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United States Foreign Relations Mozambique

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NEWS
July 24, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The elderly were gunned down by the score, hospital patients were shot dead in their beds and babies were killed as they nursed at their mothers' breasts. More than 380 people, mostly women and children, died in the massacre at Homoine, one of the worst in Mozambique's decade-long civil war, and the death toll continues to rise as more bodies are found, as more of the critically wounded die.
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NEWS
October 8, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Agency for International Development has spent $55 million since 1984 to buy trucks made in Japan and Germany, tractors made in Brazil and other foreign-produced goods to help establish private firms in Mozambique, Sen. David L. Boren (D-Okla.) disclosed Wednesday. Only 19% of American assistance to the African nation in the last eight years ultimately was used to buy U.S.
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NEWS
February 8, 1989
South African Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha called for a U.S.-brokered, international effort to end the 12-year civil war between right-wing guerrillas and the Marxist government of Mozambique. At a news briefing with foreign reporters in Cape Town, Botha said he raised the possibility of U.S. mediation in December in a meeting with then-Secretary of State George P. Shultz. Botha said he asked Shultz to convey the message to his successor, James A.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | Reuters
Mozambique's guerrilla war will top the agenda when President Joaquim Chissano meets President Bush in Washington next Tuesday. "A review of the process toward achieving peace in Mozambique will be at the top of our list," Melissa Wells, the U.S. ambassador in Maputo, said. The visit, Chissano's first to the Bush White House, comes at a crucial time for the African nation. In addition to the 14-year-old civil war, Chissano faces a wave of strikes by workers dissatisfied with a U.S.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Agency for International Development has spent $55 million since 1984 to buy trucks made in Japan and Germany, tractors made in Brazil and other foreign-produced goods to help establish private firms in Mozambique, Sen. David L. Boren (D-Okla.) disclosed Wednesday. Only 19% of American assistance to the African nation in the last eight years ultimately was used to buy U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1988 | United Press International
An ecumenical delegation of top Mozambican church leaders ended a Washington visit this week with praise for past American generosity and a plea for continued relief aid and political support for the embattled government. "The visit has been a good one," said Anglican Bishop Denis Salamao Sengulane in an interview. "I have found what we knew from a distance about American generosity is true."
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | DON SHANNON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration's decision to support the Marxist government of Mozambique as the best way to modify the regime has created a bitter policy dispute, pitting two powerful Republican senators against the Administration and the Democratic majority in the Senate. Secretary of State George P. Shultz traveled to Capitol Hill on Tuesday for a meeting with Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (Kan.) and Jesse Helms (N.C.), but he failed to resolve the conflict.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | Reuters
Mozambique's guerrilla war will top the agenda when President Joaquim Chissano meets President Bush in Washington next Tuesday. "A review of the process toward achieving peace in Mozambique will be at the top of our list," Melissa Wells, the U.S. ambassador in Maputo, said. The visit, Chissano's first to the Bush White House, comes at a crucial time for the African nation. In addition to the 14-year-old civil war, Chissano faces a wave of strikes by workers dissatisfied with a U.S.
NEWS
February 8, 1989
South African Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha called for a U.S.-brokered, international effort to end the 12-year civil war between right-wing guerrillas and the Marxist government of Mozambique. At a news briefing with foreign reporters in Cape Town, Botha said he raised the possibility of U.S. mediation in December in a meeting with then-Secretary of State George P. Shultz. Botha said he asked Shultz to convey the message to his successor, James A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1988 | United Press International
An ecumenical delegation of top Mozambican church leaders ended a Washington visit this week with praise for past American generosity and a plea for continued relief aid and political support for the embattled government. "The visit has been a good one," said Anglican Bishop Denis Salamao Sengulane in an interview. "I have found what we knew from a distance about American generosity is true."
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The elderly were gunned down by the score, hospital patients were shot dead in their beds and babies were killed as they nursed at their mothers' breasts. More than 380 people, mostly women and children, died in the massacre at Homoine, one of the worst in Mozambique's decade-long civil war, and the death toll continues to rise as more bodies are found, as more of the critically wounded die.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | DON SHANNON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration's decision to support the Marxist government of Mozambique as the best way to modify the regime has created a bitter policy dispute, pitting two powerful Republican senators against the Administration and the Democratic majority in the Senate. Secretary of State George P. Shultz traveled to Capitol Hill on Tuesday for a meeting with Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (Kan.) and Jesse Helms (N.C.), but he failed to resolve the conflict.
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