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United States Foreign Relations Nicaragua

NEWS
March 6, 1990 | Times Staff Writer
Bush Administration officials met Monday with advisers to Nicaraguan President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro and said afterward that they plan to propose hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. aid for Nicaragua even before Chamorro is inaugurated April 25. Both American and Nicaraguan officials who participated in the talks declined to divulge the amount under discussion.
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NEWS
March 5, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief commander of the Nicaraguan Contra army, an M-16 slung across his back and fresh ammunition around his belly, stood on a brush-covered hillside and spoke to about 1,500 troops lined up in a valley below him: After more than eight years of war, it was time to disband and go home to Nicaragua. As Comandante Franklin spoke, a voice piped up from the ranks: "A question, comandante!" a soldier shouted. "What if the Sandinistas play a dirty trick and turn on us?"
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two U.S. senators called on Nicaragua's Sandinista army and the Contra rebels Saturday to turn in their weapons to help preserve the peace in their own country and to prevent their arsenals from fueling the civil war in El Salvador. Sens. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) and Phil Gramm (R-Tex.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country will seek $302 million in cash from the United States to revive food production and jump-start its war-battered economy in the first year of Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's post-revolutionary government, her chief economic adviser said Friday.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and members of Congress gleefully hailed Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's surprise victory in Nicaragua's presidential election Monday and promised that the United States will supply aid to rebuild her country's economy, crippled by a decade of guerrilla war. But U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violeta Barrios de Chamorro captured Nicaragua's presidency in a historic and decisive electoral defeat of a leftist revolutionary movement that had seized power by force of arms, partial election returns showed Monday. President Daniel Ortega, his face drawn by a long night of painful reckoning, conceded defeat at dawn Monday in a moving valedictory on his decade-old Sandinista revolution.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Sunday that if the Nicaraguan elections are certified as free and fair, the new government in Managua "will find a better climate" in the United States--so long as it adheres to democratic principles. A free and fair election would be "very, very helpful," the President declared Sunday morning, just hours after balloting began in Nicaragua. "A democratic process is important," Bush added.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years ago, this town of artisans and craftsmen rose up in arms against dictator Anastasio Somoza, earning its name as the "cradle" of the Sandinista revolution. In a dusty settlement 30 miles away, factory workers and market vendors built a clandestine network of safehouses for the leftist Sandinista guerrillas, who would later name the settlement Ciudad Sandino--after their hero, Cesar Augusto Sandino.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, a widowed newspaper publisher, appeared headed for a stunning upset of Sandinista President Daniel Ortega in Sunday's Nicaraguan elections, according to voting results collected and analyzed by the Los Angeles Times. A Times projection based on vote tallies from a nationwide sample of representative polling places showed that Chamorro will get more than 50% of the votes and that Ortega will finish with a percentage in the low 40s.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Jimmy Carter was president, Sandinista guerrillas overthrew a U.S.-backed dictator and ended more than a century of strong American influence in Nicaragua. Today, after nearly a decade of hostilities with Washington, the Sandinistas have invited Carter here as one of the chief judges of an election that they hope will heal the wounds of another guerrilla war and end the hostilities.
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