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United States Foreign Relations Pakistan

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August 18, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan pledged Wednesday that U.S. military aid for Pakistan will continue undiminished despite the death in a plane crash of autocratic President Zia ul-Haq, but American foreign policy experts said a period of instability that could damage U.S. policy from Afghanistan to the Persian Gulf is almost a certainty.
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NEWS
December 29, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than three months of single-minded concentration on defeating terrorism, the Bush administration faces a potentially more dangerous foreign policy crisis in the confrontation between nuclear-armed India and Pakistan. Unlike with the Sept. 11 attacks, which produced a quick military response, the administration must move far more subtly in trying to mediate between two countries that are playing key roles in the war against terrorism.
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NEWS
August 18, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Brig. Gen. Herbert M. Wassom, 49, the Army officer who died Wednesday in the plane crash that killed Pakistani President Zia ul-Haq and U.S. Ambassador Arnold L. Raphel, was a decorated Vietnam War veteran who for the last year had overseen U.S. military aid to Pakistan. Wassom, as chief U.S.
NEWS
October 13, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Anti-American protesters rallied across Pakistan on Friday, burning President Bush in effigy and shouting lustily, "Death to America!" But instead of being perturbed, authorities were relieved that they had kept the numbers low and the rage under control. The demonstrations, coming after prayers on the traditional day for protests, had been well advertised.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pakistani government flouted international opinion again Saturday by announcing its sixth nuclear test, and then it all but invited world leaders to broker a peace between it and archrival India. The test, a single atomic explosion in the Baluchistan desert, followed Pakistan's claim of five detonations Thursday. The tests were intended to answer the five tests carried out by India earlier this month.
NEWS
August 12, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Saudi Arabian tycoon Ghaith R. Pharaon was sailing aboard his three-stateroom yacht in the Mediterranean last week, one of Pakistan's most powerful government ministers leaned back in his chair here and effectively extended the open arms of his nation to the man U.S. prosecutors say helped to mastermind what they call the biggest international bank fraud in history.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A deal struck in Washington to end the border war on the Indian subcontinent failed to take hold Monday, as fighting raged in the Himalayas and the Pakistani military vowed to keep its ground. A day after Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, meeting with President Clinton in Washington, agreed to rein in troops who sparked a bloody and dangerous skirmish with India, few signs emerged that the deal was falling into place.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Clinton agreed to meet in Washington with Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif today to discuss resolving the Asian nation's increasingly "dangerous" conflict with India over long-disputed Kashmir, the White House said. Before agreeing to the meeting, Clinton conferred by telephone with Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee, said a White House official who declined to be named. Officials said Sharif requested the meeting.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Indian army troops captured more peaks, and Pakistani shells blew up an oil tanker, as battles in Kashmir raged despite an agreement between President Clinton and Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to push for peace. There has been no slackening of nearly ceaseless shelling from both sides in the past two months. The Indian military, reporting some of the bloodiest fighting yet, said 55 mercenaries and nine Indian soldiers were killed in an all-night battle.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to prevent South Asia's escalating arms race from spiraling into war, the United States this week will launch an international effort to defuse the flash points underlying half a century of hostility, senior U.S. officials said Monday. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright will meet Thursday in Geneva with her counterparts from the four other permanent members of the U.N. Security Council. Until last month, the five nations were the world's only declared nuclear powers.
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Chinese government denied assisting Pakistan's nuclear missile program, saying it adhered fully to international appeals to discourage the buildup of nuclear weapons in South Asia. Allegations that Beijing has provided Pakistan with weapons-grade steel, missile guidance systems and technical advice were "totally unfounded and with ulterior motives," said Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Sun Yuxi. U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 2000 | From Reuters
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Sunday that concerns about terrorism will not lead to sanctions against Greece and Pakistan, no matter what a new congressional report may say. A congressional panel recommends the United States change the way it tackles terrorism by taking several measures, among them threatening sanctions against states such as Greece and Pakistan and increasing the power of the CIA and Army to act in the United States.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton met for more than an hour and a half Saturday with Pakistani Gen. Pervez Musharraf, but he failed to win any concessions from this nation's military ruler that might defuse the volatile standoff in South Asia. Senior officials said Clinton secured no promises from Musharraf to stop guerrillas based in Pakistan from crossing into the Indian region of Kashmir, where a violent insurgency has brought the two countries to the brink of open conflict.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton intends to warn Pakistan's military rulers Saturday that their "obsession" with the contested Himalayan region of Kashmir could prove "very, very damaging" to their country, possibly even leading to its collapse, a senior administration official said Thursday.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton opened his five-day tour of India on Tuesday by endorsing New Delhi's position on the volatile region of Kashmir, rejecting calls by longtime U.S. ally Pakistan to referee the dispute. Standing with Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee, Clinton implored the subcontinent's two nuclear-armed rivals to refrain from attacking each other across the 450-mile contested border known as the Line of Control.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the pageantry that will envelop President Clinton when he arrives here today to begin a weeklong tour of South Asia, a sobering task awaits him: stopping a war before it starts. The subcontinent's two nuclear-armed rivals, India and Pakistan, are embroiled in their worst relations in a quarter of a century. Fighting along their 450-mile disputed border, still covered in Himalayan snow, is raging with an intensity ordinarily reserved for summer.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A director of Karachi-based Forte Trading Co. Ltd. says a Pakistani man claiming to be a nuclear scientist with confidential information about his country's weapons program is actually a former low-level accountant at his company, which makes ceramic tiles and bathroom fixtures. Iftikhar Chaudhry Khan, 29, is seeking asylum in New York, saying he fled Pakistan after learning of plans to use nuclear weapons against India. Khan says he was a scientist with the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under international pressure to curb nuclear tensions in South Asia, India indicated publicly for the first time Thursday that it aims to complete negotiations so a global nuclear test-ban treaty can go into effect within a year. But in an address at the U.N. General Assembly in New York, Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee did not specifically promise to sign the accord, a key component of international efforts to end the nuclear arms race.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After weeks of hand-wringing, the White House announced Tuesday that President Clinton will stop in Pakistan for talks with the country's military leadership during a five-day visit to South Asia later this month that will also take him to India, Pakistan's archrival.
NEWS
January 26, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Tuesday that his administration has no evidence implicating the Pakistani government in last month's hijacking of an Indian Airlines jet despite the role apparently played by a notorious Kashmiri guerrilla group that has received backing from Islamabad. "We do not have evidence that the Pakistani government was in any way involved in that hijacking," Clinton told a White House news conference.
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