Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Myanmar
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Myanmar

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 10, 1996 | From Reuters
Myanmar will not extradite reputed Golden Triangle opium warlord Khun Sa to the United States, where he is wanted on heroin trafficking charges, Foreign Minister Ohn Gyaw said Friday. Ohn Gyaw's comments marked the first time that a senior Burmese official has publicly said Yangon had no plan to extradite Khun Sa, who surrendered to government forces last month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
It's been a typical week in Myanmar. The military junta that has ruled the country for more than a decade busied itself rounding up dissidents. On Monday, it accused Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi of "mental atrophy." Myanmar is an uncomputerized country that is nonetheless more spooked by numbers than America is by the millennium bug. At the moment, the junta is particularly scared that there might be an outbreak of popular unrest next week on the "four nines": Sept. 9, or 9/9/99.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 21, 1997 | Evelyn Iritani
The European Commission has filed a request with the World Trade Organization for a formal consultation with the United States to discuss concerns that a Massachusetts law designed to penalize companies doing business in Myanmar violates the global trade treaty. The EC's move is the first step in the dispute resolution process of the WTO, which is based in Geneva. If the two sides fail to resolve the dispute in 60 days, the Europeans can ask the WTO to appoint a panel to investigate their claim.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | Evelyn Iritani
The Massachusetts attorney general's office said that it will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review a federal appeals court ruling that declared unconstitutional a state law banning agencies from doing business with companies involved in Myanmar, the military-ruled country formerly known as Burma. Democratic Rep.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | From Reuters
A senior U.S. official accused the government of Myanmar on Monday of allowing drug lords in the Golden Triangle to flood the West with record quantities of heroin. "Evidence indicates that the government (of Myanmar, formerly Burma) has a sort of collusive relationship with some of the traffickers and is allowing them in some kind of bargained way to go ahead unfettered," Assistant Secretary of State Melvyn Levitsky told a news conference.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
It's been a typical week in Myanmar. The military junta that has ruled the country for more than a decade busied itself rounding up dissidents. On Monday, it accused Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi of "mental atrophy." Myanmar is an uncomputerized country that is nonetheless more spooked by numbers than America is by the millennium bug. At the moment, the junta is particularly scared that there might be an outbreak of popular unrest next week on the "four nines": Sept. 9, or 9/9/99.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived Tuesday for a meeting of Southeast Asian nations at which Japan is emphasizing more than ever before its differences with the United States, both on human rights questions and on defense policy. At the annual conference of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, Japan seized the initiative by proposing an enhanced security role for ASEAN--a suggestion that met with a cool response from the United States.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Myanmar's military government turned down a request by Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) to observe next week's parliamentary elections, saying he had made malicious attacks on the authorities and encouraged unrest. Solarz had asked to be allowed to visit polling booths and to meet Aung San Suu Kyi, leader of the opposition National League for Democracy. She has been under house arrest since last July and is banned from taking part in the May 27 election.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under mounting pressure from Congress and human rights advocates, President Clinton has decided to ban new U.S. investment in the troubled Southeast Asian nation of Myanmar, several White House officials confirmed Monday night. "It just reached the point where it was time to send a message," one Clinton administration official said, adding that previous sanctions did not appear to have an impact on "continuing repression" by the strong-willed generals who seized control of the country in 1988.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | Evelyn Iritani
The Massachusetts attorney general's office said that it will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review a federal appeals court ruling that declared unconstitutional a state law banning agencies from doing business with companies involved in Myanmar, the military-ruled country formerly known as Burma. Democratic Rep.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A powerful bloc of countries from four continents Tuesday confronted Myanmar's foreign minister here and warned him that they expect a speedy resolution in the standoff between security police and Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and the foreign ministers from Japan, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the European Union also informed Foreign Minister Ohn Gyaw that they intend to dispatch the top U.S.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1997 | Evelyn Iritani
The European Commission has filed a request with the World Trade Organization for a formal consultation with the United States to discuss concerns that a Massachusetts law designed to penalize companies doing business in Myanmar violates the global trade treaty. The EC's move is the first step in the dispute resolution process of the WTO, which is based in Geneva. If the two sides fail to resolve the dispute in 60 days, the Europeans can ask the WTO to appoint a panel to investigate their claim.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp. President John Imle strolled into the lion's den Friday when he held a surprise meeting in Myanmar with Nobel laureate and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, the most formidable critic of his firm's controversial $1.2-billion pipeline in that Asian nation. Imle's surprise move--praised by opponents of Myanmar's brutal military regime--represents a dramatic turnaround for the El Segundo-based energy company.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under mounting pressure from Congress and human rights advocates, President Clinton has decided to ban new U.S. investment in the troubled Southeast Asian nation of Myanmar, several White House officials confirmed Monday night. "It just reached the point where it was time to send a message," one Clinton administration official said, adding that previous sanctions did not appear to have an impact on "continuing repression" by the strong-willed generals who seized control of the country in 1988.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp.'s campaign to keep the Clinton administration from imposing tougher economic sanctions on the heavy-handed military regime running Myanmar has a powerful supporter in Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the coauthor of a Myanmar sanctions law signed last year. Feinstein, in a rare public statement on the issue, said Tuesday that reports of escalating violence and an alleged death threat against Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi are not enough to trigger a ban on new U.S.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motorola Inc., Swedish giant LM Ericsson and Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries share one thing that has put them on a collision course with a tough new law passed by the city of San Francisco. They're accused of doing business in a troubled Southeast Asian nation called Myanmar, which could jeopardize their bids for a $40-million emergency radio communications system and a $140-million light rail system for San Francisco International Airport.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A powerful bloc of countries from four continents Tuesday confronted Myanmar's foreign minister here and warned him that they expect a speedy resolution in the standoff between security police and Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and the foreign ministers from Japan, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the European Union also informed Foreign Minister Ohn Gyaw that they intend to dispatch the top U.S.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp.'s campaign to keep the Clinton administration from imposing tougher economic sanctions on the heavy-handed military regime running Myanmar has a powerful supporter in Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the coauthor of a Myanmar sanctions law signed last year. Feinstein, in a rare public statement on the issue, said Tuesday that reports of escalating violence and an alleged death threat against Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi are not enough to trigger a ban on new U.S.
NEWS
February 10, 1996 | From Reuters
Myanmar will not extradite reputed Golden Triangle opium warlord Khun Sa to the United States, where he is wanted on heroin trafficking charges, Foreign Minister Ohn Gyaw said Friday. Ohn Gyaw's comments marked the first time that a senior Burmese official has publicly said Yangon had no plan to extradite Khun Sa, who surrendered to government forces last month.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach) said Wednesday that he will use evidence of officially sanctioned drug dealing to try to derail efforts to normalize diplomatic relations between the United States and the military regime in Myanmar. Rather than improving relations with the military rulers of Myanmar, the Southeast Asian nation formerly known as Burma, Rohrabacher said the U.S. government should "relegate them to gangster status."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|