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United States Foreign Relations North Korea

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NEWS
February 22, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, American and South Korean military planners have studied what they sometimes call the Second Korean War. They have played out the war games and the scenarios aren't pretty. "The north's plan has two options to it," explains Paul Godwin of the Defense Department's National War College, an expert on Asian military affairs who has played the role of a North Korean in the war games. "One is to take Seoul quickly and sue for peace.
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NEWS
February 28, 2002 | BARBARA DEMICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung urged North Korea on Wednesday to accept President Bush's offer of a dialogue and to live up to earlier promises made to South Korea before the window of opportunity for negotiations closes. In an interview with The Times, his first with the foreign press since last week's meeting here with Bush, Kim offered unusually blunt words about North Korea.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1988 | From United Press International
Two brothers, on trial since December for allegedly violating the Trading With the Enemy Act by shipping helicopters to North Korea, pleaded guilty unexpectedly Wednesday and were sentenced to prison. Ronald Semler, 44, of Malibu, and Barry Semler, 38, of Santa Barbara, had been on trial in Los Angeles federal court on charges that they shipped 87 helicopters to North Korea and plotted to ship 15 more in violation of the act, which prohibits trade with that Communist country.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With frustration mounting in the two Koreas over the Bush administration's slow pace in crafting a North Korea policy and apparent reluctance to negotiate with the Stalinist regime, Seoul and Pyongyang sent a not-so-subtle message to Washington this week: If you're not willing to provide diplomatic leadership, we'll ask Europe to pick up some of the slack.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
The bodies of five American servicemen killed nearly 40 years ago in the Korean War were returned to their countrymen Monday in an emotional Memorial Day ceremony marking them as heroes. It was the first return of U.S. Korean War dead from Communist North Korea since 1954. More than 8,000 Americans from the 1950-53 conflict are still unaccounted for. Five brown caskets and five small boxes containing buttons, dog tags, boots and pieces of uniforms were turned over to eight U.S.
NEWS
January 31, 2000 | By TYLER MARSHALL,
After months of midlevel talks, North Korea and the United States have agreed to take their delicate diplomatic dance to a higher level, with a senior North Korean diplomat visiting Washington at the end of March, State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said Sunday. Rubin said the North Koreans have accepted a standing invitation extended by the U.S. for a senior member of the regime in Pyongyang to travel to Washington.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House abandoned a major economic weapon against renegade nations Wednesday and said the United States would no longer restrict their purchase of American food, medicine and medical supplies. The announcement marks a major departure in U.S. economic, foreign and farm policy. As a result, Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea and Sudan could eventually gain access to U.S. supplies, which have been largely off limits.
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
There was no sign of progress Saturday in U.S. efforts to gain access to a suspected North Korean underground nuclear weapon site. North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Kim Gye Gwan said the first day of the latest round of talks in Geneva had failed to narrow the "huge gap" between Pyongyang and Washington. The United States has rejected North Korean demands for $300 million as an entry fee to the Kumchangni underground site, which Washington presumes to be nuclear-related.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The security threat posed by North Korea has increased "considerably" in the years since President Clinton launched a policy of engagement with the Communist state, a task force of House Republicans charged in a report issued Wednesday. The report, commissioned by House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) in August, asserts that the United States is unable to defend itself adequately against the North Korean threat.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Friday announced that the United States will move immediately to ease commercial and trade sanctions against one of the world's most isolated and notorious nations, North Korea. White House Press Secretary Joe Lockhart said the administration will normalize trade in most consumer goods and other commercial products between the United States and North Korea. The U.S. will also permit transfers of personal and commercial funds and will open commercial air and sea cargo links.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | H.G. REZA and SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Mission Viejo man who served as a liaison between St. Timothy's Catholic Church in Laguna Niguel and a rural Mexican orphanage it supported was cleared of child molestation charges Thursday after spending 6 1/2 years in prison. David Cathcart, 59, was declared not guilty after four boys who had claimed he lured them into sexual acts recanted their accusations, saying they had been coerced into lying by the orphanage's director, Mexican authorities said. Judge Marta Flores Trejo announced the ruling Thursday and asked government officials to conduct a formal investigation into the Puerta de Fe, or Door of Faith, orphanage and its director, Gabriel Diego Garcia.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung's visit to Washington has brought forth the first significant change by the Bush administration in U.S. policy toward Asia. With a few brief remarks by President Bush on Wednesday and further explanations by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Thursday, the new administration threw cold water on the Clinton administration's efforts last fall to bring about a speedy rapprochement with the Communist regime in North Korea. "What the president was saying . . .
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House International Relations Committee and the panel's ranking Democrat urged President Bush on Friday to shelve a controversial nuclear power deal with North Korea until the administration conducts a thorough review of the policy. In a letter to the president, the lawmakers warned Bush that U.S. allies--South Korea in particular--will ask him to push ahead with the agreement.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
In a sharp outburst Thursday, North Korea threatened to scrap missile and nuclear accords with Washington and railed against the Bush administration's plans for a missile defense system. The new U.S. administration's foreign and national security teams are adopting a "hard-line stance" toward Pyongyang, the Foreign Ministry said in a statement carried in English by the official Korean Central News Agency. Washington wants Pyongyang "to totally disarm itself first. The U.S.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In talks here with Japanese officials, the Bush administration indicated Friday that it is willing to pursue rapprochement with North Korea if the Communist regime moves toward a formal agreement on limiting sales and export of its long-range missiles, a senior U.S. official said. The North Korean deal is one of the most important foreign policy initiatives left hanging at the end of the Clinton administration after the first direct visit by a U.S. secretary of State to North Korea in October.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | From the Washington Post
President Clinton on Thursday ended speculation that he might visit North Korea before the end of his term, saying "there is not enough time" to conclude an agreement with Pyongyang on curbing its development and export of ballistic missiles. In a written statement, Clinton said he continues to believe that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il is committed to reaching such an accord and that the United States has a "clear national interest in seeing it through."
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As what are sure to be tense talks between the United States and North Korea begin in Berlin today, U.S., Japanese and South Korean officials have a message for concerned or frustrated observers: "To jaw-jaw always is better than to war-war."
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. envoy William J. Perry arrived Tuesday in North Korea, hoping to meet the Communist country's enigmatic ruler and persuade the government to abandon its suspected nuclear arms and missile programs. Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan met Perry at the Pyongyang airport, the North's official news agency said in a brief dispatch monitored in Seoul.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Korean American pastor Hee-Min Park of Young Nak Presbyterian Church in Los Angeles was conducting the funeral service for a 95-year-old member of his congregation Monday, when the tragedy of his divided homeland stabbed him in the heart once again. "Here he was, dying in America after being separated from his wife for 50 years," said Park, senior pastor of the 8,000-member church.
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