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United States Foreign Relations Nicaragua

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NEWS
January 11, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. and Honduran troops began their latest round of joint military maneuvers Saturday in this country's tense southern border region not far from the scene of recent fighting between Nicaraguan troops and anti-Sandinista rebels. About 220 soldiers from the 27th Engineers Brigade of the U.S. Army's 20th Combat Airborne Force based at Ft. Bragg, N.C., parachuted from C-141 transport airplanes for an exercise that will upgrade the U.S.
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NEWS
September 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Daniel Ortega, a pariah in Washington during the 1980s as leader of Nicaragua's leftist Sandinista government, said he backs the U.S. war on terrorism. "The U.S. government stance is to combat, eradicate and isolate this type of terrorist attack, and we fully share this position," Ortega told reporters. Ortega helped lead the revolution that deposed dictator Anastasio Somoza in 1979 and later fought U.S.-backed Contra rebels in a civil war that claimed about 30,000 lives.
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NEWS
January 31, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Sacramento Bureau Chief
American rancher James Jordan Denby, jailed since being shot down while flying his light plane over Nicaragua on Dec. 6, was released Saturday into the custody of Democratic U.S. Senate contender Bill Press of California. Denby, 58, who had been accused of working with the Contras, then flew with Press to Los Angeles in a chartered luxury jet.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Central Intelligence Agency had indications that about 50 members of Nicaraguan rebel organizations may have been involved in narcotics trafficking during the 1980s, but CIA personnel continued working with almost two dozen of the suspected figures, U.S. intelligence officials said Friday.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration lost its first test of wills with Violeta Barrios de Chamorro when an assistant secretary of state, Bernard Aronson, came here to warn her against keeping Sandinista Defense Minister Humberto Ortega as head of the army. "But Senor Aronson," replied the opposition publisher who had defeated the Sandinista revolutionaries in national elections. "Nicaragua is a family. We have to find peace among ourselves."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1988 | BRYNA BRENNAN, Associated Press
A film about an American adventurer who took over Nicaragua more than 100 years ago was a box-office flop in the United States, but it has been drawing long lines in Managua. A downtown movie house has been packed since the film "Walker" opened Feb. 25. That's an unusual occurrence because the $5 tickets cost more than many workers earn in a day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1992 | DAVID A. AVILA
Nicaraguans in Orange County are frantically trying to reach their families and friends back home in the wake of a massive earthquake and tidal wave that devastated the Central American country. Many are finding it difficult to reach relatives in Nicaragua because of the damaged telephone lines. Rodrigo Vega, 26, who just moved to Santa Ana last year, has many relatives still living in Masachapa, a coastal town that experienced severe damage.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, who urged Congress in his State of the Union speech to approve renewed aid to the Nicaraguan Contras, intends to dramatize that appeal by sending Secretary of State George P. Shultz on a peace mission to Central America, Administration officials said Monday. They said that the proposed trip marks a last-ditch effort to defuse growing congressional opposition to more Contra aid by demonstrating White House willingness to support the region's stalled peace process.
SPORTS
August 6, 1990 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several years ago, at the height of the Nicaraguan contra war, a story began making the rounds in Managua about a clash between government troops and U.S.-backed rebels. Seems that, during one of the infrequent breaks in the fighting, a Sandinista army patrol surprised a group of guerrillas. With a cease-fire in effect, the two armies marked off an open field and decided to settle their differences by playing baseball.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Nicaragua proposed on Saturday that the cease-fire to be negotiated in its war with U.S.-backed contras require the insurgents to surrender their arms at once and consider an offer of amnesty. The proposal differs sharply from that of the Nicaraguan Resistance, as the contras formally call themselves, which seeks to freeze the battlefield positions of armed guerrillas and the Sandinista army until international supervisors verify Managua's compliance with promised democratic reforms.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has promised to help Nicaragua fight the growing transshipment of South American drugs in that country by opening an anti-narcotics office in Managua, the capital. A Drug Enforcement Administration office, which usually is accompanied by substantial anti-drug money and equipment, will open this year at the request of the Nicaraguan government, the U.S. Embassy in Managua has announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1996 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an outpouring of anger over a controversy rapidly gaining velocity in Los Angeles' African American community, about 2,000 people converged on the Crenshaw district Saturday to demand that U.S. government officials be held accountable for alleged complicity in the city's deadly scourge of crack cocaine. The emotional crowd was drawn to the event, co-sponsored by the Congressional Black Caucus and black-owned radio station KJLH-FM (102.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1996 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newspaper reports that the CIA may have eased the way for a Latin American cocaine ring to push tons of the drug into South-Central Los Angeles are creating a firestorm of political and social reaction. The claims, published last month by the San Jose Mercury News, have a special resonance among African Americans because black neighborhoods have been the hardest hit by the crack cocaine epidemic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two standing ovations, numerous autographs, dozens of flashbulbs popping in his face and countless displays of spontaneous applause Friday, former Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North was ready to field his first question. The young man approached the microphone in the brightly lit Saddleback College gym and wanted to know about a recent newspaper series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno says a preliminary inquiry by the Department of Justice does not substantiate published allegations that the CIA acted in support of a Northern California drug ring that smuggled cocaine from Latin America to South-Central Los Angeles. Last month, the San Jose Mercury News published a series of articles saying the CIA blocked efforts by other agencies to stem the drug ring in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | From Reuters
Nineteen of 20 U.S. diplomats ordered expelled from Nicaragua in reprisal for a raid on the Nicaraguan ambassador's residence in Panama City left Managua on Monday for Miami. The group, short one diplomat who was visiting the United States at the time the expulsion was announced, was given 72 hours to get out of Nicaragua by President Daniel Ortega on Saturday in retaliation for the raid Friday night. U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1988 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
House Speaker Jim Wright said Sunday that it is "high time" for the United States to press the Soviet Union to cut off military aid to the Sandinistas. "I think it's something we should demand, and I think it's something that must be forthcoming," said the Texas Democrat, who suggested that President Reagan and Administration officials discuss the issue in upcoming meetings with Soviet leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1992 | DAVID A. AVILA
Nicaraguans in Orange County are frantically trying to reach their families and friends back home in the wake of a massive earthquake and tidal wave that devastated the Central American country. Many are finding it difficult to reach relatives in Nicaragua because of the damaged telephone lines. Rodrigo Vega, 26, who just moved to Santa Ana last year, has many relatives still living in Masachapa, a coastal town that experienced severe damage.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With elections scheduled for October in Peru, the Bush Administration has slightly relaxed its freeze on aid to the government of President Alberto Fujimori, a State Department official said Wednesday. Fujimori angered Washington and other Western Hemisphere governments April 12 when he suspended the Peruvian Congress, ousted the country's judges and suspended all political parties.
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