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United States Foreign Relations Peru

NEWS
May 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori insisted that his election victory was fair despite an opposition boycott and condemnation from the U.S., which called his "regime" a serious threat to Latin American democracy. He won a third consecutive term Sunday after opposition leader Alejandro Toledo urged the boycott, citing fraud concerns. The U.S.
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NEWS
April 25, 2001 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIME STAFF WRITER
Anti-drug warriors involved in a U.S.-Peruvian airborne interdiction effort that has slashed the South American nation's cocaine production had a warning for smugglers: "You fly, you die." That warlike motto governed the zone of low-intensity conflict into which a Cessna seaplane carrying U.S. Baptist missionaries flew last week with disastrous results: A Peruvian air force jet assisted by a CIA surveillance plane mistakenly shot down the Cessna, killing a woman and her infant daughter.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cartagena summit marked important progress toward harmonizing the once-disparate drug policies of the United States and the three cocaine-producing countries of South America, as well as reinforcing their resolve to fight cocaine traffic together, Latin American officials said Friday. "The results were precisely what we needed, a more aggressive commitment by all of the countries here," said Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez, the commander of Colombia's intelligence police.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombian officials Sunday accused the Bush Administration of initiating a naval and air blockade of Colombia and refused to take part in American drug-interdiction patrols off the Colombian coast. Angered by Washington's unilateral decision to dispatch a flotilla of warships for anti-drug patrols off the Colombian coast, the officials complained that they had not been consulted.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
The United States and the cocaine producing countries of Bolivia, Colombia and Peru tentatively agreed Sunday to include military units from each country in a stepped-up war on drugs. However, South American delegates said the agreement leaves out any language that might open the door to direct U.S. intervention in the fight. The text of the plan will be kept secret until President Bush and at least two of the South American presidents sign it at a drug summit Feb.
NEWS
April 15, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, apparently abandoning hope for an early return to a constitutional government in Peru, Tuesday ordered home U.S. military personnel who have been training police and military units in counternarcotics tactics. The decision, announced by the State Department, is the first step in disengaging the U.S. government from what had been the centerpiece of its $2.2-billion-a-year Andean anti-drug strategy--an effort to stop the flow of cocaine at its source.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Saturday hailed the death of a notorious drug trafficker in a half-hour gun battle in Colombia, saying he was "delighted" that Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha had been "brought to bay." With French President Francois Mitterrand at his side after the two met on this sun-swept French Caribbean island, Bush said at a news conference that the police action that ended in Rodriguez Gacha's death was "a very courageous effort on the part of the Colombians."
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nothing seemed more remote from the reality of Peru on Wednesday than Vice President Dan Quayle's plea for the country to join America's war on drugs. The morning papers brimmed with photos of bombings and demonstrations and looting in Lima. Peruvians waited fearfully for news of the soaring price increases that the new government of President Alberto Fujimori planned to announce in an austerity program.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush flew here for his much-heralded summit with three Latin American presidents Thursday and proclaimed after about three hours of meetings that the four nations have formed "the first anti-drug cartel." An 11-page "Declaration of Cartagena" signed by Bush and the presidents of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru said that fighting drug traffic requires effective efforts to reduce demand for drugs in consuming countries and to stimulate economic development in producing countries.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton praised embattled President Alberto Fujimori of Peru on Monday for "skillfully walking a fine line" by trying to resolve the Lima hostage crisis peacefully "without giving in to terror." The abundant words of praise were relayed to reporters by Deputy White House Press Secretary David Johnson after a hastily scheduled 20-minute meeting between the two presidents.
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