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United States Foreign Relations Mexico

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NEWS
September 9, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration on Thursday officially recognized Ernesto Zedillo as Mexico's next president, as Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen delivered a congratulatory letter to the "President-Elect of the United Mexican States" along with an invitation for Zedillo to visit the White House in the fall. Zedillo won the most votes in Mexico's hard-fought presidential election Aug. 21, but he will not be named president-elect until after the new Mexican Congress meets Nov. 1. to ratify the results.
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NEWS
September 30, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seven years of boom times, the twin-city border crossing known as the two Laredos had already begun hurting from this year's economic slowdown. Then came the Sept. 11 terror attacks, and suddenly this city and Laredo on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande are reeling. Truck traffic has flattened after a decade of double-digit growth.
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NEWS
May 23, 1999 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medications banned or highly restricted in the United States because of severe, and sometimes fatal, side effects are being smuggled in from Mexico and peddled out of back-room shops across Southern California. These potentially dangerous drugs, which multinational pharmaceutical companies market in Mexico, where regulations and enforcement are less stringent, have shown up consistently in more than 70 raids over the last year of markets, dress shops and swap meets catering to Latino immigrants.
NEWS
September 1, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House acknowledged Friday that the drive by President Bush and Mexican President Vicente Fox to help illegal immigrant workers in the United States acquire legal status has made little progress and will not be ready when the two leaders meet here next week. Thus only a "series of principles" and a "framework" on immigration reform will be issued during Fox's visit, White House Press Secretary Ari Fleischer said. "The issue of immigration is . . . very complicated," he said.
NEWS
July 14, 1988
Mexico announced that it will extradite a West German woman charged in the United States with smuggling 6.6 tons of cocaine in the early 1980s. A Foreign Ministry spokesman said Veronica Kiera-Wahl, who has been jailed in the southern Mexican state of Yucatan since last year, will be handed over to U.S. authorities in the next few days. Kiera-Wahl had allegedly smuggled cocaine from Colombia for six months until September, 1982.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | Reuters
U.S. and Mexican authorities Friday announced the seizure of $4 million in property and the freezing of more than $10 million in Mexican bank accounts as part of a joint effort to break up a large cross-border drug conspiracy. U.S. Atty. Alan Bersin said four people were indicted on suspicion of organizing the drug smuggling operation between Mexicali, Mexico, and Calexico, Calif., and of laundering proceeds by buying property in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first day of trial of four men charged in the murder of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena, a federal judge in Los Angeles told prospective jurors that it would be "one of the most interesting cases on which you will have the opportunity to serve." U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie's statement was no exaggeration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1993 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine months have passed since Salvatore Russo and his fishing crew got caught in a hurricane so ferocious that when they radioed for help, the U.S. Coast Guard told them that only God could save them. The miracle materialized, but now Russo could use another.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest in a series of embarrassments in Mexico's struggle to battle its powerful narcotics cartels, two federal agents were under arrest Saturday after the brother of convicted drug kingpin Juan Garcia Abrego "inexplicably" walked out of a federal police lockup.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
The Mexican government formally demanded Monday that the United States cancel plans to build a highly controversial 4-mile-long ditch on the border between San Diego and Tijuana aimed at reducing the smuggling of immigrants into the United States by vehicle. "In the spirit of cooperation and friendship that characterizes the relation between the two nations, that option (the ditch) must be discarded," the Mexican Foreign Ministry said in a communique late Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Union activists and others advocating amnesty for illegal immigrants gathered outside a Los Angeles supermarket Thursday as part of a swelling public relations campaign aimed at influencing upcoming immigration talks between President Bush and Mexican President Vicente Fox. Participants, armed with a new study from UCLA lauding the economic benefits of illegal-immigrant labor, called on the Bush administration to back the sweeping amnesty that Fox is seeking.
NEWS
August 18, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-Mexican effort to overhaul immigration policy is now focusing on ways to allow large numbers of temporary guest workers into the United States to meet the demands of restaurants, hotels, health care and other service industries that are starved for employees, according to U.S. government officials and observers familiar with the talks. Under the proposed approach, a broader array of U.S.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the U.S.-Mexico talks on immigration, it is the unspoken word, a term so sensitive that officials on both sides of the bargaining table avoid using it in public. The word is "amnesty." Today, as Cabinet officials of the United States and Mexico meet to discuss an array of immigration issues, their agenda includes border safety, a new guest worker program and other strategies to impose order on the chaotic human flow across America's southern boundary.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born of the controversy over free trade, it was an unusual bilateral creation: a public bank, run jointly by the United States and Mexico, to finance desperately needed antipollution measures along the shared border. But the North American Development Bank has spent the last six years in obscurity, largely ignored by the governments that spawned it and unable to lend impoverished border towns more than a pittance from its bulging vault.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial new study by a Washington group favoring reduced levels of immigration draws a grim picture of the economic and social consequences of large-scale immigration to the United States from Mexico--especially in California. The continuing influx of poor settlers from Mexico provides marginal economic benefits while burdening public services and schools and creating generations of poverty, according to the report, released Thursday.
NEWS
June 23, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH and KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mexican and American officials unveiled a sweeping program Friday to improve safety for people crossing illegally into the United States, taking the first concrete step toward an overall accord ensuring orderly and safe migration. The border safety pact, announced in Mexico City and Washington, calls for a U.S. review of the controversial tight-border policy that has steered Mexicans into dangerous and remote crossings.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
A unique collaborative study by Mexican health officials and U.S. Navy personnel has found that none of the 357 Tijuana prostitutes tested were infected with the AIDS virus, the Navy said last week. The results, coupled with similar findings from a separate study of prostitutes and other Mexican citizens at high risk for AIDS, would indicate that infection is not prevalent among prostitutes in the border city--a longtime destination for U.S. thrill-seekers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | YVETTE C. DOSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A small boy, a young cadet in the Mexican army, is said to have wrapped himself in the Mexican flag as he leaped to his death from the top of Chapultepec Castle in Mexico City during the last stand of the U.S.-Mexican war in 1847. He, along with five other young "nin~os heroes"--or "child heroes," as they are now known in Mexico--flung themselves off the castle during the battle, joining the tens of thousands of Mexican soldiers who died fighting U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of trying, federal authorities Monday had Everardo Arturo Paez Martinez where they wanted him: in a courtroom on U.S. soil. Paez, a Mexican citizen suspected of having been a top aide in Tijuana's Arellano Felix drug cartel, was arraigned in U.S. District Court after being extradited by Mexico in a move hailed as historic. It was the first time Mexico had agreed to hand over a major Mexican drug suspect, U.S. officials said.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush met Thursday with his Mexican counterpart, Vicente Fox, to discuss temporary visas for Mexican workers and plans for long-range energy development among Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. The meeting was the third for the pair, who talked at the Summit of the Americas in Canada last month and met in Mexico in February. Fox said they discussed long-range plans for the U.S. to import energy from Mexico and Canada, which have large reserves of oil and natural gas.
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