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NEWS
November 2, 1988
South Africa has reportedly agreed to the gist of a U.S. proposal to grant independence to South-West Africa--also known as Namibia--within a year and let Cuban troops remain in neighboring Angola for up to two years, two leading South African newspapers reported. Under this plan, South African forces would withdraw from Namibia and U.S.-sponsored elections would take place, the Citizen, a pro-government newspaper, and Business Day, the country's leading financial daily, said.
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NEWS
January 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African Foreign Minister Pik Botha met in Cape Town with U.S. and Soviet envoys to discuss a regional peace agreement centered on Namibia. Namibia became independent last year as part of an agreement brokered by the United States for the withdrawal of 50,000 Cuban troops from Angola, Namibia's northern neighbor. Herman Cohen, U.S. assistant secretary of state for African affairs, told reporters he was confident Cuban withdrawal from Namibia would be completed on schedule in June.
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NEWS
December 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
When Chester A. Crocker began the delicate task of selling his peace plan for southwestern Africa nearly eight years ago, he remembers plenty of resistance in African capitals. "There was a lot of broken furniture in the room during the first 18 months," said the 46-year-old assistant secretary of state. The notion of linking a Cuban troop withdrawal from Angola with independence for Angola's South African-controlled neighbor, Namibia, wasn't all that popular with any of the principal players.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Namibian President Sam Nujoma, describing his three-month-old republic as one of the world's poorest nations, appealed to President Bush on Tuesday for increased American aid and invited U.S. private investment in agriculture, health and housing projects. Dismissing World Bank figures that depict Namibia's per capita income as among the highest in sub-Saharan Africa, Nujoma said: "We are truly one of the poorest people on this Earth, truly among the least developed in the world."
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, claiming that Namibian independence is "a product of American diplomacy," arrived here Monday for ceremonies marking the birth of a new nation and the end of colonial rule in Africa. Talking to reporters aboard his Air Force transport on the 19-hour flight from Washington, Baker conceded that American support for Namibian independence was greater in the years before it was won than it will be in the immediate future.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Cuba, Angola and South Africa signed a historic agreement in this equatorial African capital Tuesday, committing themselves to a 27-month withdrawal of the approximately 50,000 Cuban troops in Angola and free elections next year in Namibia, the vast territory that South Africa has ruled for 73 years.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Negotiations on the future of Angola and Namibia will resume Friday in Geneva at a meeting that U.S. officials expect to produce a long-sought agreement for the withdrawal of all Cuban troops from Africa, the State Department announced Monday. The Reagan Administration's chief expert on Africa, Assistant Secretary of State Chester A. Crocker, will mediate in the talks between South Africa and a joint Cuba-Angola delegation, the department said.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African Foreign Minister Pik Botha met in Cape Town with U.S. and Soviet envoys to discuss a regional peace agreement centered on Namibia. Namibia became independent last year as part of an agreement brokered by the United States for the withdrawal of 50,000 Cuban troops from Angola, Namibia's northern neighbor. Herman Cohen, U.S. assistant secretary of state for African affairs, told reporters he was confident Cuban withdrawal from Namibia would be completed on schedule in June.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | Reuters
Tens of thousands of Namibians took to the streets Wednesday in a riot of pomp, color and pageantry to celebrate their nation's independence. The world's newest nation, which became the 160th member of the United Nations, launched a massive street party to mark the end of colonial domination, first by imperial Germany and since 1915 by neighboring South Africa. President Sam Nujoma and his Cabinet were installed by U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Reuters
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will meet South African President Frederik W. de Klerk next week in Cape Town and black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela in Namibia, the State Department said Friday. Spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler announced the schedule of Baker's trip to take part Wednesday in marking Namibia's independence from South Africa. Baker is to spend only about five hours in Cape Town. He will also meet Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu and other black leaders.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | Reuters
Tens of thousands of Namibians took to the streets Wednesday in a riot of pomp, color and pageantry to celebrate their nation's independence. The world's newest nation, which became the 160th member of the United Nations, launched a massive street party to mark the end of colonial domination, first by imperial Germany and since 1915 by neighboring South Africa. President Sam Nujoma and his Cabinet were installed by U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, claiming that Namibian independence is "a product of American diplomacy," arrived here Monday for ceremonies marking the birth of a new nation and the end of colonial rule in Africa. Talking to reporters aboard his Air Force transport on the 19-hour flight from Washington, Baker conceded that American support for Namibian independence was greater in the years before it was won than it will be in the immediate future.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Reuters
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will meet South African President Frederik W. de Klerk next week in Cape Town and black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela in Namibia, the State Department said Friday. Spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler announced the schedule of Baker's trip to take part Wednesday in marking Namibia's independence from South Africa. Baker is to spend only about five hours in Cape Town. He will also meet Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu and other black leaders.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
When Chester A. Crocker began the delicate task of selling his peace plan for southwestern Africa nearly eight years ago, he remembers plenty of resistance in African capitals. "There was a lot of broken furniture in the room during the first 18 months," said the 46-year-old assistant secretary of state. The notion of linking a Cuban troop withdrawal from Angola with independence for Angola's South African-controlled neighbor, Namibia, wasn't all that popular with any of the principal players.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Cuba, Angola and South Africa signed a historic agreement in this equatorial African capital Tuesday, committing themselves to a 27-month withdrawal of the approximately 50,000 Cuban troops in Angola and free elections next year in Namibia, the vast territory that South Africa has ruled for 73 years.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Negotiations on the future of Angola and Namibia will resume Friday in Geneva at a meeting that U.S. officials expect to produce a long-sought agreement for the withdrawal of all Cuban troops from Africa, the State Department announced Monday. The Reagan Administration's chief expert on Africa, Assistant Secretary of State Chester A. Crocker, will mediate in the talks between South Africa and a joint Cuba-Angola delegation, the department said.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Namibian President Sam Nujoma, describing his three-month-old republic as one of the world's poorest nations, appealed to President Bush on Tuesday for increased American aid and invited U.S. private investment in agriculture, health and housing projects. Dismissing World Bank figures that depict Namibia's per capita income as among the highest in sub-Saharan Africa, Nujoma said: "We are truly one of the poorest people on this Earth, truly among the least developed in the world."
NEWS
November 2, 1988
South Africa has reportedly agreed to the gist of a U.S. proposal to grant independence to South-West Africa--also known as Namibia--within a year and let Cuban troops remain in neighboring Angola for up to two years, two leading South African newspapers reported. Under this plan, South African forces would withdraw from Namibia and U.S.-sponsored elections would take place, the Citizen, a pro-government newspaper, and Business Day, the country's leading financial daily, said.
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