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United States Foreign Relations Mongolia

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NEWS
July 27, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why Mongolia? What is it about this remote, lightly populated Central Asian land that tugs at the heart of the usually unsentimental Secretary of State James A. Baker III? Over the last 2 1/2 years, while often proclaiming the importance of American interests across the Pacific, the secretary of state has shown little, if any, eagerness for travel in Asia. He has, so far, made at least 25 visits to Europe since taking office, and only four to Asia (excluding the Middle East).
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NEWS
May 3, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the surface, Mongolia seems like merely a pleasant, inconsequential little diversion for U.S. foreign policy. Appearances are deceiving: The United States cares about this remote, scenic country in more ways than it lets on. When Secretary of State Madeleine Albright touched down here Saturday to pursue Washington's avid 1990s courtship of Mongolia, there were happy photo opportunities galore.
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NEWS
January 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush accorded Mongolia most-favored-nation trade status and saluted the democratic and economic reforms unfolding in the once-Communist state. Mongolian President Punsalmaagiyn Ochirbat, the first Mongolian head of state ever to visit the United States, said the new trade arrangement will foster U.S. investment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
In the five years since the fall of communism in Mongolia, steady progress has been made toward adopting civilian and military justice systems based on democratic principles, said a law clerk who recently returned from the Asian nation. Beth Lin, a law clerk in Woodland Hills for U.S.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The State Department said last week that the United States is moving toward an agreement to establish diplomatic relations with Mongolia, an Asian ally of the Soviet Union and one of the most secretive countries in the world. "We are having discussions with Mongolia about normalizing relations," State Department spokesman Charles Redman said Friday. "We are hopeful these discussions will end with the establishment of relations between our two countries in the near future."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
In the five years since the fall of communism in Mongolia, steady progress has been made toward adopting civilian and military justice systems based on democratic principles, said a law clerk who recently returned from the Asian nation. Beth Lin, a law clerk in Woodland Hills for U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the surface, Mongolia seems like merely a pleasant, inconsequential little diversion for U.S. foreign policy. Appearances are deceiving: The United States cares about this remote, scenic country in more ways than it lets on. When Secretary of State Madeleine Albright touched down here Saturday to pursue Washington's avid 1990s courtship of Mongolia, there were happy photo opportunities galore.
NEWS
July 27, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why Mongolia? What is it about this remote, lightly populated Central Asian land that tugs at the heart of the usually unsentimental Secretary of State James A. Baker III? Over the last 2 1/2 years, while often proclaiming the importance of American interests across the Pacific, the secretary of state has shown little, if any, eagerness for travel in Asia. He has, so far, made at least 25 visits to Europe since taking office, and only four to Asia (excluding the Middle East).
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush accorded Mongolia most-favored-nation trade status and saluted the democratic and economic reforms unfolding in the once-Communist state. Mongolian President Punsalmaagiyn Ochirbat, the first Mongolian head of state ever to visit the United States, said the new trade arrangement will foster U.S. investment.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The State Department said last week that the United States is moving toward an agreement to establish diplomatic relations with Mongolia, an Asian ally of the Soviet Union and one of the most secretive countries in the world. "We are having discussions with Mongolia about normalizing relations," State Department spokesman Charles Redman said Friday. "We are hopeful these discussions will end with the establishment of relations between our two countries in the near future."
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