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United States Foreign Relations Persian Gulf

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October 15, 1990 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when network managers are looking at ways to cut the costs of global news-gathering in a soft economy, the responsibility of covering the crisis in the Persian Gulf is wreaking havoc with their news budgets. Until recently, ABC, CBS, NBC and CNN each had been spending about $1 million a week to cover the international crisis that developed when Iraq invaded Kuwait Aug. 2. With the story more quiescent at the moment, the figure has dropped closer to $500,000 a week.
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NEWS
September 23, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what appears to be escalating brinkmanship, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has been orchestrating a series of provocative acts designed to lure the United States into a military response and focus world debate on U.S. policy toward Iraq, Clinton administration officials say. Over the past six weeks, Baghdad has threatened the Kurdish regions in northern Iraq, called for the overthrow of monarchies in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, banned visits by humanitarian aid workers and a new team of U.N.
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NEWS
July 20, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER and DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writers
Iran's move toward a negotiated settlement of its war with Iraq could lead gradually to renewed relations with the United States and a new era for U.S. interests in the strategic Persian Gulf region, analysts and diplomats said Tuesday.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The showdown with Iraq demonstrates that America's support from its Persian Gulf allies has shrunk since the 1991 war and suggests that the United States may need a new battle plan for any renewed face-off with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, analysts say. Although Pentagon officials contend that they had all the military assistance they required in the latest confrontation, neither Saudi Arabia nor Turkey agreed to let warplanes fly from its bases.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Senior U.S. and Soviet officials will meet next month in a neutral European country to confer on problems in the Persian Gulf, prospects for Mideast peace talks and the protracted war in Afghanistan, according to Washington sources. Richard W. Murphy, assistant secretary of state for the Middle East, will ask senior Soviet diplomat Vladimir P. Polyakov for help in steering a resolution through the U.N.
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writers
The State Department's top Middle East expert said Thursday that the United States is ready to protect Kuwaiti oil tankers to upset Iranian plans to dominate the Persian Gulf region, preserve free navigation in international waters and avoid what could be a ruinous surge in oil prices. While conceding that the action could result in armed clashes between the United States and Iran, Assistant Secretary of State Richard W.
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | United Press International
U.S. envoy Vernon A. Walters arrived in Beijing on Friday to generate Chinese support for a U.N. resolution to end the Iran-Iraq War. Walters, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, met with senior Foreign Ministry officials shortly after his arrival from Tokyo, a U.S. Embassy spokesman said. Walters is expected to meet with Foreign Minister Wu Xueqian today. The embassy spokesman said Walters' mission is to persuade the Chinese to support the U.N.
NEWS
December 25, 1987
Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci announced he will soon go to the Persian Gulf to visit American naval forces and consult with allied nations in the region. Carlucci announced the trip during an interview on the the CBS program "Nightwatch." He did not say when the trip will be made, but a Pentagon official said it will take place "early in January." Carlucci, who replaced Caspar W.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are becoming more concerned with the domestic consequences of the Persian Gulf crisis, particularly rising gasoline prices, according to a survey released today that registers public response to the news. In addition, Americans seem to have grasped many of the particulars in the federal budget crisis and their familiarity with the details may have negative political consequences for the Republicans.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The showdown with Iraq demonstrates that America's support from its Persian Gulf allies has shrunk since the 1991 war and suggests that the United States may need a new battle plan for any renewed face-off with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, analysts say. Although Pentagon officials contend that they had all the military assistance they required in the latest confrontation, neither Saudi Arabia nor Turkey agreed to let warplanes fly from its bases.
NEWS
February 12, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top Pentagon officials Wednesday gave new hints that military action against Iraq is approaching by declaring that the United States has all the Persian Gulf political support and almost all the forces and materiel it needs to wage a prospective air campaign. Closing three days of top-level meetings, Defense Secretary William S.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | Associated Press
The Bush Administration is having trouble getting its Gulf War allies to agree on how to deal with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, it was reported Sunday. After Pentagon briefings about plans to bomb what is left of Iraq's secret weapons sites, allies voiced reservations or even opposition, the New York Times reported. Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak reportedly dislikes the idea of renewed bombing, and Saudi Arabia and Turkey expressed misgivings. Pentagon sources reportedly said U.S.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The surprise peace proposal unveiled by the Kremlin on Thursday was in fact a joint effort by the Soviet Union and Iran--a diplomatic odd-coupling of two of Washington's oldest foes with potential consequences that stretch well beyond the war in the Persian Gulf. The extraordinary cooperation between Moscow and Tehran was brought on by a shared anxiety over U.S. diplomatic gains and long-term intentions in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will spend Thanksgiving Day with U.S. troops in the Persian Gulf, the White House announced Friday. Bush, who will leave Washington on Nov. 16 at the start of an eight-day trip to Europe and the Middle East, will also meet in Egypt with President Hosni Mubarak and in Saudi Arabia with King Fahd, the Saudi monarch, and the exiled emir of Kuwait, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1990 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when network managers are looking at ways to cut the costs of global news-gathering in a soft economy, the responsibility of covering the crisis in the Persian Gulf is wreaking havoc with their news budgets. Until recently, ABC, CBS, NBC and CNN each had been spending about $1 million a week to cover the international crisis that developed when Iraq invaded Kuwait Aug. 2. With the story more quiescent at the moment, the figure has dropped closer to $500,000 a week.
NEWS
October 12, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Bush's near-total absorption with the Persian Gulf crisis has led to such dramatic missteps and equivocation on how to cut the federal deficit that a second crisis over the budget is mushrooming--sowing confusion within Bush's own party and eroding his authority in Washington. By shaking public confidence in his leadership, it could even cut down his political freedom to deal militarily with the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what appears to be escalating brinkmanship, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has been orchestrating a series of provocative acts designed to lure the United States into a military response and focus world debate on U.S. policy toward Iraq, Clinton administration officials say. Over the past six weeks, Baghdad has threatened the Kurdish regions in northern Iraq, called for the overthrow of monarchies in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, banned visits by humanitarian aid workers and a new team of U.N.
NEWS
November 27, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
Democratic presidential candidate Jesse Jackson barnstormed across three Persian Gulf countries Thursday, squeezing a three-day schedule into a single day so he could fly back to Chicago for the funeral of a political ally. The candidate's campaign-style journey through the heart of a region beset by tensions because of the Persian Gulf war between Iran and Iraq produced scenes of incongruity.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are becoming more concerned with the domestic consequences of the Persian Gulf crisis, particularly rising gasoline prices, according to a survey released today that registers public response to the news. In addition, Americans seem to have grasped many of the particulars in the federal budget crisis and their familiarity with the details may have negative political consequences for the Republicans.
NEWS
July 20, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER and DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writers
Iran's move toward a negotiated settlement of its war with Iraq could lead gradually to renewed relations with the United States and a new era for U.S. interests in the strategic Persian Gulf region, analysts and diplomats said Tuesday.
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