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NEWS
March 8, 1988 | Associated Press
Following is the text of the Friday letter from Secretary of State George P. Shultz to Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, as published in photocopy form Sunday by the Israeli newspaper Yediot Aharonot: I set forth below the understanding which I am convinced is necessary to achieve the prompt opening of negotiations on a comprehensive peace. This statement of understandings emerges from discussions held with you and other regional leaders.
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NEWS
April 1, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush is under growing pressure to do something--almost anything--to defuse the intense hostilities between Israel and the Palestinians, which flared anew Sunday with two more suicide bombings and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's solemn pronouncement that his country is in "a war over our home." Unlike the many world leaders who weighed in on the mounting crisis, Bush was silent Sunday.
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NEWS
June 6, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir on Sunday refused to budge in his opposition to key elements of Secretary of State George P. Shultz's peace initiative, but Shultz vowed to continue his shuttle diplomacy even if his only remaining hope is to leave a "constructive and positive" Middle East picture for the next Administration.
NEWS
March 26, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Calling on allies in Europe and the Arab world to help, the United States on Monday engaged in intense diplomacy with Israel and the Palestinians in a bid to reduce bloodshed and generate momentum for a peace proposal to be debated this week at an Arab League summit. The Bush administration quietly tried to win Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's approval for Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat to attend the summit in Beirut, which begins Wednesday.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Key details began to emerge Monday of the separate, and in some ways competing, American and French plans for a cease-fire between Israel and Hezbollah--and they help explain why it is taking so long to stop the fighting. The French plan goes much further toward accommodating the interests of Hezbollah, the Iranian-backed militia operating in southern Lebanon, than does the American plan.
NEWS
March 21, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's White House staff, rekindling the rancor of the 1980 election campaign, denounced former President Jimmy Carter on Friday for criticizing Administration policy in a speech in Cairo. "We are deeply disappointed by his comments," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said. "If he wants to be helpful in the area of foreign affairs, he might want to forgo criticism of U.S. leaders while he's on foreign soil."
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir declared "war" on the latest U.S. Middle East peace plan Wednesday as Palestinian unrest on the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip entered its fourth month with three more Arabs reported killed by army gunfire. Speaking at a meeting of the parliamentary faction of his rightist Likud Bloc five days after the American initiative was formally presented here by Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moments after their final meeting with Secretary of State James A. Baker III, when the Palestinians at last pledged to go to talks in Madrid with Israel over the fate of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, negotiator Hanan Ashrawi murmured to a reporter, "What else could we do? We had no choice."
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz met separately Monday with the leaders of Israel's divided coalition government, inviting them to help him "put flesh on the bones" of his Middle East peace initiative. A senior State Department official said Shultz told the Israelis that their doubts about certain aspects of the proposal could be resolved when the remaining details are filled in.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria's foreign minister, a scowl of indignation on his face Friday, held up a picture of a 32-year-old Yitzhak Shamir. "He kills peace mediators," charged the minister, Farouk Shareh, summoning up a lifetime of vitriol. Shareh's performance was the climax of a morning of intense hostility between the Syrian and Israeli representatives to the Madrid peace talks.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | TRACY WILKINSON and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. efforts to broker a Mideast cease-fire ahead of a key Arab summit suffered multiple blows Sunday as the latest round of negotiations failed to produce an agreement to halt 18 months of bloodshed. Vice President Dick Cheney said he has no plans to return to the region for talks with Yasser Arafat, and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon threatened to prevent the Palestinian Authority president from traveling to the Arab League summit in Beirut this week.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. envoy Anthony C. Zinni held a second day of separate meetings with Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat on Saturday amid quickening efforts to broker a cease-fire. Israel said that Sharon was willing to meet with top Palestinian officials to declare a cease-fire in the deadliest fighting between the two sides in decades.
NEWS
November 27, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Israelis and Palestinians were skeptical Monday that retired Marine Gen. Anthony C. Zinni, the latest U.S. envoy to wade into the Mideast conflict, will succeed in halting 14 months of bloodshed. Zinni arrived to find Israel on a high security alert and violence surging in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The militant Islamic organization Hamas is threatening to avenge Israel's killing of its military chief in the West Bank.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell revived the dormant U.S. mediator role in the Middle East on Monday and warned Israelis and Palestinians to get ready to give up some cherished objectives. In the Bush administration's most detailed analysis of its hopes for peace in the region, Powell did not outline a new U.S. peace proposal, as some aides had hinted he might. But he did name a new emissary, retired Marine Gen. Anthony C.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Although nobody is talking about U.S. oil interests in the war on terrorism, beneath the surface serious questions are bubbling about long-term supplies of petroleum and the shape of governments in the oil-rich Middle East. Once the war is over--"once Afghanistan is stabilized," in one oilman's words--a new order may emerge. The oil-bearing countries' relationship with the United States and other regions will change. There will be a power shift among oil producers.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For separate but equally ominous reasons, the United States has concluded that neither Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat nor Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is likely to conclude a final peace agreement, according to a wide range of senior U.S. officials. As a result, Washington has lowered its expectations of what can be achieved if both sides reach the negotiating table. For the foreseeable future, U.S.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Tuesday described Yasser Arafat, the Palestine Liberation Organization chairman, as "the indispensable figure" in the Middle East peace process, but the Clinton Administration ruled out pressing Israel to meet Arafat's conditions for resuming negotiations.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright heads to the Middle East this week for meetings that could set the tone for U.S. involvement in the troubled region for the rest of the Clinton administration, and possibly years longer. Israel and the Palestinians--negotiating without direct U.S. involvement for the first time in almost four years--are closing in on an interim peace agreement that probably will be signed shortly after Albright arrives.
NEWS
June 18, 2001 | From Reuters
Israeli troops fatally shot a 12-year-old Palestinian boy in the Gaza Strip on Sunday, four days after bilateral agreement was reached on a U.S.-brokered cease-fire. Palestinian hospital officials said Ali Abu Shaweesh was killed in Khan Yunis, near the Jewish settlement of Neve Dekalim, where stone-throwing clashes took place throughout the day. Three other people were wounded, they said.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pitfalls in Yasser Arafat's vow of a cease-fire were in full view at the funeral Sunday of the Abu Obeid brothers. Heavily armed gunmen attending the rites here said they had not been told to stop shooting. Mourners chanted that the blood of martyrs will not be wasted. And one of Arafat's key lieutenants similarly scoffed at the idea of a cease-fire.
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