the region once the fighting dies down.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | From Associated Press
Angered by Western recognition of the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, Greece closed its consulate in the Macedonian capital and cut off the country's main trade route Wednesday. The Athens government claims that Macedonia has designs on Greece's northern province, also called Macedonia, and says these claims are reflected in Macedonia's name, flag and symbols, which Athens says are historically Greek.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tens of thousands of Greeks demonstrated outside the U.S. Consulate in Salonika to protest Washington's recognition of the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia as an independent state. Greece has tried to keep its allies from establishing diplomatic ties with Macedonia, contending that its northern neighbor has designs on the northern Greek province of the same name.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | Associated Press
The United States recognized the independence of the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia on Wednesday after more than two years of sidestepping the issue in deference to North Atlantic Treaty Organization ally Greece. A White House statement said that the people of Macedonia had chosen independence by democratic means and that recognition could help resolve differences with Athens.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | HOWARD LIBIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ljubica Z. Acevska says that when she agreed to become the Republic of Macedonia's representative to the United States, she was optimistic about her ability to turn herself into a successful diplomat. After all, she already had many years of experience as a partner in a trading-and-development company specializing in the Middle East and Eastern Europe. There's no real difference between international business and international relations, she told herself.
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