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United States Foreign Relations Paraguay

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NEWS
January 19, 1987
Clyde R. Taylor, the U.S. ambassador in Paraguay, is in danger of becoming persona non grata because of his continued support for the opposition, Interior Minister Sabino Augusto Montanaro said. The statement by Montanaro, vice president of the ruling Colorado Party, follows Taylor's offer to help the opposition station Radio Nanduty end the jamming of its signals, which caused it to suspend operations last Wednesday because of financial losses.
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NEWS
February 21, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secret Service records released Thursday show that a contributor to the Democratic Party with ties to Paraguay was invited to the White House 12 times between 1994 and 1996 and the administration confirmed that he met with top U.S. officials to discuss concerns about a coup in that South American country.
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NEWS
September 23, 1987
The U.S. State Department expressed disappointment at "signs of renewed political repression" in Paraguay, ruled by military strongman Alfredo Stroessner for 33 years. A statement read to reporters by a department spokesman noted recurring arrests of prominent political figures, indefinite suspension of the newspaper El Pueblo and re-emergence of "officially endorsed vigilantes to suppress legitimate political dissent."
NEWS
July 30, 1988 | United Press International
The Senate confirmed the nomination Friday of Timothy Lathrop Towell as U.S. ambassador to Paraguay. Towell, a career Foreign Service officer, was routinely approved, 88 to 0, without debate.
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Police blocked guests on their way to a pro-democracy reception honoring U.S. Ambassador Clyde D. Taylor and lobbed tear gas into the midst of the garden festivities, the U.S. Embassy said Tuesday. Taylor, who has repeatedly clashed with President Alfredo Stroessner's government, later left the site under escort of U.S. security personnel. The crowd dispersed, and there were no arrests or serious injuries reported.
NEWS
March 23, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Clyde Taylor knew it would be more than just another diplomatic reception when a policeman poked him in the chest and demanded to see identification. Taylor was admitted to what was billed as a dinner party for 300 sponsored by a group called "Women for Democracy" at an uptown private home. Most of the other silk-stocking guests were turned away. Accustomed to command, they jostled in fury behind a police cordon. For want of better inspiration, they sang a protest "Happy Birthday."
NEWS
July 30, 1988 | United Press International
The Senate confirmed the nomination Friday of Timothy Lathrop Towell as U.S. ambassador to Paraguay. Towell, a career Foreign Service officer, was routinely approved, 88 to 0, without debate.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secret Service records released Thursday show that a contributor to the Democratic Party with ties to Paraguay was invited to the White House 12 times between 1994 and 1996 and the administration confirmed that he met with top U.S. officials to discuss concerns about a coup in that South American country.
NEWS
September 25, 1987
U.S. Ambassador Clyde D. Taylor Jr. has been accused of interfering in Paraguay's internal affairs, and a senior official of the ruling Colorado Party said he may be expelled for allegedly attempting to bring down the government of President Alfredo Stroessner. "We are warning this diplomat that if he persists in his keenness to bring down Stroessner's government, his days in our glorious Paraguay are numbered," said Modesto Esquivel, a member of the party's governing board. The U.S.
NEWS
March 23, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Clyde Taylor knew it would be more than just another diplomatic reception when a policeman poked him in the chest and demanded to see identification. Taylor was admitted to what was billed as a dinner party for 300 sponsored by a group called "Women for Democracy" at an uptown private home. Most of the other silk-stocking guests were turned away. Accustomed to command, they jostled in fury behind a police cordon. For want of better inspiration, they sang a protest "Happy Birthday."
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Police blocked guests on their way to a pro-democracy reception honoring U.S. Ambassador Clyde D. Taylor and lobbed tear gas into the midst of the garden festivities, the U.S. Embassy said Tuesday. Taylor, who has repeatedly clashed with President Alfredo Stroessner's government, later left the site under escort of U.S. security personnel. The crowd dispersed, and there were no arrests or serious injuries reported.
NEWS
January 19, 1987
Clyde R. Taylor, the U.S. ambassador in Paraguay, is in danger of becoming persona non grata because of his continued support for the opposition, Interior Minister Sabino Augusto Montanaro said. The statement by Montanaro, vice president of the ruling Colorado Party, follows Taylor's offer to help the opposition station Radio Nanduty end the jamming of its signals, which caused it to suspend operations last Wednesday because of financial losses.
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