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NEWS
March 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A bomb tossed through the window of a downtown discotheque wounded 16 American servicemen, one seriously, military and hospital officials said Saturday. Eleven Panamanians were also hurt. It is believed to be the first such attack on U.S. servicemen since the United States invaded Panama on Dec. 20 and overthrew the government of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. Two victims of the blast quoted witnesses of the attack late Friday at the My Place nightclub as saying the attacker shouted "Viva Noriega!"
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NEWS
January 16, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright arrived here Saturday in a bid to patch up feelings that were hurt when neither she nor President Clinton attended the recent ceremony in which control of the Panama Canal was turned over to Panamanians. Albright went on a brief tour of the Miraflores Locks section of the canal and recalled how, in the 1970s, she and other members of the Carter administration were proud of the decision to turn the waterway over to Panama.
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NEWS
December 21, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning at H-hour--1 a.m. Eastern time Wednesday--the U.S. military fanned across the narrow waist of Panama intent on dismembering the Panamanian military organization that Gen. Manuel A. Noriega has headed for more than six years. By morning, the coordinated assault of more than 20,000 troops--including waves of U.S.
NEWS
January 1, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States turned over control Friday of the Panama Canal to this Central American nation, withdrawing from a relationship that symbolized the best and the worst of the U.S. role in Latin America during the 20th century. "The canal is ours," Panamanian President Mireya Moscoso exclaimed, minutes before hoisting her nation's flag over the canal administration building.
NEWS
February 6, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Two federal grand juries Friday announced indictments of Panama military strongman Manuel A. Noriega and 16 associates, including leaders of the infamous Medellin narcotics cartel, on drug smuggling and money laundering charges. The racketeering indictments, returned by grand juries in Miami and Tampa, Fla., marked the first time a top official of a government crucial to U.S. foreign policy interests has been charged in U.S. courts. Gen.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The army major who led the unsuccessful coup a week ago against Panama's Gen. Manuel A. Noriega was buried Monday. Several reports have said that an enraged Noriega shot Maj. Moises Giroldi Vega to death minutes after the coup attempt against the Panamanian leader. Relatives of Giroldi, 38, said he was shot once in the neck and twice in the chest. At a funeral Mass attended by about 100 people, his mother, Eloisa, cried, "They murdered him!" and flung herself on the coffin.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER and THOMAS B. ROSENSTEIL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than a week, the American military has been hurling a fury of scathing images and epithets at Manuel A. Noriega in a campaign clearly designed to demean and demonize the fallen Panama leader.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive U.S. invasion force on Wednesday overthrew the regime of Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, chasing the dictator into hiding with an air and infantry assault that left at least 15 American GIs dead. The White House offered a $1-million reward for information leading to Noriega's capture.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The Panamanian government turned off the electricity at homes of U.S. Embassy employees Sunday, leaving the diplomats in the dark and wondering whether to pay their light bills and break President Reagan's dollar embargo against Panama. The move to cut the lights had been expected, embassy spokesman Terrence Kneebone said, because the United States is about two months behind in paying the electrical bills of its employees to the government of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Dark green military helicopters settled to the ground, their silhouettes looking for a moment like the dragonflies that swarm through Panama's jungles in the rainy season. As the big blades slowed, the choppers disgorged dozens of crouching U.S. soldiers in combat dress. The soldiers fanned out to protect the old installations of the Gatun Locks of the Panama Canal from imagined saboteurs.
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | From Associated Press
Standing before mammoth container ships rising and falling on their path between the seas Tuesday, former President Jimmy Carter witnessed the ceremonial transfer of the Panama Canal, an act he set in motion 22 years ago. Top U.S. officials turned down invitations to attend after conservatives in the United States predicted that Panama will mismanage the canal once it ceases to be American at noon Dec. 31. But Carter, the official head of a 29-member U.S.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton expressed confidence Tuesday that the government of Panama will keep the Panama Canal open to all shipping when it assumes control of the waterway at the end of the month. But he decided to skip the formal hand-over ceremony and send former President Carter in his place. Talking to reporters before embarking on a trip to California, Clinton sought to finesse the end of U.S. ownership of a canal that American engineers completed 85 years ago.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the United States agreed to give back the vast canal that it blasted through the Isthmus of Panama nine decades ago, the transfer was envisioned as a powerful, symbolic end to a century of U.S. dominance. But with less than two months to go before Panama is to assume control of the waterway Dec. 31, the Clinton administration is loath to join the celebration. During a visit to Washington last month, Panamanian President Mireya Moscoso urged President Clinton to attend the ceremony.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the sun rises over the Caribbean, the multinational crew loads one last container of cargo from the port of Colon and steers this ship toward the Gatun Locks for its first voyage through the Panama Canal. Capt. Karsten Jepsen sits on the bridge, binoculars in hand, barely containing his excitement. In his 19 years at sea, the blond, round-faced sailor has seen much of the world, but, like his ship, he has yet to pass through this legendary man-made waterway.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | From Associated Press
The United States' long goodbye to Panama neared an end Friday with the formal departure of the regional U.S. Army headquarters, leaving only a few hundred soldiers until the Panama Canal is handed over at year's end. "Your 88-year mission here is done," Marine Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm, head of the U.S. Southern Command, told a closing ceremony at Ft. Clayton's Soldier's Field parade ground. "You can report with pride: Mission accomplished."
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their culture began disappearing 20 years ago, and by the end of this year it will be completely gone. No one even considered trying to save it. Theirs was a tiny civilization of fewer than 1 million people that existed on a narrow strip of land for a few generations, not quite spanning the 20th century.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American leaders, even those who shared Washington's aim of ending Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's dictatorship in Panama, overwhelmingly condemned the U.S. military invasion there Wednesday and refrained from recognizing his American-installed successor. After a flurry of urgent telephone consultations begun before dawn, officials across the Western Hemisphere declared that the Bush Administration had violated their cherished principle of nonintervention.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writers
The chief of state security, two other officers in Panama's military high command and 35 soldiers were arrested after a failed attempt to overthrow dictator Manuel A. Noriega, the government said Wednesday night. The announcement, in a "war communique" read on national television, was the first indication that support for the failed coup Tuesday may have gone beyond the middle-level officers who claimed responsibility for it. Maj. Moises Giroldi Vega, leader of the forces who seized Gen.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States formally handed its Rodman Naval Station to Panama, the first of five military bases to be turned over this year ahead of the historic transfer of the Panama Canal. In a simple yet colorful morning ceremony, a contingent of sailors in dress whites gently lowered the Stars and Stripes. Rodman is the first of five bases that the U.S. is relinquishing under a 1977 treaty signed by President Carter that surrenders the entire canal to Panama by Dec. 31.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States and Panama announced that they had failed to negotiate an agreement to permit American troops to remain in Panama beyond the end of the century. The Panama Canal treaties require the departure of the soldiers by Dec. 31, 1999, when control over the waterway reverts to Panama. Since 1997, the two countries had sought to agree on establishing a multinational counternarcotics center in which military personnel from the U.S. and other hemispheric countries would take part.
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