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United States Foreign Relations Mexico

NEWS
May 24, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican government on Wednesday requested the extradition of a Guadalajara doctor who was abducted last month and spirited to the United States to stand trial in the 1985 torture-murder of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena. In a bulletin issued by the Foreign Ministry, the government said it was asking for the return of Dr.
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NEWS
September 3, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They face constraints that limit prospects for immediate results, but President Bush and Mexican President Vicente Fox appear determined this week to begin remaking the U.S.-Mexican relationship in ways that could have powerful repercussions for both countries in coming years.
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | FREDRIC N. TULSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years after a U.S. drug agent was kidnapped, tortured and murdered in Mexico, evidence has emerged that federal prosecutors relied on perjured testimony and false information, casting a cloud over the convictions of three men now serving life sentences. The evidence suggests that the U.S. government, in its zeal to solve the heinous killing of Enrique Camarena, induced corrupt former Mexican police to implicate top officials there in a conspiracy to plan his kidnapping.
NEWS
May 29, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Anzalduas Canal should be brimming with water this spring, irrigating thousands of acres of rich Mexican farmland south of the Rio Grande along the Texas border. Instead, one of the largest canals in Latin America holds only a foot or two of stagnant water, choked with reeds and old tires. The pathetic conduit is one sign of a water shortage so severe that for the first time in recorded history, the Rio Grande stopped flowing into the Gulf of Mexico in February.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his arrest quickly becoming a binational political issue, a Marine Corps sergeant has been freed from a Mexican jail two weeks after being seized for inadvertently entering Mexico while on duty with guns in his car. Sgt. Brian Johnston, 23, a driver in a transportation unit at Camp Pendleton, was released near midnight Friday after a judge in Tijuana dropped a weapons charge against him.
NEWS
June 5, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno declared Friday that she has "every confidence" in Mexico's top prosecutor, as she and other U.S. officials sought to quell a controversy over alleged drug corruption that cast a shadow over a high-level meeting here. The annual talks between members of the two country's Cabinets occurred just days after U.S.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With headlines trumpeting an "energy war," the Mexican government Thursday retaliated against charges by some U.S. oil companies that Mexico "dumped" low-cost crude onto the American market. Mexico halted the scheduled lifting of a 4% tariff on imported natural gas, dashing hopes of California and other U.S. gas producers for newly profitable markets south of the border. The tit-for-tat was triggered by an anti-dumping complaint by several small U.S.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a victory for Mexico and the U.S. owners of its thousands of maquiladora factories, Mexico and the United States on Friday announced a deal boosting Mexico's tax revenue from the factories by 50% and cutting Uncle Sam's share by the same amount. The agreement heads off, for at least three years, the threat that the firms would face double taxation--a prospect that could have cooled the industry's rapid growth in Mexico and diverted new factories to other Latin American nations.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of the thorniest issues in U.S.-Mexico relations--immigration and drugs--took center stage in surprising new forms Friday as governors from states along both sides of the border wound up their yearly get-together. Arizona Gov. Jane Dee Hull won the support of her counterparts in Texas and New Mexico for a proposal to create a guest worker program that would enable more immigrants to work legally in the United States on a temporary basis. California Gov.
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