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United States Foreign Relations Northern Ireland

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NEWS
July 28, 1995 | From Associated Press
Rejecting a federal judge's findings of probable persecution, an appeals court Thursday ordered the extradition to Northern Ireland of a nationalist who escaped in 1983 while serving a sentence for attempted murder. James Joseph Smyth's extradition was barred last September by U.S. District Judge Barbara Caulfield.
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NEWS
December 12, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton prepared Monday for his farewell trip to Northern Ireland, Protestant and Roman Catholic legislators hammered out bills on dangerous dogs, drunk driving and e-mail, and accused each other of reneging on the Good Friday peace agreement. The routine, almost mundane, work by former blood enemies underlined the gains of the April 1998 peace accord that Clinton is coming to celebrate, while the mutual recriminations illustrated the enormous hurdles he will prod them to overcome.
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NEWS
November 19, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When U.S. negotiator George J. Mitchell summoned Protestant and Roman Catholic leaders to his borrowed office almost 11 weeks ago to try to salvage the Good Friday peace agreement, he found their dialogue--if you could call it that-- to be "harsh and filled with recrimination." Nearly a year and a half after signing the accord, Ulster Unionist Party chief David Trimble and Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams still were uncomfortable in the same room together.
NEWS
November 28, 2000
President Clinton will make a farewell visit to Northern Ireland on Dec. 12-14 in a bid to overcome difficulties in the Irish peace process, the White House announced. Clinton has played a major role in Northern Ireland's difficult journey toward an uneasy peace, giving support to British-Irish initiatives that led to the landmark 1998 Good Friday peace accord.
NEWS
April 15, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Protestant politicians Tuesday sent a message--loud and clear--to President Clinton, who has said he might visit here to campaign for a "yes" vote in this British-ruled province's May referendum, part of the newly approved peace process. The message: Stay home. "I don't think it will be helpful, at this stage, for the president of the U.S.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assassins claimed a Protestant shopkeeper and a Roman Catholic taxi driver as the latest victims of sectarian hatred in Northern Ireland on Monday, while the limping quest for peace between Catholics and Protestants survived a confrontation between British Prime Minister Tony Blair and dissatisfied leaders of Sinn Fein, the political wing of the IRA. The United States, meanwhile, was drawn into controversy over Northern Ireland when Raymond Seitz, a former U.S.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton offered sober encouragement to the people of violence-weary Northern Ireland on Thursday, applauding their support for the peace process but cautioning that the test of their commitment will come when more terrorist bombs explode. "The terror in Omagh was not the last bomb of the Troubles," Clinton said in a speech here, using the broadly accepted term for the 30 years of sectarian violence in the province. "It was the opening shot of the vicious attack on peace."
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton prepared Monday for his farewell trip to Northern Ireland, Protestant and Roman Catholic legislators hammered out bills on dangerous dogs, drunk driving and e-mail, and accused each other of reneging on the Good Friday peace agreement. The routine, almost mundane, work by former blood enemies underlined the gains of the April 1998 peace accord that Clinton is coming to celebrate, while the mutual recriminations illustrated the enormous hurdles he will prod them to overcome.
NEWS
November 28, 2000
President Clinton will make a farewell visit to Northern Ireland on Dec. 12-14 in a bid to overcome difficulties in the Irish peace process, the White House announced. Clinton has played a major role in Northern Ireland's difficult journey toward an uneasy peace, giving support to British-Irish initiatives that led to the landmark 1998 Good Friday peace accord.
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | From Reuters
Leading members of Northern Ireland's pro-British Protestant unionist party will attend the White House's St. Patrick's Day celebrations next week while their Sinn Fein foes will be excluded because of IRA violence. David Trimble, leader of the mainstream Ulster Unionist Party, has accepted an invitation from President Clinton to attend the festivities. "It is a dramatic turn of events.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Northern Ireland peace process suffered a devastating blow Friday when Britain pulled the plug on Belfast's fledgling power-sharing government and resumed direct control of the province after just nine weeks of self-rule.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When U.S. negotiator George J. Mitchell summoned Protestant and Roman Catholic leaders to his borrowed office almost 11 weeks ago to try to salvage the Good Friday peace agreement, he found their dialogue--if you could call it that-- to be "harsh and filled with recrimination." Nearly a year and a half after signing the accord, Ulster Unionist Party chief David Trimble and Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams still were uncomfortable in the same room together.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton offered sober encouragement to the people of violence-weary Northern Ireland on Thursday, applauding their support for the peace process but cautioning that the test of their commitment will come when more terrorist bombs explode. "The terror in Omagh was not the last bomb of the Troubles," Clinton said in a speech here, using the broadly accepted term for the 30 years of sectarian violence in the province. "It was the opening shot of the vicious attack on peace."
NEWS
April 15, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Protestant politicians Tuesday sent a message--loud and clear--to President Clinton, who has said he might visit here to campaign for a "yes" vote in this British-ruled province's May referendum, part of the newly approved peace process. The message: Stay home. "I don't think it will be helpful, at this stage, for the president of the U.S.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The quiet man from America crossed the Atlantic upward of 100 times--so often he's lost count--and heard the same arguments and objections many more times than that. On occasion, he said as he suppressed a yawn early this morning, he thought his task could never be completed. "There were many times I thought, 'Gosh, am I wasting my time?' " George J. Mitchell remembered, speaking on the telephone from his hotel room. "And it's funny--they themselves never thought they could do it."
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ireland has too long and tumultuous a past to allow anything approaching blithe optimism. "History is indeed a difficult prison to escape from, and the history of Ireland is as difficult as any," historian Robert Kee has observed. So not surprisingly, Kathleen McPeake, 51, hurrying home from shopping with the youngest of her three sons in Belfast's heavily Roman Catholic neighborhood of Falls Road, was skeptical when asked her thoughts about a peace deal for Northern Ireland.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a new overture in the peace process, Patrick Mayhew, Britain's Northern Ireland secretary, invited Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams to meet him informally in Washington next week. It would be the highest level yet of contacts between the British government and Sinn Fein, the political arm of the militant Irish Republican Army, or IRA. The announcement here was welcomed by Irish Republicans and fiercely criticized by Northern Ireland unionists.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Clinton named retiring Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) as a special adviser to promote trade and investment in Northern Ireland. The announcement came as the British government said it will meet face to face for the first time with leaders of Sinn Fein, the political arm of the Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the boldest bid at healing the wounds that still fester almost eight decades after Ireland's partition, the leaders of Britain, the Irish Republic and local political parties on Good Friday signed a peace and power-sharing agreement meant to end bloodshed between this province's Protestant and Roman Catholic communities. Seventeen and a half hours after a self-imposed midnight deadline, and following repeated phone intervention by President Clinton, George J.
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On St. Patrick's Day, President Clinton invited an array of political leaders to a White House reception marking the ultimate Irish holiday. Although the event celebrated Irish heritage, it also had a clear, calculated political purpose. Not by chance, the guest list that night included most key participants in the Northern Ireland peace talks, and Clinton seized the chance to personally press for agreement.
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