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United States Foreign Relations Nigeria

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NEWS
October 20, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Tuesday pledged to at least triple U.S. foreign aid to Nigeria, rewarding Africa's most populous country for its democratic government and efforts against narcotics trafficking. "I never stopped hoping that, during my time as secretary of State, I would be able to visit a Nigeria whole and free," Albright told a news conference as Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo beamed in approval. "And here I am."
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NEWS
August 28, 2000 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton warned Nigerians on Sunday that their impressive new democracy will be imperiled unless they openly and aggressively tackle the problem of HIV and AIDS. "AIDS can rob a country of its future," Clinton told a predominantly female crowd at the National Center for Women's Development in Abuja, the capital.
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NEWS
October 8, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher arrived in Mali on Monday on the first leg of a five-nation trek across Africa during which he will try to tighten the squeeze on outlaw regimes, encourage democratic reforms and find a new secretary-general for the United Nations. On his weeklong tour, Christopher revealed Monday, he will launch a new round of diplomacy aimed at further isolating Nigeria's military regime, led by Gen. Sani Abacha, by means of selective new sanctions.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after President Clinton excluded Africa's most populous nation from his historic two-week trek through the continent, he arrived in Nigeria on Saturday to acclaim its nascent democracy and challenge its leaders to stay their course to lead all of Africa toward a better future.
SPORTS
June 9, 1994 | Associated Press
The United States embassy in Lagos said Nigeria's World Cup team cannot arrive aboard a Nigeria Airways flight but must use another airline. The United States last year banned the airline from flying to New York and U.S. airlines from flying to Nigeria, claiming safety concerns in Lagos. The move came after military ruler Gen. Ibrahim Babangida annulled June 12 presidential elections.
NEWS
August 28, 2000 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton warned Nigerians on Sunday that their impressive new democracy will be imperiled unless they openly and aggressively tackle the problem of HIV and AIDS. "AIDS can rob a country of its future," Clinton told a predominantly female crowd at the National Center for Women's Development in Abuja, the capital.
NEWS
March 24, 1995 | From Reuters
Former Nigerian military leader Gen. Olusegun Obasanjo has been released from detention in response to a plea by former President Jimmy Carter but is restricted to his hometown, Nigeria's information minister said Thursday. "Because of the intervention of President Carter, Gen. Obasanjo has been allowed to stay at his hometown, but he is still restricted pending completion of investigation," Walter Ofonagoro said.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Almost every day for the last year, a Nigerian courier has been arrested at some major U.S. airport with enough narcotics concealed on his or her body to make someone rich in this overpopulated African country. And U.S. officials estimate that 10 shipments get through for every one that is intercepted. Secretary of State George P. Shultz said Monday that he was assured by Nigerian officials of their intensified efforts to stop the traffic.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a step that drew an almost instantaneous rebuke from the Clinton Administration, Nigeria's military dictatorship annulled the June 12 presidential election Wednesday and canceled plans to return Africa's most populous nation to civilian rule. Describing the election as "orderly, fair and free from any serious irregularities," State Department spokesman Mike McCurry said the Administration will suspend a $22.8-million-a-year aid program and is reconsidering all other aspects of U.S.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE
ICN Pharmaceuticals has answered an emergency request to ship its antiviral drug ribavirin to Nigeria to combat an apparent outbreak of African Lassa fever, the Costa Mesa-based pharmaceutical company said Tuesday. According to ICN, the request came from the Ministry of Health in Nigeria and was directed to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. The recent outbreak has claimed several lives, according to the company.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Tuesday pledged to at least triple U.S. foreign aid to Nigeria, rewarding Africa's most populous country for its democratic government and efforts against narcotics trafficking. "I never stopped hoping that, during my time as secretary of State, I would be able to visit a Nigeria whole and free," Albright told a news conference as Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo beamed in approval. "And here I am."
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher arrived in Mali on Monday on the first leg of a five-nation trek across Africa during which he will try to tighten the squeeze on outlaw regimes, encourage democratic reforms and find a new secretary-general for the United Nations. On his weeklong tour, Christopher revealed Monday, he will launch a new round of diplomacy aimed at further isolating Nigeria's military regime, led by Gen. Sani Abacha, by means of selective new sanctions.
NEWS
March 24, 1995 | From Reuters
Former Nigerian military leader Gen. Olusegun Obasanjo has been released from detention in response to a plea by former President Jimmy Carter but is restricted to his hometown, Nigeria's information minister said Thursday. "Because of the intervention of President Carter, Gen. Obasanjo has been allowed to stay at his hometown, but he is still restricted pending completion of investigation," Walter Ofonagoro said.
SPORTS
June 10, 1994
The United States will relax its ban on Nigerian flights to allow soccer players and their fans to attend the World Cup, the official news agency said Thursday. The U.S. Embassy in Lagos, which announced Wednesday that Nigeria Airways could not fly to the United States, said it was unable to confirm the Nigerian report. "It's more complicated than that," embassy spokeswoman Arlene Jacquette said. She said she could say no more about the matter until today.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a step that drew an almost instantaneous rebuke from the Clinton Administration, Nigeria's military dictatorship annulled the June 12 presidential election Wednesday and canceled plans to return Africa's most populous nation to civilian rule. Describing the election as "orderly, fair and free from any serious irregularities," State Department spokesman Mike McCurry said the Administration will suspend a $22.8-million-a-year aid program and is reconsidering all other aspects of U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
What a difference Ade makes: Before the groundbreaking 1984 U.S. tour of King Sunny Ade and His African Beats, the American concept of African music was pretty much informed by jungle-movie images of guys jabbering and banging on logs, or by bongo-happy budget-label records with titles like "Savage Stereo Rhythms."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
What a difference Ade makes: Before the groundbreaking 1984 U.S. tour of King Sunny Ade and His African Beats, the American concept of African music was pretty much informed by jungle-movie images of guys jabbering and banging on logs, or by bongo-happy budget-label records with titles like "Savage Stereo Rhythms."
BUSINESS
March 22, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE
ICN Pharmaceuticals has answered an emergency request to ship its antiviral drug ribavirin to Nigeria to combat an apparent outbreak of African Lassa fever, the Costa Mesa-based pharmaceutical company said Tuesday. According to ICN, the request came from the Ministry of Health in Nigeria and was directed to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. The recent outbreak has claimed several lives, according to the company.
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