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NEWS
March 30, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush urged both sides in the Middle East conflict Thursday to pull back from the latest burst of bloodshed but saved his harshest rhetoric for Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, implying that the veteran guerrilla could stop the violence if he wanted to do so. Speaking at a White House news conference, Bush called on the Palestinian Authority president to speak out "forcibly . . . to condemn violence and terrorism."
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NEWS
March 30, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush urged both sides in the Middle East conflict Thursday to pull back from the latest burst of bloodshed but saved his harshest rhetoric for Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, implying that the veteran guerrilla could stop the violence if he wanted to do so. Speaking at a White House news conference, Bush called on the Palestinian Authority president to speak out "forcibly . . . to condemn violence and terrorism."
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NEWS
January 12, 2001 | From Associated Press
Israel and the Palestinians resumed high-level peace talks Thursday after a rapid series of conciliatory gestures and a drop in violence, pushing for some kind of last-minute deal before President Clinton leaves office. But the session ended after about three hours with no indication of any progress having been made.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to overcome what he called the "demonization" of his hard-line record, Israeli opposition leader Ariel Sharon told a U.S. audience Wednesday that he wants President Bush to participate in the Middle East peace process--as long as he doesn't pressure Israel to make concessions. The hawkish Sharon, who enjoys an overwhelming lead in opinion polls over caretaker Prime Minister Ehud Barak in advance of Israel's Feb.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to overcome what he called the "demonization" of his hard-line record, Israeli opposition leader Ariel Sharon told a U.S. audience Wednesday that he wants President Bush to participate in the Middle East peace process--as long as he doesn't pressure Israel to make concessions. The hawkish Sharon, who enjoys an overwhelming lead in opinion polls over caretaker Prime Minister Ehud Barak in advance of Israel's Feb.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a diplomatic shove from the United States, senior Israeli and Palestinian officials soon--probably Sunday--will conduct face-to-face, official talks on the Mideast peace process for the first time in months. While that alone might be reason for optimism here, given the atmosphere of distrust that has enveloped the peace process, no one Friday was predicting a breakthrough. In fact, Israeli, Palestinian and U.S.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. mediators met separately with Israeli and Palestinian negotiators Tuesday in a last-chance effort to find a solution for the continuing Middle East violence and restore the momentum toward a peace agreement before President Clinton leaves office. The talks, held under tight security at an Air Force base in Washington, face extremely long odds after 12 weeks of Israeli-Palestinian violence that have left more than 325 people dead, about 85% of them Palestinians.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli forces clashed with Palestinians in the streets of several West Bank towns Friday, leaving two dead and about 200 injured. However, the overall intensity of violence in the region appeared to be easing after a declared truce. For a second day, leaders on both sides called for restraint and worked to cool the charged atmosphere so that a cease-fire announced early Thursday could take hold. Other steps also were underway to regenerate movement toward peace.
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Israeli and Palestinian leaders failed early today to reach agreement on a U.S.-brokered exit from the region's deadliest violence in years, fueling fears that bloodshed that has raged for seven straight days will continue unchecked. Contentious talks that lasted a day and a night in Paris broke down over details of an agreement that a French official had said was "90%" completed.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Israeli and Palestinian negotiators aimed to reach agreement on an American peace initiative in a second round of closed talks. The meeting at a kibbutz outside Jerusalem came one day after the sides held their first high-level talks in months. The talks were urged by the United States, which, after months of mediation, failed to get Israel to agree to withdraw its troops from an additional 13% of West Bank land.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | From Associated Press
Israel and the Palestinians resumed high-level peace talks Thursday after a rapid series of conciliatory gestures and a drop in violence, pushing for some kind of last-minute deal before President Clinton leaves office. But the session ended after about three hours with no indication of any progress having been made.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With continuing violence lengthening the already enormous odds against success, President Clinton tried Tuesday to coax Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat into accepting a U.S.-drafted framework to restart the moribund Middle East peace process. Clinton and Arafat, originally scheduled to meet for 90 minutes or less, conferred for almost 3 1/2 hours in two separate sessions, ending after 10 p.m.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. mediators met separately with Israeli and Palestinian negotiators Tuesday in a last-chance effort to find a solution for the continuing Middle East violence and restore the momentum toward a peace agreement before President Clinton leaves office. The talks, held under tight security at an Air Force base in Washington, face extremely long odds after 12 weeks of Israeli-Palestinian violence that have left more than 325 people dead, about 85% of them Palestinians.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fighting for his political life, Prime Minister Ehud Barak is making one last high-stakes bid to achieve a peace agreement with the Palestinians in the final days of Bill Clinton's presidency. Only a few days ago, both Palestinians and Israelis were declaring the peace process all but dead and predicting that the Palestinian revolt in the West Bank and Gaza Strip would last for months, if not years.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli forces clashed with Palestinians in the streets of several West Bank towns Friday, leaving two dead and about 200 injured. However, the overall intensity of violence in the region appeared to be easing after a declared truce. For a second day, leaders on both sides called for restraint and worked to cool the charged atmosphere so that a cease-fire announced early Thursday could take hold. Other steps also were underway to regenerate movement toward peace.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Violence that has convulsed this region for nearly two weeks ebbed Tuesday as diplomats worked to return Israelis and Palestinians to speaking terms, and Jewish and Arab leaders turned to assessing permanent damage to their communities and their ability to coexist.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With continuing violence lengthening the already enormous odds against success, President Clinton tried Tuesday to coax Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat into accepting a U.S.-drafted framework to restart the moribund Middle East peace process. Clinton and Arafat, originally scheduled to meet for 90 minutes or less, conferred for almost 3 1/2 hours in two separate sessions, ending after 10 p.m.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fighting for his political life, Prime Minister Ehud Barak is making one last high-stakes bid to achieve a peace agreement with the Palestinians in the final days of Bill Clinton's presidency. Only a few days ago, both Palestinians and Israelis were declaring the peace process all but dead and predicting that the Palestinian revolt in the West Bank and Gaza Strip would last for months, if not years.
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Israeli and Palestinian leaders failed early today to reach agreement on a U.S.-brokered exit from the region's deadliest violence in years, fueling fears that bloodshed that has raged for seven straight days will continue unchecked. Contentious talks that lasted a day and a night in Paris broke down over details of an agreement that a French official had said was "90%" completed.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Israeli and Palestinian negotiators aimed to reach agreement on an American peace initiative in a second round of closed talks. The meeting at a kibbutz outside Jerusalem came one day after the sides held their first high-level talks in months. The talks were urged by the United States, which, after months of mediation, failed to get Israel to agree to withdraw its troops from an additional 13% of West Bank land.
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